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Daily Report 



Daily Christian Advocate 

THE GENERAL CONFERENCE OF THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 
Tuesday, April 16, 199B 



Denver, Colorado 



Vol. 5 No. 1 



Ministry Committee to Handle One Third of All Petitions 



The Committee on Ordained and Diaconal Ministry 
will face the most daunting challenge of the 11 General 
Conference legislative committees, one thousand and 
fifty two petitions, one third of the total 3,070 pieces of 
legislation, have been assigned to that group, compared 
to only 546 handled by the same committee at the 1992 
General Conference. The Committee on Church and 
Society will take on the next highest number of petitions, 
330. 

According to General Conference Secretary Carolyn 
Marshall, the large number of members (110) of the 
Ordained and Diaconal Ministry Conunittee will make it 
possible to have more than the normal number of sub- 
committees. In addition, the presentation of Ministry 
Study legislation to the plenary session set for tomorrow 
should reduce the amount of time needed to process this 
legislation. 

Legislation assigned to other committees breaks down 
as follows: Local Church, 302; Financial Administration, 
263; Conferences, 253; General and Judicial Administra- 
tion, 247; Discipleship, 212; Independent Commissions, 
198; Global Ministries, 153; and Higher Education and 
Chaplaincy, 54. 

General Agencies Submit 1,005 Petitions 

Of the petitions sent to the General Conference, gen- 





Agenda 




Tuesday, Aprill 6 


1:30 p.m. 


Holy Communion and Memorial Service 


2:45 p.m. 


Roll Call; Report of the Committee on 




Plan of Organization and Rules of 




Order; Nominations 




Report of the Committee on Agenda 


4:30 p.m. 


Organization of legislative committees 




and election of offlcers 


6:00 p.m. 


Training of legislative committee officers 


7:45 p.m. 


Hymn Sing 


8:15 p.m. 


Episcopal Address 


9:15 p.m. 


Meeting of legislative committee officers 



eral agencies submitted 1,005. Annual conferences 
added an additional 835, with Western North Carolina 
sending the most, 161. 

The Council of Bishops put together the largest pack- 
age of legislation of any single group, mcluding 280 
petitions in the Study on the Ministry. Ami Bateman and 
Patricia Meyers of Oregon followed with 95 petitions 
related to the Ministry Study. The UM Rural Fellowship 
sent 80; the Methodist Federation for Social Action, 65; 
the Aldersgate Covenant group based in Denton, Texas, 
51; and the Diaconal Ministry Clearness Committee 
from Claremont School of Theology, 29. 

The most petitions fi'om a single individual came fi-om 
Jerry Eckert, a retired clergy member of the Wisconsin 
Conference, who submitted 44. Ted Agnew, a retired 
professor fi-om Stillwater, Okla. followed with 24, while 
Gary Thurman, a laymember of First UMC in Midland, 
Texas, and Thomas Oden, a professor at Drew Univer- 
sity Theological School, tied with 20 each. 

Areas of Concern 

Disciplinary changes are involved in a majority of the 
legislation facing this quadrennium's General Confer- 
ence. Delegates will weigh a variety of proposals for a 
restructure of the Church, from general agencies to 
annual conferences and local congregations. Most peti- 
tions are designed to allow greater flexibility for mission 
and ministry. Proposals likely to stir debate include a call 
to eliminate GCOM and the assignment of greater power 
to the Council of Bishops, homosexuality, the Ministry 
Study, the Baptism Study, and church finances. 

Assignment of Petitions 

Petitions are assigned to legislative committees based 
on a division of disciplinary paragraphs established by 
the Commission on General Conference. Marshall noted 
that those assignments were reviewed yesterday by the 
Committee on Reference. After consideration by the 
appropriate legislative committee, the original petition 
may be amended and/or forwarded to the plenary ses- 
sion with a recommendation of "concurrence" or "non- 
concurrence." 

—Joan Shoup 



April 16. 1996 



ir.-r/«« 



^)^ity ana ^ountu of ^e^nvef 

CITY AND COUNTY BUILDING • DENVER, COLORADO • 80202 



Dear Friends 



Situated in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains. Denver offers the best of both worlds for your 
jid the serenity of mountain getaways 
and restaurants will ensure a thoroughly 




Yours mily. 




Wellington E. Webb 
Mayor 



Daily Christian 
Advocate 

Daily Christian Advocate is 
published in several advance 
and daily editions, except Sun- 
day, during sessions of the 
1996 General Conference <rf 
The United Methodist Church 
by The United Methodist Pub- 
lishing House, P.O. Box 801, 
NashviUe, TN 37202. 

Staff 

J. Richard Peck Edtor 

Joan Shoup Associate Ecfitor 

Richard Street . . . Composition Editor 



Ministry Study Will Be First Item of Business 



Assuming General Conference delegates approve a sug- 
gested plan of action, the first item of business will be the 
Study of Ministry. 

The Committee on the Plan of Organization and Rules 
of Order is suggesting that the Council of Bishops present 
its recommendations about ministry to a plenary session 
tomorrow morning following the laity address. 

After presentation of the study. General Conference will 
divide into 25 randomly selected non-legislative groups for 
90-minutes of reflection and dialogue on the study. Each 
group will be led by a bishop and will include a person who 
is not a delegate to serve as a recorder. 

Later tomorrow evening the leaders and recorders will 
identify areas of consensus as well as issues or questions. 
On Thursday, Judy Weidman, general secretary of UM 
Communications, will present a summary of committee 
reponses and a bishop will have an opportunity to make 
additional comments. 

The 280 petitions from the Council of Bishops on minis- 
try issues will then move to the Legislative Commitee on 
Ordained and Diaconal Ministries. That group will also 
deal with 36 petitions proposing amendments to the min- 
istry study and an additional 736 petitions on other aspects 
of ministry for a whopping total of 1,052 petitions. 

The bishops are proposing: 
• Affirmation of the ministry of all Christians. 



The creation of a "lay ministry steward"office in the 
local church composed of persons who discuss 
their call with the pastor and the Pastor-Parish 
Relations Committee, complete a course of study 
prescribed by the General Board of Discipleship, 
and are annually elected by the charge conference 

An order of deacons who have received a masters 
degree and completed two years in a service 
setting. All persons who are ordained deacons 
would serve a minimum of three years as a 
probationary member of the annual conference 
before election as full clergy members. The order 
would include persons in candidacy for elders' 
orders and non-itinerating clergy who formerly 
would have been consecrated as diaconal ministers. 

Procedures whereby present diaconal ministers 
may be ordained as deacons or permitted to 
continue as diaconal ministers. 

Provisions for some local pastors to complete a 
course of study and remain in this status without 
the currently required college work. 
An opening of the possibility for deacons to be 
Ucensed as local pastors. 



Daily Edition Vol. 5 No. 1 



STATE OF C0L0RAI30 



General Conference 

The United Methodist Church 

Denver. Colorado 



) welcome those attending the General Conference of the 



Over the years, the people of this organization have been committed to the values of 
our society and to the progress of our people You have helped our youth, cared for 
our senior citizens and contributed to the grovrth of our communities I know the 
people of Denver join me in thanking the members of this church for their many 
contributions throughout the years 

I would like to extend a special welcome to those delegates who have traveled to 
Colorado for this event I hope you can find time in your busy schedule to enjoy 
some of the many attractions Colorado and Denver have to offer The spectacular 
Rocky Mountains offer some of the best skiing, fishing, hunting and national and state 
parks in the worid In addition to the beautiful outdoors, you might want to visit one 
of the many impressive museums in Denver, the State Capitol Building or the newly 
' " "''' Street Mall 



Again, welcome and best wishes f 
Sincerely. 



1 memorable and product i 





Printed copies of 
morning worship 
service sermons 
are available at 
the DCA Sales 
Booth ($.50) and 
audio tapes of 
the services are 
available in the 
Cokesbury Dis- 
play area ($8) 



Preaching in Iliff Chapel 

Four bishops are scheduled to preach in Iliff Chapel on the 
campusof Iliff School of Theology during General Conference 
as S. Jameson Jones, Jr. Visiting Preachers. Services will be 
held at 11 a.m. Following the service, the bishop will be 
available to meet students, faculty, staff, and visitors. 

Tuesday, April 16 Bishop F. Herbert Skeet 

Wednesday, April 17... Bishop Kenneth L. Carder 

Tuesday, April 23 Bishop Joel Martinez 

Wednesday, April 24 . . . Bishop Susan M. Morrison 



TUESDAY., APRIL 1(1. 12:00 - 1:00 p.m. a 6:00- 7:00 p.i 

Leonard Sweet 

THE JESl 'S PRESCRJPTIOX FOR A HEM. THY LIFE 

TUESDAY. APRIL lb, 6:00 - 7:00 p.m. 
NAlMobney 

DON'T PUT A PERIOD WHERE GOD PUT A COMMA 



^^ Av„bbk-.,. 




Mary Ann Swenson 
Residing Bishop 



April 16. 1996 



The United Methodist Church 







Delegates and Visitors to the 1996 General Conference of The United Methodist Church 

Dear Family m Christ: 

Welcome to our neighborhood! We of the Denver area having been preparing for some time 
now to welcome the world to our neighborhood. We began with Bible study and gatherings 
to ground ourselves theologically. We studied the Biblical stories of receiving strangers and 
transformation of strangers to become friends. We considered ways to create spaces of 
hospitality. 

With our Bible Study we entered into prayer in a special way. We have prayed for the 
Conference. We have prayed for delegates and visitors. (In some cases there has been personal 
correspondence between prayer partners). We have prayed for the Church. We have prayed 
for the world. 



And now you have arrived. You are here, and we continue 
midst of the many hours of reading and study and debate an 
outside the convention center and lift your eyes to the hills. 



ray. We prav tha 
nferring, you will 



As you encounter the Rocky Mountains, we pray you will see them not as barriers but rather 
as God's creation of majestic grandeur. As you look toward them your eyes will scan Central 
City in the foothills. In the 1860's an African American woman arrived. Aunt Clara Brown, 
who had won her freedom from slavery in Kentucky, came with miners, paying her way with 
wash tubs and cook stove work. She used her money to buy freedom for members of her 
family and to establish them in business nearby. She opened her home, starting the Sunday 
school in Central City for St. James Methodist Episcopal Church. St. James United 
Methodist Church is the oldest United Methodist building in Colorado, begun in 1864 and 
completed in 1872 at a cost of $35,000. 

As you lift your eyes to the hills, may you know you are on the frontier. Like pioneers on 
the frontier who have gone before us, this year at General Conference you will be pioneers for 
the future, preparing the way for another century of mission and ministry in The United 
Methodist Church. 



L'Cha 



aM^na/TAj 



rsityBoulevard Den 



d802 10-4797 (003)733-5035 F.\X( 



The Disciple Staff cordially invites you to a clebration recognizing 
ten years of 

Disciple Bible Study 

April 17, 1996 

5:00 - 7:00 p.m. 

Ballroom 

Some video presenters will be there. If you would like them to sign your 
study manual bring it with you. 



Daily Edition Vol. 5 No. 1 



® 


Cokesbury Store Demonstrations 


Wednesday, April 17 


Monday, April 22 (continued) 


11:00 to 11:45 Abingdon Software 


1 :00 to 1 :45 Oxford Software 


12:00 to 12:45 Computer Hardware Questions & 


3:00 to 3:45 Abingdon Software 


Answers 


4:00 to 4:45 "In His Service" 


1:00 to 1:45 BibleSoft Softw^are 


5:00 to 5:45 How to Select the Right Software and 


3:00 to 3:45 Cokesbury Online/Internet 


Hardware for Your Church 


4:00 to 4:45 White Harvest Software 


6:00 to 6:45 Abingdon Software 


5:00 to 5:45 Church Management Software 




6:00 to 6:45 "Streets on a Disk" Shelby Systems 


Tuesday, April 23 




11:00 to 11:45 LOGOS Software 


Thursday, April 18 


12:00 to 12:45 "Streets on a Disk" 


11:00 to 11:45 Computer Hardware Industry Trends 


1:00 to 1:45 Cokesbury Online/Internet 


DTK 


3:00 to 3:45 Parsons Technology Software 


12:00 to 12:45 Software Resources for the Christian 


4:00 to 4:45 Cokesbury Online/Internet 


Daycare 


5:00 to 5:45 Oxford Software 


1 :00 to 1 :45 White Harvest Software 


6:00 to 6:45 Using Volunteers in the 


3:00 to 3:45 BibleSoft Software 


Computerized Chiu-ch Office 


4:00 to 4:45 DTK Hardware 




5:00 to 5:45 Networking Your Church Office 


Wednesday, April 24 


6:00 to 6:45 Church Management Software 


11:00 to 11:45 Church Management Software 




12:00 to 12:45 Using Your Computer as a Power 


Friday, April 19 


Tool for Bible Study 


11:00 to 11:45 Phone Tree 


1:00 to 1:45 Abingdon Software 


12:00 to 12:45 Abingdon Software 


3:00 to 3:45 Cokesbury Online/Internet 


1:00 to 1:45 Church Management Software 


4:00 to 4:45 Parsons Technology Software 


3:00 to 3:45 White Harvest Software 


5:00 to 5:45 LOGOS Software 


4:00 to 4:45 BibleSoft Software 


6:00 to 6:45 "Photo Sort" 


5:00 to 5:45 Mail Management 




6:00 to 6:45 Cokesbury Online/Internet 


Thursday, April 25 




1 1 :00 to 1 1 :45 Parsons Technology Software 


Saturd^, April 20 


12:00 to 12:45 LOGOS Software 


11:00 to 11:45 Church Management Software 


1:00 to 1:45 "Mail Manager" Shelby Systems 


12:00 to 12:45 Cokesbury OnUne/Internet 


3:00 to 3:45 Church Management Software 




4:00 to 4:45 Oxford Software 


Monday, April 22 


5:00 to 5:45 Using Computers to Spread the 


11:00 to 11:45 Using Computers for Church 


Good News 


Administration 


6:00 to 6:45 Cokesbury Online/Internet 


12:00 to 12:45 Software Resources to Track Time, 




Talents, and Treasures 





April 16, M 



Welcome to Our Neighborhood 



Early in the planning stages for this General Confer- 
ence, Bishop Mary Ann Swenson coined the phrase that 
was to become our working goal: "Welcome the World 
to Our Neighborhood." 

The Commission on the General Conference is re- 
sponsible for the overall planning of the conference. The 
commission is made up a lay member and a clergy 
member from each jurisdiction who are elected by and 
responsible to General Conference. The local committee 
is selected by the host conference to assist the commis- 
sion and to arrange for local hospitality. The local com- 
mittee has worked closely with Roger Kruse, business 
manager and executive director of the Commission on 
the General Conference. 

The local committee's five major divisions are educa- 
tion and interpretation, staffing and equipment, pro- 
gram, hospitality and courtesy, and bishops' hospitality. 
(Bishops' hospitality includes the Council of Bishops' 
meeting held in Denver the week preceding General 
Conference.) Each committee has several subcommit- 
tees with 800 to a thousand volunteers from churches 
across the Rocky Mountain and Yellowstone Annual 
Conferences, the two host conferences. 

Hosting the General Conference is an opportunity for 
congregations in the Denver area to become intention- 
ally involved in offering hospitality and growing in their 
understanding of the biblical meaning of the word. Con- 
gregations were urged to study hospitality, and several 
districts held workshops on the concept The Division 
of Education led this phase and organized the Prayer 
Tree, which coupled the names of five delegates/bish- 
ops/staff members with each local church in the Rocky 
Mountain and Yellowstone Annual Conferences. 

Hosting General Conference has not only given us the 
opportunity to do something for the whole church but 
has also created a sense of community within the two 
conferences, which encompass four states and part of 
another. District days were organized in both confer- 
ences, vnth two days reserved for each district's repre- 
sentatives to attend meetings designed to encourage 
them to observe and to volunteer. 

Needless to say, we are excited about your coming! 
Every church has been involved in the preparations, 
from participating in the Prayer Tree to volunteering at 
the convention site. Denver residents have opened their 
homes to members of our conferences as well as to 
guests from other conferences. 

Host Provide Assistance 

To help you settle in and be as comfortable as possible 
while you concentrate on the work before you, we have 
provided hosts in the airport, on the buses, and in the 
hotels. Each one is ready to answer your questions, from 
"What is that building?" to "Where can I replace what I 



forgot to bring?" to "How do I register?" and "Where do 
Igo?" 

Additional hosts have been stationed in the convention 
center to direct you to rooms and/or meetings. The 
information center, where you can obtain information 
about Denver and the surrounding areas, and the dele- 
gates' lounge will be open and staffed all day. Break your 
glasses? Lose a filling? Have a headache? Check in at the 
first aid room, where a doctor and/or nurse will be 
available from 8:30 a.m. until 5:30 p.m. A paramedic will 
also be on duty as long as delegates are in the building. 

A full slate of events and activities has been planned for 
the two weeks of the conference. The opening event was 
the bishops' reception which took place Monday night 
and reflected the ethnic diversity of the area. The ball- 
room of the convention center was decorated to carry out 
the theme "In aTongan Village," and during the evening, 
we were entertained by "our" Tongans with traditional 
song and dance. 

Luncheon Mini-Tours 

Several mini-tours to outreach projects are being of- 
fered during lunch breaks, with lunch included in the 
tour. First on the schedule is a walking tour of lower 
downtown. The number of openings for each tour is 
limited, so we encourage you to sign up as early as 
possible at the visitor information desk. 

Special Event D^, April 21 

Special Event Day, April 21, will give you the opportu- 
nity to choose how you would like to experience the 
Denver area. Available within a two-hour drive of Denver 
are six day-long tours that vvill enable you to experience 
a taste of the West and interact with people from the area. 
If you prefer not to take an extended tour, several area 
churches invite you to worship with them. Afterward, you 
may explore Denver on your own. For information about 
tours, church locations, and where persons from General 
Conference will be speaking, check at the visitor infor- 
mation center. 

A Night with Yellowstone 

To complete your day, we invite you to join us that 
evening for what promises to be a great experience. The 
convention center will open at 7 p.m. for an exhibition of 
the work of nationally-known sculptor and artist Tim 
Holmes. At 8:00 p.m., "A Night with Yellowstone" will 
begin with music and dancing by a group of Blackfoot 
Native Americans followed by a concert by the Montana 
Logging and Ballet Co. Tickets for these events will be 

(continued on next page) 



Daily Edition Vol. 5 No. 1 



(continued from last page) 

available at the visitor information desk until 5:30 p.m. 
Friday. 

Events for International Delegates/Guest 

Each day during the conference, international dele- 
gates and guests are invited to have lunch at Warren, 
Grant Avenue, or St. Paul's United Methodist Churches. 
Each of these downtown Denver churches has an active 
mission in its neighborhood. 

Meals will be brought from other churches as we 
work together to extend our hand of hospitality. On April 
22, international delegates will be special guests for 
lunch at lliff School of Theology. Transportation will be 
provided daily. 

Host families have been looking forward to housing 
guests from other conferences as well as from our own. 
The Supplemental Housing Committee has done a great 
job of compiling a list of hotels, motels, and a dormitory 
within a short distance of downtown Denver. Persons 
answering the requests have enjoyed the contacts they 



have made in helping delegates find suitable accommo- 
dations. 

Refreshment Breaks 

We are planning daily refreshment breaks. Dozens of 
cookies are being donated by churches across the two 
conferences, so plan on lots of good munching! (We also 
encouage everyone from a lower altitude to take advan- 
tage of the water stations that have been set up for your 
convenience.) In asking attendees to make a donation for 
beverages at the refreshment breaks, we are following 
the lead of the Louisville Conference in 1992. While we 
have $50,000 to $60,000 budgeted for amenities to make 
your stay an enjoyable one, spending $15,000 on coffee 
and cold drinks isn't good stewardship. 

Although we, like every conference in Methodism, 
have to deal with financial limits, there are no limits to 
the amount of time, energy, and hospitality we will dem- 
onstrate in taking care of you as long as you are our 
guests. If you need anything, please stop by the visitor 
information center and let us know. 

—Paula Johnston 



ORGANIZING SESSIONS AND TRAINING SESSIONS 




Committee Name 


Date 


Time 


Room 


Committee on Correlation 








and Editorial Review 


Tuesday. Aprill 6, 1996 


9:15 a.m. 


C108 


Committee on Presiding Officers 


Tuesday, April 16, 1996 


9:30 a.m. 


C212 


Committee on Courtesies and Privileges 


Tuesday, April 16, 1996 


9:30 a.m. 


C210 


Committee on Credentials 


Tuesday, April 16, 1996 


9:45 a.m. 


C208 


Committee on the Journal 


Tuesday, April 16, 1996 


9:45 a.m. 


A208 


Training Session for Secretaries 








and Assistant Secretaries 


Tuesday, April 16, 1996 


6:00 p.m. 


C205 


Training Session for Committee 








Chairs and Vice Chairs 


Tuesday, April 16, 1996 


6:00 p.m. 


C206 



Boston University Alumni 
Luncheon 

April 17-12:45-2:15 

Adam's Mark Hotel Denver 

1550 Court Place 

$15.75 per person 

Pay at the door 

Correction 

Chart A in the quadrennial report of 
the General Commission on Religion 
and Race, page 841 of Advance Edition 
1, incorrectly shows the Kansas East 
Annual Conference as having 1 cross- 
racial appointment. The correct 
number of cross-racial appointments 
for Kansas East is 13. 



BADGE COLORS 



Delegates 

Bishops 

Reserve Delegates 

Pages/Marshalls 

Board/Agency Staff 

Local Committees 

Volunteers/Visitors 

Press 

Commissions 

Spouses of Bishops 

Judicial Council 

Spouses of Judicial Council 

General Secetaries 

Ecumenical Guests 

Spouses of Commissions 

Special Services 

GCFA 



Teal ink on white stock 

Purple ink on white stock 

Green Ink on green stock 

Blue ink on pink stock 

Red ink on yellow stock 

Black ink on green stock 

Black ink on white stock 

Blue ink on blue stock 

Blue ink on yellow stock 

Purple ink on ivory stock 

Black ink on red stock 

Black ink of yellow stock 

Yellow stripe, black ink, white stock 

Orange stripe, black ink, white stock 

Red stripe, black ink, white stock 

Blue stripe, black ink, white stock 

Green stripe, black ink, white stock 



April 16, 1996 



Bishop Judith Craig to Deliver Episcopal Address 




Ohio West Area Bishop Judith Craig will present the episcopal address 
to the 1996 General Conference, 

— David CottaHi/ West Ohio News 



Bishop Judith Craig, resident bishop of the Ohio West 
Area, will deliver the episcopal address this evening at 
8:15 p.m. 

The presentation is precedent-setting in more than 
one way: Bishop Craig is the first woman bishop to 
present the address in the 184-year history of such 
endeavors, and she is the first to combine multimedia 
musical and visual images with the spoken word, in a 
departure fi-om the traditional presentations of a "state 
of the church" address. 

"My plan was to make this address more pastoral and 
invitational," Bishop Craig said in a recent interview. "At 
first 1 had this little idea of a few slides and a couple of 
graphic charts, but it's turned into something much 
more." 

When the Council of Bishops voted two years ago to 
designate Bishop Craig as the speaker, her colleagues 
chose someone who has been a pioneer throughout her 
life. 

One of five children of Ray and Edna Craig, Bishop 
Craig is a native of Liberty, Missouri, where she received 
her high school diploma and graduated from William 
Jewell College. 

While serving as a youth director for Bellefontaine 
Methodist Church in St. Louis, Bishop Craig studied at 
Eden Theological Seminary in Webster Groves, Mis- 
souri, and received an M.R.E. in 196L After an intern- 
ship in the New York City office of the National Council 
of the Churches of Christ in the U.SA, she became 
director of Christian education at First Methodist 
Church in Stamford, Connecticut. She worked there 



through 1968 while earning an M.Div. at Union Theo- 
logical Seminary in New York City. 

For the next two years tlie bishop studied at Teachers 
College of Union and Columbia University, specializing 
in the religious education of adults. During the same 
period, she was an instructor in adult basic education in 
the New York City School System for one year and an 
educational consultant at Epworth-Euclid United Meth- 
odist Church in Cleveland for the other. 

The attraction of parish work prevailed, and in 1970 
she became Epworth-Euclid's director of Christian edu- 
cation, serving in that position until she was ordained 
deacon in 1972. After ordination, she was appointed 
associate pastor at Epworth-Euclid. 

Ordained elder in 1976, she was appointed to Pleasant 
Hills United Methodist Church in Middleburg Heights, 
Ohio, hi 1980 Bishop James Thomas appointed her 
director of the East Ohio Conference Council on Minis- 
tries. She served as director until her election as bishop 
in 1984 at the North Central Jurisdictional Conference 
in Duluth, Minnesota. 

Bishop Craig's consecration set another precedent: 
The bishop who laid hands on Judith Craig was Marjorie 
Matthews, tlie first woman bishop in Christendom in 
almost 800 years. For both women, the moment was 
electric — the first such moment in modern times. 

Bishop Craig's service in a variety of aspects of the life 
of the Church both before and after her consecration has 
given her wide experience and a broad perspective on 
The United Methodist Church. She served the Michigan 
Area as bishop for eight years and was assigned to the 
Ohio West Area in 1992. 

Elected to both General Conference and jurisdictional 
conferences in 1980 and 1984, she was a member of the 
General Council on Ministries from 1980 to 1984 and a 
bishop on the General Commission on the Status and 
Role of Women fi-om 1984 to 1988. 

Bishop Craig served as chairperson of The Advance 
for Christ and His Church from 1988 to 1992. In produc- 
ing the videotape that introduced the Advance at the 
1992 General Conference, she drew on her Christian 
education roots while having fun with a group of chil- 
dren and a kite on a windy day. 

Currently she is a member of tlie General Board of 
Publication. On her episcopal visitation in 1994, she 
traveled through the Middle East to Egypt, Israel, Pal- 
estine, and Cyprus, representing the Council of Bishops 
in meetings with tlie Middle East Council of Churches. 

Tonight's multimedia episcopal address may have 
been her idea— or someone else's. "In the early consult- 
ations, the conversations sometimes went all day," she 
said. "Did I first offer Uiis, or did someone else?" 

Regardless of who may first have made tlie sugges- 
tion. Bishop Craig's conversation with a group that in- 
cluded UMCom General Secretary Judy Weidman 
ensured the idea would become reality. "She said, "We'll 
do it with you,'" Bishop Craig recalled. And that is what 
happened. 



Daily Edition Vol. 5 No. 1 



Noting that UMCom staff member Vmce Isner spent 
days looking through photographs, video clips, and 
other images, Bishop Craig added that as soon as the 
rough cut was ready Isner took it to Lake Junaluska 
where Bishop Sharon Rader was reading the second 
draft of the episcopal address to the Council of Bishops 
while itsauthor recuperated at home from knee surgery. 

"There was tremendous affirmation from the Coun- 
cil," Bishop Craig said. Handed to UMCom staffer Jay 
Voorhees for polishing, the address is almost in its final 
form. The last addition will be images from the afternoon 
service of Holy Communion, which will be edited into 
the final version of the presentation only moments be- 
fore it begins. 

"I feel like a major giver and receiver of gifts," Bishop 
Craig says, "and I feel I've done a significant piece of 
work. [The address] has been a constantly emerging 
work of the Spirit, and it is offered in a way that I believe 
will help the life of the Spirit be the basis of the Church's 
Ufe." 

—Tom Slack 

The First General Conference 

This year marks the 204th anniversary of General Con- 
ference. The first assembly — of clergy only — took place on 
November 1-15, 1792, in Baltimore. It was attended by 
ambitious, divisive, even tyrannical church leaders. 

Within a fledgling denomination, the first General Con- 
ference was a showdown of sorts between rival clergymen. 
In his essay, Crisis of Leadership: The General Conference 
ofl 792, Frederick A. Norwood writes that Methodists, for 
the first time, were forced "to deal legislatively with the 
personal tension between episcopal and parliamentary 
authority" — a tension that remains part of Methodism to- 
day. 

Much of that tension surely was felt in the shoulders and 
back of Francis Asbury. The first American "bishop" — a 
terra John Wesley opposed — of this young American 
church, Asbury wore a halo no straighter than those of his 
feisty colleagues. Some viewed him as tjo-annical. Others 
sensed that he lacked the acumen of an administrator and 
felt compelled (perhaps called) to test his leadership met- 
tle. Imagine Asbuiy's thankless task: to head a preachers' 
conference with literally no rules or constitution to keep 
the bishop's or conference's actions in check. 

A motion made at the first General Conference would 
limit the power of the bishop, an action directly targeted at 
Asbury. Following heated debate, the motion was voted 
down. After less than a week, the Rev. James O'Kelly and 
like-minded colleagues became the first official members 
to walk out of a General Conference. 

However, the wheels were in motion. The General Con- 
ference turned attention to enacting church legislation. 
The 1792 conference marked the beginning of an unbro- 
ken succession of quadrennial meetings on the state of the 
church. It became a quadrennial body answerable to the 
people called Methodists. Several decades passed, how- 
ever, before lay delegates were included in General Con- 
ference. And it was another 100 years before women were 
admitted. 



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April 16, 1996 



Schedule of Daily Worship Services 



Performances by guest choirs will highlight worship 
services each day of General Conference, except Sunday. On 
Tuesday afternoon, April 16, a concert by a mass Colorado 
choir will precede the Holy Communion and Memorial 
Service. That evening, a choir of bishops and their spouses 
will sing before the episcopal address delivered by Bishop 
Judith Craig. Beginning Wednesday, April 17, a guest choir 

Tuesday, April 16 

1:00 p.m. Concert: Mass Colorado Choir 

Chancel Choir, Fort Morgan UMC, Fort Morgan 

Connie Lx)ng, director 

Chancel Choir, Uttleton UMC, Uttleton 

David Kates, director 

Good News Singers, Smoky Hill UMC, Aurora 

Ben Yeatermeyer, director 

Chancel Choir, Green Mountain UMC, Lakewood 

Marion Summervill, director 

Chancel Choir of University Park UMC, Denver 

Robert Penn, director 

Chancel Choir of Trinity UMC, Denver 

Phyllis Raup, director 
1:30 p.m. Holy Communion and Memorial Service 

Preacher: Bishop Roy I. Sano 

Celebrant: Bishop Woodie W. White 
7:30 p.m. Concert: Bishops' and Bishops' Spouses Choir 

Joy Solomon, director 
7:45 p.m. Hymn Sing 
8:15 p.m. Episcopal Address: Bishop Judith Craig 

Wednesday, April 17 

8:15 a.m. Concert: McCurdy School Choir, Espanola, New 

Mexico 

Paula Nichols, director 
8:30 a.m. Worship 

Preacher: Bishop Alfred L Norris 

Thursday, April 18 

8:15 a.m. Concert: The Maranatha Choir, University UMC, 

Gainesville, Florida 

Robert W. Jackson, director 
8:30 a.m. Worship 

Preacher: Bishop Wiliam Boyd Grove 



Friday, April 19 

8:15 a.m. Concert: Choir of the First United Methodist 

Church, Peoria, Illinois 

Timothy McCoday, director 
8:30 a.m. Worship 

Preacher: Bishop Sharon Zimmerman Rader 



will sing each day before the morning worship service. 
Members of the Council of Bishops will preach at these 
services. Two choirs will also sing during plenary sessions. 
Coral Metodista Unida de Neueva York, directed by Jorge 
Lockward, will sing on Saturday, April 20. Africa University 
Choir, directed by Patrick Matsikenyiri, will sing on Tuesday, 
April 23. The schedule for the worship services is as follows: 

Saturday, April 20 

8:15 a.m. Concert: St. Luke Community UMC, Dallas, Texas 

Monya Logan, director 
8:30 a.m. Worship 

Preacher: Bishop Joseph C. Humper 

Monday, April 22 

8:15 a.m. Concert: Coral Metodista Unida de Neueva York, 

New York City 

Jorge Lockward, director 
8:30 a.m. Worship 

Preacher: Bishop L Bevel Jones III 

Tuesday, April 23 

8:15 a.m. Concert: Indonesian Choir of the Methodist 

Church of Indonesia 

Eunice Sitompul, director 
8:30 a.m. Worship 

Preacher: Bishop Thomas L. Hoyt 

Wednesday, April 24 

8:15 a.m. Concert: Lover's Lane Jazz Band, Lover's Lane 

UMC, Dallas, Texas 

Terry Price, director 
8:30 a.m. Worship 

Preacher: Bishop William W. Dew, Jr. 



Thursday, April 25 

8:15 a.m. Concert: Christ UMC Deaf and Sign Choir, 

Baltimore, Maryland 

Peggy Johnson, director 
8:30 a.m. Worship 

Preacher: Bishop Edwin C. Boulton 

Friday, April 26 

8:15 a.m. Concert: Iluzija Choir, United Methodist Church, 

Liepaja, Latvia 

Guntra Place, director 
8:30 a.m. Worship 

Preacher: Bishop Ann Sherer 
10:00 p.m. Closing Worship 

Preacher: Bishop Woodie W. White 



Directors of Music: S.T. Kimbrough, Jr. and Cynthia Wilson-Felder 

Organists: Austin Lovelace, Kathleen Forsberg 

Pianists: Richard Forsberg, Johnetta Johnson Page 



Daily Edition Vol. 5 No. 1 



Council of Bishops of The United Methodist Church 




Officers (May 1995-May 1996) 




President: Roy I. Sano 




President Designate: Woodie W. White 


Secretary: Melvin G. Talbert 




Assistant to the Secretary: E Ellis Finger, Jr. 


Active 


Susan Murch Moirison 




H.Ellis Finger Jr. 


Daniel C. Arichea 


Fritz Mutti (Albert F.) 




Ernest A Fitzgerald 


George W. Bashore 


Emerito P. Nacpil 




Eugene M. Frank 


Bruce P. Black 


J. Alfred Ndoricimpa 




JoseC. Gamboajr. 


Heinrich Bolleter 


Alfred L. Norris 




Paul LA. Granadosin 


Edwin C. Boulton 


William B.Oden 




Charles W.Hancock 


Kenneth L. Carder 


Fama Onema 




W.T Handy Jr. 


Sharon Brown Christopher 


Donald A Ott 




Paul Hardin Jr. 


Judith Craig 


Raymond H. Owen 




John Wesley Hardt 


Done Peter Dabale 


Sharon Zimmerman Radei 




Kenneth W. Hicks 


EmilioJ.M.deCarvalho 


Roy I. Sano 




Leroy C. Hodapp 


William W. Dew Jr. 


Ann B. Sherer 




DonW.Holter 


R Sheldon Duecker 


F. Herbert Skeet 




Earl G.Hunt Jr. 


Robert E. Fannin 


Dan E. Solomon 




Rueben P. Job 


Moises Domings Fernandes 


Forrest C. Stith 




Leontine T.C. Kelly 


EUas G. Galvan 


Thomas R Stockton 




Dwight E. Loder 


William Boyd Grove 


Mary Ann Swenson 




James K. Mathews 


Benjamin R. Gutierrez 


Melvin G. Talbert 




Joel D. McDavid 


J. Woodrow Hearn 


HansVaexby 




PaulW.Milhouse 


H.Hasbrouck Hughes Jr. 


Woodie W.White 




AbelT.Muzorewa 


Joseph Christian Humper 


Richard B. Wilke 




Ernest W. Newman 


Neil L Irons 


Joe A. Wilson 




Roy C. Nichols 


S. Clifton Ives 


Joseph H.Yeakel 




Benjamin R Oliphant 


Christopher Jokomo 






Almeida Penicela 


L. Bevel Jones III 


Retired 




John W. Russell 


Charles W.Jordan 


L. Scott Allen 




Carl J. Sanders 


Kainda Katembo 


Edsel A Ammons 




Franz W.Schaefer 


Hae-Jong Kim 


James Mase Ault 




Louis W. Schowengterdt 


Walter Klaiber 


Thomas S. Bangura 




0. Eugene Slater 


J. Loyd Knox 


Ole E. Borgen 




Robert H.Spain 


Arthur F. Kulah 


Monk Bryan 




W. Maynard Sparks 


David J. Lawson 


William R Cannon 




Hermann L. Sticher 


Clay Foster Lee Jr. 


Alsie H. Carleton 




Mack B. Stokes 


William B.Lewis 


Edward S. Carroll 




R Marvin Stuart 


Jao Somane Machado 


Wilbur W.Y.Choy 




Prince A. Taylor Jr. 


Joel N. Martinez 


Roy C.Clark 




James S. Thomas 


Felton E. May 


Wayne K Clymer 




JackM.Tuell 


Calvin D. McConnell 


Emerson S. Colaw 




Edward LTullis 


MarshaULMeadorsJr. 


Jesse R. DeWitt 




D. Frederick Wertz 


C.P. Minnickjr. 


Ernest T.Dixon Jr. 




Melvin E.Wheatley Jr. 


Ruediger R Minor 


Ralph E. Dodge 




C.Dale White 


Robert C. Morgan 


Paul A Duffey 




Lloyd C. Wicke 


William W.Morris 


R. Kern Eutsler 







April16. 1996 



1996 Laity Address Calls 
God's People to be "Partners in Ministry*' 




James W. (Jim) Lane of Sherwood, Arkansas will present the laity 
address at 9:00 on Wednesday morning. 

photo by Jane Dennis 

James W. Qim) Lane of Sherwood, Ark., cares deeply 
for his church, his Lord, and the vital role and involve- 
ment of laity in bringing the redemptive message of 
Jesus Christ to the world. He has proven those strongly 
held beliefs through exceptional leadership and service 
over the last three decades to his local church, district, 
and conference, as well as to the general Church, world 
Methodist organizations, and ecumenical bodies. So it 
is natural that this longtime United Methodist has been 
selected to deliver the 1996 laity address at General 
Conference. Yet, his selection has nothing to do with his 
personal accomplishments or leadership roles. What 
convinced the Executive Committee of the National 
Association of Annual Conference Lay Leaders 
(NAACLL) to ask Lane to speak for the Church's 9.7 
million lay members were his thoughts and ideas for the 
future of the Church— a Church made stronger by its 
network of "Partners in Ministry," the theme for this 
year's address. 

Paul R. Ervin Jr., president of the NAACLL, explained 
that the process for selection of the laity speaker was 
altered this quadrennium "because we want the mes- 
sage to be the focus and not just the messenger." Annual 
conference lay leaders, rather than laity at large, were 
invited to submit written manuscripts, which were then 
judged "blind," without the names of the authors at- 
tached. A panel of independent judges considered the 
17 manuscripts that were submitted. "1 was stunned 
when I learned my manuscript was selected," said Ume, 
lay leader of the North Arkansas Conference. "I was also 



very thrilled that what I wrote was selected and not me 
or what I've done or any office Uiat I've held." 

Lane explained that he began putting his thoughts 
down on paper more than a year ago as he studied the 
North Arkansas Conference vision statement "I began 
to formulate ideas and images that came into my mind 
as 1 connected with the statement and it began to speak 
to me. I wrote sitting at my computer for one whole day, 
and it just grew and grew from there." He wrote: "We 
are being drawn like a magnet toward this new century. 
Our imagination has been captured by all kinds of 'what 
if questions about 'what might be' in the year 2000.... As 
United Methodist Christians, today is our time to see 
the visions, dream the dreams and to prophesy, as God's 
Holy Spirit is now poured out upon us. As the story of 
Esther informs us in the Old Testament — God has 
surely brought us to this place for just such a time as 
this!" 

When the contest for selecting the laity speaker was 
announced, Lane made some additional changes and 
submitted his "visioning" thoughts. Tlie address is now 
entitled "Partners in Ministry: A Vision for the Year 
2000." Since the selection was announced in November, 
Lane has presented the address before NAACLL mem- 
bers and continued to perfect the document. "While the 
laity address is not a consensus document from the 
conference lay leaders, I received wonderful input and 
many helpful and constructive suggestions from them," 
Lane said. 

The 1996 address examines "the imagery of the next 
millennium," Lane said, and his "hopes and dreams of 
the Church centering its mission and ministry on reach- 
ing out and receiving people where they are, relating 
them to God through Jesus Christ, training them in 
Christian discipleship, and then sending them out in 
their community for ministry." Lane feels that with this 
approach at its core, "the Chiu-ch will be far better 
served than if we choose to chase after myriad social 
issues that tend to separate and divide us. 

Not only will this be Lane's first opportunity to for- 
mally address General Conference, but the audience of 
about 2,000 delegates and observers will be the largest 
audience he's ever faced. Previously, his largest audi- 
ence was 900 persons who participated in the North 
Arkansas Conference Vision 2000 launch event in 1995. 
Lane was the first lay delegate to be elected to the North 
Arkansas Conference's 1996 delegation. Previously, he 
served as a reserve delegate to the 1984, 1988, and 1992 
General Conferences. Retired from U.S. Government 
Federal Civil Service and the U.S. Army reserve, the 
59-year-old Lane is a delegate to the 17th World Meth- 
odist Conference to be held in Rio de Janeiro in August 
A delegate to the 1996 South Central Jurisdictional Con- 
ference, he is co-chair of the Jurisdictional Committee 
on the Episcopacy for the next quadrennium. He is a 

(continued on next page) 



Daily Edition Vol. 5 No. 1 



13 



(continued from last page) 

member of the Forum of 32, which assisted the General 
Council on Ministries in its Connectional Issues Study 
over the last quadrennium. He previously served on the 
General Commission on Communication, on the 1984 
General Conference Hymnal Revision Committee, and 
on the board of managers of the National Council of 
Churches' Department of Communication. Lane is ciu"- 
rently chair of the North Arkansas Conference Vision 
2000 Task Force and Council on Lay Life and Work. He 
is a member of the Conference Council on Ministries, 
Committee on Nominations, and Planning Committee, 
as well as the Arkansas Area Committee on the Episco- 
pacy. 

A member of Levy United Methodist Church, Little 
Rock, Ark., he has been a lay member of the North 
Arkansas Annual Conference every year since 1972. 
Lane has 30 years' experience as a certified lay speaker 
and an adult Sunday school teacher. He is a member of 



the Arkansas Interfaith Conference and a teacher of 
Disciple Bible Study. A writer and computer enthusiast. 
Lane has written articles for Interpreter magazine and 
authored lay speaking resource booklets for the General 
Board of Discipleship and Hinton Rural Life Center, 
HayesviUe, N.C. Lane's latest honor is being elected the 
next president of the NAACLL. 

The laity address will be presented Wednesday, April 
17, during the morning session of General Conference. 
Among friends and family members who will be in the 
audience will be Lane's wife of 33 years, Nell Bizzell 
Lane. "I'm not nervous about giving the speech," he said. 
"I'm just hopeful the message I've written will come 



-Jane Dennis 



Jane Dennis is editor of the Arkansas United Methodist 
newspaper, Little Rock, Ark. 



Bishops' Prayer Vigil 

The bishops have committed themselves to a 24-hour 
prayer vigil from the opening worship service Tuesday, 
>^ril 16 through the closing business sessions and ad- 
journment Friday, April 26. 

A room in die hotel where the bishops will stay and 
room C207 in the convention center are being designated 
as chapels where visitors and delegates can join the bish- 
ops in their vigil. 



Bishops' and Spouses' Choir to Sing 

At 7:30 p.m. on the opening night of the conference, 
a choir of bishops and spouses will sing under the 
direction of Joy Solomon, wdfe of Oklahoma Bishop 
Dan Solomon. White said he believes the choir is a 
"first" for General Conference. "It will give the church 
an opportunity to see its episcopal leadership and 
spouses in quite a different role," he said. 



Custom Audio Cassette 

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segment of any plenary session for $7 per each 30-minute segment. 

Take this form to the DCA Sales Booth 



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Speal<er(s) 



April 16, 1< 



Blessed Be the Women: Be Counted! Go Tell! 



Just over 100 years ago, the first woman was seated at 
the 1892 General Conference of the Methodist Protestant 
Church. Today, women comprise nearly 35 percent of the 
1,000 delegates making decisions at the 1996 General 
Conference of The United Methodist Church. We cele- 
brate the presence of women here in Denver. We also 
encourage women to be counted, to participate fully in 
the times of discernment, prayer, and decision making. 
Women, in particular, have not always been encouraged 
to be counted. The Easter story offers one example: As 
the women returned from visiting the empty tomb, their 
witness was discounted, called "foolish." All of us partici- 
pate in different ways as we share the fruits of our differ- 
ent gifts. Some of us are more accustomed to listening 
for long periods before we speak; some of us share our 
thoughts immediately. Factors affecting persons' full par- 
ticipation may include differences in language, culture, 
and hearing and sight abilities. Certainly, old patterns 
may sometimes be difficult to change. As Christians, we 
have been called to value the contributions of members 
of the body of Christ and to trust Christ's transforming 
love to do so. Moreover, as United Methodists, we have 
committed ourselves to seeking the full and equal re- 
sponsibility and participation of women by charging the 
General Commission on the Status and Role of Women 



with challenging 'The United Methodist Church. ..to a 
continuing commitment to the full and equal responsibil- 
ity and participation of women in the total life and mission 
of the Church, sharing fully in the power and in the policy 
making at all levels of the Church's life" (Para. 2202. At 
this General Conference, the commission is providing a 
monitoring ministry in keeping with that covenant. In 
addition to tracking legislation for its potential impact on 
the status and role of women, a team of commission 
members and volmiteers will be observing legislative 
committees and plenary sessions and counting the 
number of times women and men participate in decision 
making processes. Each day in the Daily Christian Advo- 
cate, tlie commission will provide feedback that will give 
some indication of women's participation. Look for this 
"Be Counted!" box and be aware of ways in which all 
delegates may share fully and responsibly in the impor- 
tant decision making at tliis General Conference. Doubt- 
less, we may face times of tension and stress in our 
discernment, yet we will also be blessed with moments 
of tenderness and humor. The General Conmiission on 
the Status and Role of Women asks God's blessing on 
each of you asyou listen for God's voice speaking among 
you. 



"Blessed Be the Women: Be Counted!" 
Historical perspective on women's participation at General Conference 



Year Denomination 


Lay women Delegates* 


Clergy Women Delegates* 


**1888 Methodist Episcopal 


5 





#1892 Methodist Protestant 


3 


1 


1893 United Brethren 


2 





1976 United Methodist 


180 


10 


1992 United Methodist 


22 


81 


1996 United Methodist 


221 


107 



* Numbers include US conferences only; 1992 and 1996 include US and Puerto Rico. 
** No women delegates were seated. 

# Clergywomen ordained by conference, not recognized officially. 



Information provided by the General Commission on the Status and Role of Women 



Daily Edition Vol. 5 No. 1 



What to See and Do in Denver 



The Mile High City Denver is not called the "Mile High 
City" because it sits on top of a mountain. In fact, it is also 
known as the "Queen of the Plains" due to its location on 
the plain at the base of the Rocky Mountains. Those who 
come to see mountains will not be disappointed, how- 
ever. Denver's elevation (at the 15th step of the state 
capitol) is exactly 5,280 feet. 

On a clear day, you can see Pikes Peak near Colorado 
Springs and all the way to the Wyoming border, a pano- 
rama that includes over 1 ,000 peaks more than two-miles 
high. 

While Denver's economy is primarily based on the 
energy industry, tourism is its second major industry. 
Half of Colorado's acreage is publicly owiied, wilJi exten- 
sive areas of spectacular scenery open to hiking, fishing, 
camping, and cross-country skiing. 

The state has two national parks, six national monu- 
ments, 11 national forests, three national recreation ar- 
eas, and 30 state parks. 

Initially a staging area for the 1859 gold rush about 10 
years after the gold rush in California, the city was 
established as a mining camp after a few flakes of gold 
were found. 

The first building was a saloon. However, after sizable 
claims were mined at Central City and Cripple Creek, 
increasing numbers of new millionaires began to make 
their homes in Denver. 

Although Denver is generally viewed as a western city, 
it is only 346 miles from the geographic center of the U.S. 
Population has doubled since the 1960's, and the city is 
second only to Washington, D.C., m the number of 
college graduates per capita. 

Many delegate shave already walked through the trou- 
bled but beautiful new Denver airport that opened 13 
months ago. Early problems with a costly baggage-han- 
dling computer have been resolved, and the facility is 
impressive. Covering 53 square miles — twice the size of 
Manhattan Island — the airport will eventually be able to 
service 110 million passengers a year. 

United Methodist Denver University 
and Iliflf School of Theology 

Denver is home to United Methodist Denver Univer- 
sity and lUff School of Theology, one of the 13 United 
Methodist seminaries in the U.S. 

Museum of Western Art 

Fans of western art will also want to visit the Museum 
of Western Art that includes paintings by Frederic 
Remington and Georgia O'Keefe (open Tuesday 
through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., 1727 Tremont 
Place, 296-1880) . The role of Black cowboys, who made 
up a third of the cowboys in the great roundups on the 
Plains, is featured in the Black American West Museum. 



U.S. Mint 

Coins stamped witli a "D" are minted in Denver at the 
U.S. Mint at 320 West Colfax (open weekdays, 8 a.m. to 
2:45 p.m.) . A 10-minute tour shows you how metal blanks 
become shiny new coins. 

Denver Art Museum 

Make sure you stop by the Denver Art Museum to see 
its 35,000-piece American Indian exhibit. Adjacent you'll 
find the home of Ann Evans, daughter of Colorado's 
second territorial governor (open Tuesday through Sat- 
urday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sunday from noon to 5 p.m., 100 
West 14th Avenue Parkway, 640-2793) . 

Denver Museum of Natural History 

At the Denver Museum of Natural History, your chil- 
dren will enjoy seeing one of the largest gold nuggets 
found in Colorado as well as the skeletons of prehistoric 
animals (open daily 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., 322-7009). 

Denver Zoo 

After the museum, stop by the Denver Zoo for a visit 
with some 3,000 animals representing 300 species (open 
daily 10a.m. to 5p.m., E. 23rd Ave. at Steele St. 331-4110). 



Buffalo Bill Memorial Museum and Grave 

Another thrill for young people of all ages is meeting 
unpersonators of characters fi^om the Wild West such as 
Buffalo Bill, who makes scheduled appearances at the 
Buffalo Bill Memorial Museum and Grave, atop Lookout 
Mountain in Golden, near Denver. 

Botanic Gardens 

Nature lovers may want to take a 10-minute ride east 
of downtown to Denver's Botanic Gardens (1005 York 
St., 331-4000). 

Cherry Creek MaU 

You may want to drive out to the million-square-foot 
Cherry Creek Mall, noted for Tattered Cover, a book- 
store that offers 140,000 titles. 

Gart Brothers Sports Casde 

And even though it is April, avid skiers will be able to 
take to the slopes. Gart Brothers Sports Castle, which 
claims to be the largest sporting goods store in the world, 
offers a test run down a simulated ski slope for die-hard 
enthusiasts of the sport. 



16 



April 16. 1996 




City and cimnty building graces the Denver skyline. 



Sports-minded delegates already know about the Denver 
Broncos football team, the Denver Nuggets basketball 
team , and the Colorado Rockies baseball team. It is Inily 
a majoi^league city. 









Elitch (lardens. a downtown amusement park with i 
thdn 20 ndes includuifj three roller coasters, opens v 
ends in mid April for delegates who find the need for i 
excitement than floor debdles (455-4771). 



You will want to visit historic Larimer Square (1400 
Larimer Street). The shopping center features flea mar- 
kets, craft shops, galleries, and restaurants, housed in 
buildings with gas lamps, bnck facades, and Victorian 
woodwork. Larimer Square is just off the mile-long 16th 
Street Mall, a pedestrian walkway that unifies the down- 
town. Make a stop at Gart Brothers Sports Castle, which 
claims to be the largest sporting goods store in the world. 
Even in April, you can do a test run down a simulated 
ski slope. 




Daily Edition Vol. 5 No. 1 



17 



Seating Assignments 
Voting Delegates 



Conference/ 


No. 








Conference/ 


No. 








Concordat Delegates 


Sec 


Row 


Seats 


Concordat 


Delegates 


Sec 


Row 


Seats 


Alabama-West Florida 


14 


D 


5 


1-7 


Eastern Pennsylvania 


14 


B 


7 


1-7 






D 


6 


1-7 






B 


8 


1-7 


Alaska Missionary 


2 


B 


10 


10-11 


Estonia Provisional 


2 


D 


12 


11-12 


Austria Provisional 


2 


B 


12 


7-8 


Finland-Finnish Provisional 2 


C 


10 


11-12 


Baltimore-Washington 


20 


A 


9 


1-10 


Finland-Sweden Provisional 2 


A 


1 


9-10 






A 


10 


1-10 


Florida 


28 


A 


12 


9-12 


Bicol Philippines 














A 


13 


1-12 


Provisional 


2 


B 


11 


8-9 






A 


14 


1-12 


Bulacan Philippines 


2 


B 


3 


11-12 


German East 


2 


D 


7 


9-10 


Bulgaria Provisional 


2 


D 


1 


7-8 


German North 


2 


B 


4 


11-12 


Burundi 


2 


A 


17 


11-12 






















German South 


2 


C 


9 


11-12 


California-Nevada 


12 


c 


19 


1-12 






















German Southwest 


2 


A 


18 


11-12 


California-Pacific 


16 


C 


3 


1-8 






















Great Britain 


4 


C 


3 


9-12 






c 


4 


1-8 






















Holston 


16 


D 


7 


1-8 


Caribbean/the Americas 


2 


A 


19 


9-10 






D 


8 


1-8 


Central Illinois 


16 


A 


2 


1-8 
















A 


3 


1-8 


Hungary Provisional 


2 


D 


5 


8-9 






Iowa 


22 


D 


3 


1-12 


Central Luzon 


2 


C 


6 


11-12 






£) 


A 


1-10 


Central Pennsylvania 


16 


C 

c 


17 
18 


7-12 
3-12 


Kansas East 


8 


D 


11 


1-8 












Kansas West 


10 


c 


5 


1-10 


Central Texas 


12 


B 


2 


6-12 






















Kentucky 


8 


D 


1 


9-12 






B 


3 


frlO 






D 


2 


9-12 


Central Zaire 


12 


D 


13 


1-12 






















Liberia 


8 


A 


20 


1-8 


Czech and Slovak 




















Republics 


2 


D 


5 


10-11 


Little Rock 


6 


D 


2 


1-6 


Dakotas 


4 


C 


8 


9-12 


Louisiana 


12 


B 


1 


1-12 


Denmark 


2 


D 


4 


11-12 


Louisville 


8 


A 


2 


9-12 


Desert Southwest 


6 


B 
B 


5 
6 


10-12 
10-12 


Macedonia- Yugoslavia 




A 


3 


9-12 












Provisional 


2 


C 


11 


11-12 


Detroit 


12 


B 


9 


1-12 


Memphis 


10 


D 




8-12 


East Mindanao 




















Philippines Provisional 


2 


A 


1 


7-8 






D 


10 


8-12 


East Ohio 


22 


C 


1 


1-12 


Mexico 


2 


C 


14 


11-12 






C 


2 


1-10 


Middle Philippines 


2 


A 


19 


7-8 


East Philippines 


2 


A 


10 


11-12 


Mindanao 


2 


D 


15 


9-10 


Eastern Angola 


2 


A 


18 


9-10 


Minnesota 


12 


C 


7 


1-12 



18 














April 16 


, 1996 


Conference/ 


No. 








Conference/ 


No. 








Concordat 


Delegates 


Sec 


Row 


Seats 


Concordat 


Delegates 


Sec 


Row 


Seats 


Mississippi 


18 


A 


6 


1-6 


Northwest Texas 


6 


A 


17 


SIO 






A 


7 


1-6 


Norway 


2 


D 


8 


11-12 






A 


8 


1-6 


Oklahoma 


20 


C 


10 


1-10 


Missouri East 


10 


B 
B 


2 
3 


1-5 
1-5 


Oklahoma Indian 




C 


11 


1-10 


Missouri West 


10 


D 


16 


1-10 


Missionary 


2 


C 


18 


1-2 


Mozambique 


2 


C 


13 


11-12 


Oregon-Idaho 


6 


B 


14 


1-6 












Pacific Northwest 


8 


D 


20 


1-8 


Nebraska 


10 


C 


14 


1-10 






















Palawan Provisional 


2 


D 


6 


10-11 


New England 


14 


D 


9 


1-7 
















D 


10 


1-7 


Peninsula-Delaware 


8 


C 


6 


3-10 






Philippines 


2 


D 


6 


8-9 


New Mexico 


4 


C 


4 


9-12 






















Poland 


2 


C 


2 


11-12 


New York 


16 


A 


4 


1-8 
















A 
D 


5 
11 


1-8 
9-12 


Puerto Rico 


2 


D 


7 


11-12 


Nigeria 


4 


Red Bird Missionary 


2 


B 


15 


11-12 












Rio Grande 


2 


B 


12 


9-10 


North Alabama 


14 


A 


4 


9-12 
















A 


5 


9-12 


Rocky Mountain 


10 


B 


4 


1-10 












Sierra Leone 


2 


D 


2 


7-8 






A 


6 


7-12 






















South Carolina 


22 


B 


21 


1-12 


North Arkansas 


8 


A 


18 


1-8 






B 


22 


1-10 


North Carolina 


18 


B 


5 


1-9 
















B 


6 


1-9 


South Georgia 


14 


B 
B 


19 
20 


1-8 
1-6 


North Central 




















New York 


10 


D 


12 


1-10 


South Indiana 


16 


c 


8 


1-8 


North Central 














C 


9 


1-8 


Philippines 


2 


B 


19 


11-12 


Southern Illinois 


6 


D 


1 


1-6 


North Georgia 


24 


B 
B 


16 
17 


1-12 
1-12 


Southern New Jersey 


10 


c 


13 


1-10 






Southern Zaire 


10 


D 


19 


7-12 


North Indiana 


14 


A 


7 


7-12 






D 


20 


9-12 






A 
A 


8 
9 


7-12 
11-12 


Southwest Philippines 


2 


B 


14 


9-10 






Southwest Texas 


10 


B 


15 


1-10 


North Shaba 


16 


A 


11 


1-8 


Sweden 


2 


D 


15 


11-12 






A 


12 


1-8 


Switzerland-France 


2 


B 


19 


9-10 


North Texas 


12 


B 


18 


1-12 


Tanganyika 


2 


A 


11 


9-10 


Northeast Philippines 


2 


B 


14 


7-8 


Tennessee 


10 


B 


7 


8-12 


Northeast Zaire 


2 


B 


11 


10-11 






B 


8 


8-12 


Northern Illinois 


14 


B 
B 


10 
11 


1-7 
1-7 


Texas 


24 


C 

c 


20 
21 


1-12 
1-12 


Northern New Jersey 


6 


A 


1 


1-6 


Troy 
Upper Zaire 


6 


B 


20 


7-12 


Northern Philippines 


2 


A 


1 


11-12 


2 


D 


8 


9-10 


Northwest Philippines 


2 


B 


10 


8-9 













Daily Edition Vol. 5 No. 1 



Conference/ 


No. 








Conference/ 


No. 








Concordat Delegates 


Sec 


Row 


Seats 


Concordat Delegates 


Sec 


Row 


Seats 


Virginia 


30 


C 


15 


1-12 


C. David Lundquist 




D 


22 


6 






c 


16 


1-12 


Bruce Robbins 




D 


22 


7 






c 


17 


1-6 


Roger Ireson 




D 


22 


8 


Visayas-North Mindanao 
Philippines 










Barbara Thompson 




D 


22 


9 


2 


c 


9 


9-10 






















Ezra Earl Jones 




D 


22 


10 


West Michigan 


13 


B 


10 


1-10 


Stephanie Hixon 




D 


22 


11 


West Middle 




















Philippines 


2 


c 


5 


11-12 


Cecelia Long 




D 


22 


12 


West Ohio 


30 


D 


17 


1-12 


Robert K Feaster 




D 


21 


11 






D 


18 


1-12 


Charles Yrigoyen 




D 


21 


12 






D 


19 


1-6 


Affiliated Autonomous Methodist 




West Virginia 


16 


A 


21 


1-10 


and United Churches 










A 


22 


1-6 


Methodist Church 










West Zaire 


2 


A 


11 


11-12 


of Argentina 


2 


A 


19 


11-12 


Western Angola 


4 


B 


12 


11-12 


United Methodist Church 




















Belgium 


2 


A 


20 


9-10 






B 


13 


11-12 


The Methodist Church 










Western New York 


6 


A 


19 


1-6 


in Brazil 


3 


A 


22 


7-9 


Western North 










The Methodist Church 










Carolina 


28 


A 


15 


1-12 


in Burma 


2 


A 


20 


11-12 






A 


16 


1-12 


Methodist Church in Cuba 


2 


B 


22 


11-12 






A 


17 


1-4 


United Evangelical Church 
Ecuador 


2 


C 


22 


1-2 


Western Pennsylvania 


20 


D 


14 


1-12 












Methodist Church, 














D 


15 


1-8 


Hong Kong 


2 


C 


22 


3-4 


Wisconsin 


12 


C 


12 


1-12 


Methodist Church 










Wyoming 


6 


B 


12 


1-6 


in India 


3 


A 


22 


10-12 


Yellowstone 


2 


B 


14 


11-12 


Methodist Church 
in Indonesia 


2 


C 


22 


5-6 


Zimbabwe 


2 


C 


6 


1-2 


Korean Methodist Church 


3 


D 


21 


1-3 


Russian Observers 


2 


D 


16 


11-12 


Methodist Church 




















in Malaysia 


3 


D 


21 


4-6 


General Secretaries 






Evangelical Methodist 










Sandra K. Lakore 




D 


22 


1 


Church-Philippines 


2 


C 


22 


7-8 


Judith Weidman 




D 


22 


2 


Methodist Church- 
Republic of China 


2 


C 


22 


9-10 


Thorn White Wolf Fassett 




D 


22 


3 


Evangelical Methodist 










Barbara Boigegrain 




D 


22 


4 


Church of Costa Rica 


2 


c 


22 


11-12 


Neil Alexander 




D 


22 


5 


The Methodist Church 
of Singapore 


2 


D 


21 


7-8 



B 15 



■b Q 



n 









S 2 



b a 



g 


c 


c. 


% 


3 

o 


F- 


< 


U 


< 


i^ 


i^ 


-a 








o 


a 










— 






< 


< 





^ § 



ii 

IS u 



11 



U i3 

.>.s 



11 



> e 



E 
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-2 .3 



5 ni 



E 
E _ 

5 1 
1 1 

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Q o 






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'S c 
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Daily Edition Vol. 5 No. 1 



23 



Methodist Beginnings in Colorado 



On November 16, 1858, a company of travel-weary 
settlers reached the confluence of Cherry Creek and the 
South Platte River. Among them was wagon-maker 
George W. Fisher, whose arrival in the area would 
initiate the rapid spread of Methodism throughout the 
Rocky Mountain region. 

A Methodist lay preacher, Fisher wasted no time in 
holding church services in the new settlement that soon 
became known as Denver City. The first services took 
place out-of-doors or in a rudely constructed log cabin 
that otherwise served as a gambling hall. By the follow- 
ing spring when the Kansas-Nebraska Conference sent 
the first officially-appointed Methodist leaders as mis- 
sionaries, Fisher was also preaching regularly in the 
developing mining town at Mountain (now Central) 
City. 

Early Missions Take Root 

One of the leaders sent by the Kansas-Nebraska Con- 
ference was superintendent William H. Goods, known 
as the father of Nebraska Methodism. Accompanying 
him was Jacob Adriance, who was to become known as 
the father of Methodism in Colorado and whose Diary 
is an invaluable resource for students of the early history 
of Methodism in the region. 

Working in the zeal of the Lord, Goods and Adriance 
organized the first four Methodist churches in the re- 
gion in 1859 during the space of five months: Central 
City on July 11, Golden on July 17, Denver City and 
Auraria Mission (now Trinity) on August 2, and Boulder 
on November 27. Originally established as separate 
towns on opposite banks of Cherry Creek, Denver City 
and Auraria united in 1860, taking the name of a former 
Governor of Kansas, James W. Denver. 

Included among early church leaders of this period 
were William Howbert, who came from Iowa in 1860, 
and John L. Dyer of Wisconsin, affectionately known as 
"Father." Howbert and Dyer helped organize Brecken- 
ridge, LeadviUe, Fairplay, Canon City, and Colorado 
City, which is now the western part of Colorado Springs. 
Dyer traveled widely throughout southern Colorado to 
Pueblo, Trinidad, and many other settlements. Organ- 
ized in 1863, the Rocky Mountain Conference changed 
its name the following year to the Colorado Conference. 
It again became known as the Rocky Mountain Confer- 
ence in 1957. 

A Vision for New Mexico 

As a delegate to the General Conference in 1868, Dyer 
urged the conference to send missionaries to the New 
Mexico territory. Not content to depend on others to 
take the initiative, however, he began the work in the 
"Rio Grande District" soon after his return to Colorado, 



riding his horse as far south as El Paso, Texas, and later 
into eastern Arizona to preach. Dyer estimated he had 
ridden his horse over 10,000 miles during a two-year 
period in New Mexico (1868-1870). 

When the early work in New Mexico met with little 
success. Dyer persuaded his fi-iend Thomas Harwood 
to leave Wisconsin and commit himself to this mission 
field. Harwood and his wife Emily ministered in New 
Mexico for many years, and both became fluent in 
Spanish. A school teacher, Emily helped establish a 
school that was later named after them. 

After the New Mexico Mission separated from the 
Colorado Conference in 1872, Thomas Harwood was 
named superintendent over five churches with a total of 
74 members. When the New Mexico Mission divided 
into English- and Spanish-speaking sections in 1884, 
with 8 and 16 churches respectively, Harwood became 
superintendent of the Spanish-speaking division. 

The Work Expands into Wyoming 

Even before the work in New Mexico began, John 
Dyer dreamed of expanding mission outreach to Wyo- 
ming in spite of the fact that there were few pennanent 
settlements in that region. As a result of that vision, the 
first Methodist church in Wyoming was established in 
Cheyenne, Dakota Territory in 1867, the same year the 
town was organized. 

The following year a Methodist church also began 
meeting in Laramie. These two churches made up the 
Dakota District of southern Wyoming. Rev. W. W. Bald- 
win of the Colorado Conference and Dr. G. F. HOton, a 
physician and retired minister from Wisconsin, were the 
first preachers in Cheyenne and Laramie respectively. 
In conjunction with Greeley, Colorado, these towns 
made up tlie first circuit in the region. 

The main expansion of the Colorado Conference in 
Wyoming followed the development of railroad camps 
during the construction of the Union Pacific Railroad 
through southern Wyoming in the 1870's. By 1888, witli 
new churches taking root in Rawlins, Rock Springs, and 
Evanston, the Wyoming Mission Conference had grown 
large enough to separate fi-om the Colorado Confer- 
ence. 

A Period of Prosperity 

The year 1870 inaugurated a period of steady growth 
for Denver. Linked that year to the transcontinental 
railroad at Cheyenne, the town's dependence on mining 
and gold speculation increasingly gave way to farming 
and ranching interests. Denver's prosperity benefited 
the church as well. When Henry White Warren came 
to Denver in 1884 as the first resident bishop, the con- 



24 



April 16, 1996 



ference included 51 churches, 15 of which were in Den- 
ver, with 4 in Wyoming. 

John L. Dyer retired in 1880 after a lifetime of profit- 
able service for the Methodist Church and for the Lord. 
He died in Denver in 1901 at the age of 89. Dyer's 
memory is preserved in the name of the Breckenridge 
church where he last served and by his likeness in a 
stained glass window recognising early pioneers in the 
State Capitol building. 

The Methodist Episcopal Church, South 

The same year Howbert came to Denver, 1860, a 
congregation of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South 
also organized; this congregation erected the town's 
first church building. With the outbreak of the Civil War 
the following year, however, most of the members re- 
turned to their homes in southern states, and the work 
disbanded. Reorganized in Denver in 1871, Methodist 
Church, South congregations in Colorado primarily con- 
centrated in the southern half of the state where they 
were closely tied to that denomination's development in 
New Mexico. 

Different Langu^e Churches 

A number of non-English-speaking Methodist 
churches affiliated with other conferences developed in 
Denver during the latter part of the 1 800's. West German 
Conference Methodists established a church in 1872 
under the leadership of such men as lay leader Henry 
Reitze, eventually disbanding in 1926. In 1883, the North 
Western Swedish Annual Conference organized a con- 
gregation of Swedish-speaking Methodists that joined 
the Colorado Conference when the Swedish Conference 
disbanded following the 1939 merger. 

Throughout the first two decades of the 20th century, 
Japanese Methodists, Italian Methodists, and Spanish- 
speaking Methodists added their own congregations. 
Afi-ican-Americans organized a church related to the 
Methodist Episcopal denomination in 1904. One of its 
ministers, Matthew Clair, Jr., a graduate of lliff School 
of Theology, was elected bishop in the Central Jurisdic- 
tion in 1952. Trinity Methodist Church maintained a 
Chinese Sunday school in the early years, as did the 
Methodist Episcopal, South denomination. 

The University of Denver 

From the beginning, the early settlers of the region 
considered education a priority. Led by former Gover- 
nor John Evans, several Methodist laymen organized 
the Colorado Seminary in 1864, the first institution of 



higher education in the mountain region. Although the 
struggling institution closed its doors after four years, a 
new board of trustees established the University of 
Denver in 1880, again under Evans' influence and guid- 
ance. Its first chancellor, David H. Moore, was later 
elected bishop. 

Within 10 years, hampered by limited space for expan- 
sion, the University of Denver relocated to South Den- 
ver, which was at that time many miles outside the city 
limits. The most significant period of development in the 
early part of the century came under the guidance of 
Chancellor Henry Augustus Buchtel during a 21-year 
period from 1900 to 1920. Five new buildings were 
consbiicted as the student body and faculty grew signifi- 
cantly. 

The IliflF School of Theology 

In the late 1800's a local businessman and cattle baron 
began to dream of a school to train ministers. Although 
John Wesley lliff died too young to bring his idea to 
fruition, his vision became reality through the efforts of 
his widow, Elizabeth lliff, after she married Bishop 
Henry White Warren in 1883. 

Initially, the lliff School was a graduate division of the 
University. When the first class enrolled in 1892, the 
students met in University Hall, the only building on 
campus at that time. Almost immediately, however, John 
and Elizabeth's son, William Seward lliff, provided funds 
to construct lliff Hall. Classes moved into the new build- 
ing in September 1893. 

Financial difficulties, added to other challenges, 
caused lliff School to close fi-om 1900 to 1910. During 
this decade the endowment increased, however, allow- 
ing the school to reopen in 1903 incorporated separately 
from the University. 

Heroes of the Faith 

The words of B. F. Crary, who served 8 years as a 
presiding elder of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South during these early years, are a fitting tribute to all 
the men and women who labored so faithfully to preach 
the gospel in the Rocky Mountain region. Writijig in 
1880 of the hardships and trials of the work of that 
period, he concluded, "Our only regret was, all the time, 
that we could not plant more churches and send out 
more preachers. No more heroic men ever lived than 
our glorious cohort of frontier preachers. They deserve 
immortality and eternal life." 

— /. Alton Templin 



Daily Edition Vol. 5 No. 1 



Additional Delegates 



Burundi (2) 

Nahimana, Mary (4), women's leader, P.O. Box 64583, Nai- 
robi, Kenya 

*Ntaboneka, Simeon (10), president, P.O. Box 64583, Nai- 
robi, Kenya 

Reserves 

Menyereye, Emmanuel, secretary, P.O. Box 64583, Nairobi, 

Kenya 
Niyizigama, Amos, president, P.O. Box 64583, Nairobi, 

Kenya 

Caribbean and the Americas (2) 

Cooke, Victor ( ) , conference treasurer. Deal Gardens, Max- 
well, Christ Church, Barbados, West Indies 

Watty, William W. (6) , conference president, Methodist Con- 
ference Centre, P.O. Box 9, Scott's Hill, St. John's, An- 
tigua, West Indies 



Liberia (8) 

Cox, Sr., Lamark J. (3), conference lay leader, P.O. Box 10- 

1010, 1000 Monrovia 10, Liberia 
Dassama, Sr., Moussa A. (5) , administrator, P.O. Box 10- 

1010, 1000 Monrovia 10, Liberia 
Logan, Comfort N. (2), administrator, P.O. Box 10-1010, 

1000 Monrovia 10, Liberia 
Jackson, Jr. W. Nippy T. (4) , administrator, P.O. Box 10- 

1010, 1000 Monrovia 10, Liberia 
*Junius, Nathan D. (1), council director, P.O. Box 10-1010, 

1000 Monrovia 10, Uberia 
Kpaan, Anna S. (10), district superintendent, P.O. Box 10- 

1010, 1000 Monrovia 10, Liberia 
Nelson, Jr., Julius S. (6) , youth/young adult director, P.O. 

Box 10-1010, 1000 Monrovia 10, Uberia 
Kpaan, Momoh S. (7), real estates coordinator, P.O. Box 10- 

1010, 1000 Monrovia 10, Liberia 

Reserves 

Ross-Bedell, Agatha, local church lay leader, P.O. Box 10- 

1010, 1000 Monrovia 10, Liberia 
Solunteh, James K., businessman, P.O. Box 10-1010, 1000 

Monrovia 10, Liberia 
Karmbor, Sr., James W., C.W.A. president, P.O. Box 10- 

1010, 1000 Monrovia 10, Liberia 
Goodridge, Emmett W., instructor, P.O. Box 10-1010, 1000 

Monrovia 10, Liberia 



Mexico (2) 

Bravo, Gilberto (), conference secretary, 4 Poniente#311, 

72000 Puebla, Pue. Mexico 
Travino, Luis Ernesto (), conference president, Matamoros 

#111 Ote., 26000 Piedras Negras, Coah., Mexico 

Nigeria (4) 

Dambura, Anthony (5), attorney, P.O. Box 155, Jalingo, 
Taraba State, Nigeria 



Istakanus, Rifkatu (8), homemaker, P.O. Box 155, Jalingo, 

Taraba State, Nigeria 
*Ntoriko, Hananiah (3), pastor, P.O. Box 155, Jalingo, 

Taraba State, Nigeria 
Zoreno.Adiel (10), pastor, P.O. Box 155, Jalingo, Taraba 

State, Nigeria 

North Central Philippines (2) 

Beltran, Olive (4) , deaconess, St. Paul United Methodist 

Church, Cabagan, Isabela, Philippines 
*Inere, Oscar C. (5), district superintendent, 137, Velridge 

Subdivision, Echague, Isabela 3309, Philippines 

Reserves 

Quidasol, Bienvenido M., The United Methodist Church, 
Roxas, Isabela, Philippines 

Cayaba, Warlito 

Cayaba, Victorio 

Salacup, Rolando 

Tumanagan, Maximo 

Haduca, Herminigildo 

Pardon, Samuel 

Tandayu, Silvestre 

Octaviano, Lito 

Sadang, Nelson 

Velasco, Virgilio 

Ramos, Jose 

Pascasio, Hedelyn 

Balisi, Elisio 

Ramos, Rolando 

Tandayu, Primitive G., district superintendent. The United 
Methodist Church, Osmena, llagan, Isabela 3300, Philip- 
pines 

Pascasio, Jovita, district superintendent, The United Meth- 
odist Church, Cauayan, Isabela, Philippines 

Cayaba, Pablo, pastor. The United Methodist Church, Sta. 
Cruz, Echague, Isabela, Philippines 

Adduru, Pablo, dean, Eveland Junior College, San Mateo, Is- 
abela, Philippines 

Pascasio, Arnold, pastor 

Pascasio, Marceliano, director, Rural Life Center, Euro, lla- 
gan, Isabela, Philippines 

Maggay, Erwyn, pastor. The United Methodist Church, Cen- 
tre, Cabagan, Isabela, Philippines 

Rasing, Medardo, pastor. The United Methodist Church, 
Kalabaza, Aurora, Isabela, Philippines 

Jacinto, Felipa, UTS, Dasmarinas, Cavite, Philippines 

Castillo, Melanio, pastor/teacher, Eveland Junior College, 
San Mateo, Isabela, Philippines 

Hay, Salvador, pastor. The United Methodist Church, Virgi- 
neza, San Agustin, Isabela, Philippines 

Rinonos, Edwin, pastor. The United Methodist Church,Tu- 
mauini, Isabela, Philippines 

Callantes, Honorato, pastor. The United Methodist Church, 
San Mateo, Isabela, Philippines 

Pacudan, Antonio, UTS, Dasmarinas, Cavite, Philippines 

Inis, Ralph, pastor. The United Methodist Church, 
Echague, Isabela, Philippines 

Inis, Rodolfo, pastor 

Domingo, Lolita, pastor 

Dela Cruz, Elizabeth, pastor, The United Methodist Church, 
Bagong Tanza, Aurora, Isabela, Philippines 



26 



April 16, 1996 



Maggay, Nena, pastor, The United Methodist Church, San 
Antonio, Delfin Albano, Isabela, Philippines 

Northeast Philippines (2) 

Roque, Luzviminda P. (10), physician. The United Method- 
ist Church, Santiago City, Isabela, Philippines 

*Villaluz, Artemio M. (3), district superintendent. The 
United Methodist Church, Santiago City, Isabela, Philip- 
pines 

Reserves 

Caluya, Hector, engineer. The United Methodist Church, 
Maddela, Quirino, Philippines 

Satumo, Adriana, D.N.R. officer. The United Metliodist 
Church, Buenavista, Santiago City, Isabela, Philippines 

Tubayan, Jose, board member, The United Methodist 
Church, Bambang, North Vizcaya, Philippines 

Miguel, Samuel, businessman, Baptista Village, Santiago 
City, Isabela, Philippines 

Jose, Antonio, engineer, Baptista village, Santiago City, Isa- 
bela, Philippines 

Leano, Byron, instructor. The United Methodist Church, 
Bayombong, Nueva Vizcaya, Philippines 

Galindez, Minerva, teacher, The United Methodist Church, 
Aritao, Nueva Vizcaya, Philippines 

Ibay, Arleen, accountant, The United Methodist Church, Di- 
visoria, Santiago City, Isabela, Philippines 

Villanueva, Castulo, The United Methodist Church, Solano, 
Nueva Vizcaya, Philippines 

Madelar, Nieves, teacher, Aldersgate, Solano, Nueva 
Vizcaya, Philippines 

Gabuyo, Esther, deaconess. The United Methodist Church, 
Solano, Nueva Vizcaya, Philippines 

Jerusalem, Beverly, accountant, The United Methodist 
Church, Bayombong, Nueva Vizcaya, Philippines 

Jacquias, Leah, The United Methodist Church, Solano, 
Nueva Vizcaya, Philippines 

Galam, Lourdes, professor. The United Methodist Church, 
Bayombong, Nueva Vizcaya, Philippines 

Villaluz, Fc Paulina R., The United Methodist Church, Santi- 
ago City, Isabela, Philippines 

Cabotaje, Virginia, businesswoman, 32 Malvar Street, Santi- 
ago City, Philippines 

Soriano, Ernesto C. , district superintendent, The United 
Methodist Church District Parsonage, Gen Trias Street, 
Buag, Bambang, Nueva Vizcaya, Philippines 

Cabotaje, Paul G., administrative pastor, The United Meth- 
odist Church, Bayombong, Nueva Vizcaya, Philippines 

Justo, Benjamin, dean, UTS, Dasmarinas, Cavite, Philippines 

Erana, Samuel F. , pastor. The United Methodist Church, 
Diffun Quirino, Philippines 

Dado, Luz B. , pastor. The United Methodist Church, Sta. 
Fe, Nueva Vizcaya, Philippines 

Olonan, Virgilio C, district superintendent, The United 
Methodist Church, District Parsonage, 9 Jose Abad San- 
tos Street, Bayombong, Nueva Vizcaya, Philippines 

Sagadraca, Wilson E., district superintendent, 128 Velasco 
Subdivision, San Fabian, Echague, Isabela, Philippines 

Gallo, Luis A. , pastor. The United Methodist Church, Bam- 
bang, Nueva Vizcaya, Philippines 

Benitez,Juan Ri., pastor, The United Methodist Church, Ari- 
tao, Nueva Vizcaya, Philippines 

Bisis, Zenaida C. , pastor. The United Methodist Church, 
Diadi, Nueva Vizcaya, Philippines 

Lorenzana, Balligi J., pasior, The United Methodist Church, 
Maddela, Quirino, Philippines 



Antonio, Luz G., pastor. The United Methodist Church, Am- 

balatungan, Santiago City, Philippines 
Luna, Elmer v., pasloT, The United Methodist Church, Bon- 

fal, Nueva Vizcaya, Philippines 
Larida, Franklin M., pastor. The United Methodist Church, 

Bagabag, Nueva Vizcaya, Philippines 
Sebastian, Romulo i?., pastor. The United Methodist 

Church, Buenavista, Santiago City, Philippines 
Gabuyo, Severino, pastor. The United Methodist Church, 

Santiago City, Isabela, Philippines 

Northern Philippines (2) 

Caypuno, Sr., David A. (4), principal. Northern Philippine 

Academy, Gattaran, Cagayan, Philippines 
*Granado, Simplicio T. (8), district superintendent. The 
United Methodist Church, Tuao, Cagayan 3528, Phlippi- 



Reserves 

Quilang, Remedios Y., teacher, Methodist Mission School 
for Church Ministry, 57 College Avenue, Tuguegarao, Ca- 
gayan, Philippines 

Guzman, Felbc, underwriter, Centro I, Tuao, Cagayan, Philip- 
pines 

Binasoy, Celia R., government employee. The United Meth- 
odist Church, Tuguegarao, Cagayan, Philippines 

Salvatierra, Lorna B., administrative officer, COA, Carig, 
Tugeugarao, Cagayan, Philippines 

Dela Cruz, Lourdita B., executive secretary, 900 United Na- 
tions Avenue, Manila, Philippines 

Crismo, Phoebe, deaconess 

Siazon, Aida, teacher. The United Methodist Church, 
Sanchez Mira, Cagayan, Philippines 

Asanias, Herman, physician. The United Methodist Church, 
Sanchez Mira, Cagayan, Philippines 

Asanias, Lily, nurse. The United Methodist Church, 
Sanchez Mira, Cagayan, Philippines 

Caypono, Lydia J., teacher, NPA, Gattaran, Cagayan, Philip- 
pines 

Quilang, Benjamin L, teacher, JWC, Tuguegarao, Cagayan, 
Philippines 

Gaspar, Samuel, teacher, CSU, Tuguegarao, Cagayan, Phil- 
ippines 

Malana, Glomar, The United Methodist Church, 
Tuguegarao, Cagayan, Philippines 

Calayan, Domingo, retired major. The United Methodist 
Church, linao, Tuguegarao, Cagayan, Philippines 

Gonzaga, Thelma R., school supervisor, The United Method- 
ist Church, Tuguegarao, Cagayan, Philippines 

Factora, Corazon T., teacher, CNHS, Tuguegarao, Cagayan, 
Philippines 

Racquel, Boyser, teacher. The United Methodist Church, 
Bangan, Sanchez Mira, Philippines 

Ferrer, Violeta, teacher, UMCS, Tuguegarao, Cagayan, Phil- 
ippines 

Ferrer, Oscar C. , district superintendent, The United Meth- 
odist Church, District Parsonage, 69Tanza, Tuguegarao, 
Cagayan, Philippines 

Santiago, Rebecca, pastor. The United Methodist Church, 
Maddarulog, Cagayan, Philippines 

Balunsat, Norina, pastor. The United Methodist Church, 
Talinganay, Tuao, Cagayan, Philippines 

Ladia, Nelson, pastor. The United Methodist Church, 
Sanchez Mira, Cagayan, Philippines 

Martinez, Samuel, pastor. The United Methodist Church, 
Aparri, Cagayan, Philippines 



Daily Edition Vol. 5 No. 1 



Rumias, Roy, pastor, The United Methodist Church, Tuao, 
Cagayan, Philippines 

Torida, Crisostomo, pastor, UTS, Dasmarinas, Cavite, Philip- 
pines 

Udasco, Chita, pastor, The United Methodist Church, 
Buguey (West), Cagayan, Philippines 

Factora, Jacinto, director, Methodist School for Church Min- 
istry, 57 College Avenue, Tuguegarao, Cagayan, Philip- 
pines 

Ferrer, Fidel, pastor. The United Methodist Church, 15 Boni- 
facio Street, Tuguegarao, Cagayan, Philippines 

Javier, Marjorie, pastor, The United Methodist Church, 
Afusing, Alcala, Cagayan, Philippines 

Tolentino, Elwyn, district superintendent, 69Tanza, 
Tuguegarao, Cagayan, Philippines 

Taberlo, Esperlita, pastor. The United Methodist Church, 
Ballesteros, Cagayan, Philippines 

Baquiran, Bonifer, pastor. The United Methodist Church, 
15 Bonifacio Street, Tuguegarao, Cagayan, Philippines 

Cueto, Hermenigildo, pastor. The United Methodist Church, 
15 Bonifacio Street, Tuguegarao, Cagayan, Philippines 

Pico, Rodel, pastor. The United Methodist Church, Dugo, 
Camalaniugan, Cagayan, Philippines 

Miguel, Modesto, pastor, The United Methodist Church, Cat- 
taggaman, Tuguegarao, Cagayan, Philippines 

Northwest Philippines (2) 

Dayap, Efren (4) , government employee, Bugnay, Candon, 

Ilocos Sur, Philippines 
*Lumanang, Romeo (10), district superintendent, The 

United Methodist Church, District Parsonage, Binalonan, 

Pangasinan, Philippines 

Reserves 

Jaramilla, Manuel A., government employee. The United 
Methodist Church, Caparia-an, Sta. Cruz, Ilocos Sur, Phil- 
ippines 

Rapanut, Carlo A., office worker. The United Methodist 
Church, 10 Marcos Highway, Baguio City, Philippines 

Bang-asan, Violy, deaconess. The United Methodist 
Church, 10 Marcos Highway, Baguio City, Philippines 

Framo, Chita, deaconess. The United Methodist Church, 
900 United Nations Avenue, Manila, Philippines 

Quinit, Trinidad, The United Methodist Church, Pinmilapil, 
Sison, Pangasinan, Philippines 

Quidangen, Ciony, The United Methodist Church, Candon, 
Ilocos Sur, Philippines 

Balingoay, Felomina, The United Methodist Church, 10 
Marcos Highway, Baguio City, Philippines 

Taoaguen, Rosemarie, student. The United Methodist 
Church, 10 Marcos Highway, Baguio City, Philippines 

Turgano, Benjamin, The United Methodist Church. Sta. 
Cruz, Ilocos Sur, Philippines 

Valera, Alejandrino,The United Methodist Church, 10 Mar- 
cos Highway, Baguio City, Philippines 

Valera, Caridad, The United Methodist Church, 10 Marcos 
Highway, Baguio City, Philippines 

Delia, Mario 

Galazo, Clarita, The United Methodist Church, Balidbid, Sal- 
cedo, Ilocos Sur, Philippines 

Roldan, Leonardo, The United Methodist Church, San Este- 
ban, Ilocos Sur, Philippines 

Belen, Roily, The United Methodist Church, Lungog, Narva- 
can, Ilocos Sur, Philippines 

Ortiz, Carlos, The United Methodist Church, Babayoan, Sta. 
Cruz, Ilocos Sur, Philippines 



Tallayo, Jolly, The United Methodist Church. Banayoyo, Ilo- 
cos Sur, Philippines 

Lumanang, Honorata, housewife. The United Methodist 
Church, Bugayong, Binalonan, Pangasinan 

Laconsay, Leah, The United Methodist Church, San Nico- 
las, Pangasinan, Philippines 

Torio, Sr., Pedro, district superintendent. The United Meth- 
odist Church, District Parsonage, Santiago, Ilocos Sur, 
Philippines 

Bang-asan, Clemente, pastor, The United Methodist 
Church, 10 Marcos Highway, Baguio City 2600, Philip- 
pines 

Belen, Luz, pastor. The United Methodist Church, Lungog, 
Narvacan, Ilocos Sur, Philippines 

Caalim, Teofilo, pastor. The United Methodist Church, 
Tayug, Pangasinan, Philippines 

Romero, Leopoldo, pastor. The United Methodist Church, 
Sevilla, Sta. Cruz, Ilocos Sur, Philippines 

Viloria, Manuel, pastor. The United Methodist Church, 
Bugayong, Binalonan, Pangasinan, Philippines 

Dampulay, Conrado, pastor. The United Methodist Church, 
Sto. Tomas, Candon, Ilocos Sur, Philippines 

Serquina, Sr., Pedro, pastor, The United Methodist Church, 
Resales, Pangasinan, Philippines 

Taoaguen, Bonifacio, pastor. The United Methodist Church, 
Banayoyo, Ilocos Sur, Philippines 

Amarillo, Samuel, pastor, The United Methodist Church, 
Pozzorrubio, Pangasinan, Philippines 

Biteng, Henry, pastor. The United Methodist Church, San 
Jose, Sta. Cruz, Ilocos Sur, Philippines 

Curameng, Isagani, pastor. The United Methodist Church, 
Urdaneta, Pangasinan, Philippines 

Guzman, Merlita, pastor, The United Methodist Church, 
Narvacan, Ilocos Sur, Philippines 

Espanto, Pedro, district superintendent. The United Method- 
ist Church, District Parsonage, Calaoa-an, Candon, Ilocos 
Sur, Philippines 

Valdez, Rodolfo, pastor. The United Methodist Church, 
Padaoil, Sta. Cruz, Ilocos Sur, Philippines 

Refuerzo, Homer, pastor, UTS Dasmarinas, Cavite, Philip- 
pines 

Valedo, Federico, district superintendent. The United Meth- 
odist Church, District Parsonage, San Pedro West, 
Resales Pangasinan, Philippines 

Valera, David, pastor, The United Methodist Church, 10 
Marcos Highway, Baguio City 2600, Philippines 

Mangornong, Rebecca, pastor, TTie United Methodist 
Church, Caparria-an, Sta. Cruz, Ilocos Sur, Philippines 

Zimbabwe (2) 

Zvinoira, John ( ), businessman, 17 Cripps Road, Palmer- 

ston, Mutare, Zimbabwe 
Mafondokoto, Jairus (), headmaster. Old Mutare Centre, 

P.B. P7024, Mutare, Zimbabwe 

Reserves 

Kangara, Pedzisai, headmaster, P. Bag 662, Mutare, Zim- 
babwe 

Mutize, Peter, headmaster. Box 83, Mutoko, Zimbabwe 

Mutasa, Beatrice, lecturer, 32 Marimba Park, Mufakose, 
Harare, Zimbabwe 

Chikuni, Eliatha, teacher, Newengo School, P. Bag J7115, 
Mutare, Zimbabwe 

Marima, William P., businessman, 145 Third Avenue, Park 
Town, Waterfalls, Harare, Zimbabwe 



April 16, 1996 



Machuma, Shepherd K., management trainer, 9 Manda 
Street, Zengeza 3, Chitungwiza, Zimbabwe 

Bandajosephat C, principal. Box H97, Hatfield, Harare, 
Zimbabwe 

Masamba, Mary, district superintendent, P. Bag, Murewa, 
Zimbabwe 



Marange, Kennedy, district superintendent. Box 236, 
Mutoko, Zimbabwe 

Machinga, Gift K, pastor. Box 666, Mutare, Zimbabwe 

Munjoma.John F., district superintendent. Box 386, 
Mitchell's Plain, 7785 South Africa 

Mwandira, Kelvin, pastor, Georgia House, Box 8086, Bel- 
mont, Bulawayo, Zimbabwe 



Alphabetical List of Additional Voting Delegates and Reserves 



Remove: Allen, Robert L. (Oklahoma) 

Anderson, Gail 0. (Wyoming) 

Lee, Kum (New England) 

Olive, George E. (Northern New Jersey) 

Underwood, Cecil H. (West Virginia) 

Add: Adduru, Pablo (North Central Philippines) 

Amarillo, Samuel (Northwest Philippines) 

Antonio, Luz G. (Northeast Philippines) 

Asanias, Herman (Northern Philippines) 

Asanias, Lily (Northern Philippines) 

Balingoay, Felomina (Northwest Philippines) 

Balisi, Elisio (North Central Philippines) 

Balunsat, Norina (Northern Philippines) 

Banda, Josephat C. (Zimbabwe) 

Bang-asan, Clemente (Nortliwest Philippines) 

Bang-asan, Violy (Northwest Philippines) 

Baquiran, Bonifer (Northern Philippines) 

Belen, Holly (Northwest Philippines) 

Belen, Luz (Northwest Philippines) 

Beltran, Olive (North Central Philippines) 

Benitez,Juan Ri. (Northeast Philippines) 

Binasoy, Celia R. (Northern Philippines) 

Bisis, Zenaida C. (Northeast Philippines) 

Biteng, Henry (Northwest Philippines) 

Bravo, Gilberto (Mexico) 

Caalim, Teofilo (Northwest Philippines) 

Cabotaje, Paul G. Northeast Philippines) 

Cabotaje, Virginia (Northeast Philippines) 

Calayan, Domingo (Northern Philippines) 

Callantes, Honorato (North Central Philippines) 

Caluya, Hector (Northeast Philippines) 

Castillo, Melanio (North Central Philippines) 

Cayaba, Pablo (North Central Philippines) 

Cayaba, Victorio (NorUi Central Philippines) 

Cayaba, Warlito (North Central Philippines) 

Caypuno, David T. (Northern Philippines) 

Caypuno, Lydia J. (Northern Philippines) 

Chikuni, Eliatha (Zimbabwe) 

Cooke, Victor (Caribbean and the Americas) 

Cox, Sr., Lamark J. (Liberia) 

Crismo, Phoebe (Northern Philippines) 

Cueto, Hermenigildo (Northern Philippines) 

Curameng, Isagani (Northwest Philippines) 

Dado, Luz B. (Northeast Philippines) 

Dambura, Anthony (Nigeria) 

Dampulay, Conrado (Northwest Philippines) 

Dassama, Sr., Moussa A. (Liberia) 

Dayap, Efren (Northwest Philippines) 

Dela Cruz, Elizabeth (North Central Philippines) 

Dela Cruz, Lourdita B. (Northern Philippines) 

Delia, Mario (Northwest Philippines) 

Domingo, Lolita (North Central Philippines) 

Elmiger, Linda S. (Northern New Jersey) 

Erana, Samuel F. (Northeast Philippines) 

Espanto, Pedro (Northwest Philippines) 



Factora, Corazon T. (Northern Philippines) 

Factora, Jacinto (Northern Philippines) 

Falvey, Frank (New England) 

Ferrer, Oscar C. (Northern Philippines) 

Ferrer, Fidel (Northern Philippines) 

Ferrer, Violeta (Northern Philippines) 

Flanagan, Janet L. (West Virginia) 

Framo, Chita (Northwest Philippines) 

Gabuyo, Esther (Northeast Philippines) 

Gabuyo, Severino (Northeast Philippines) 

Galam, Lourdes (Northeast Philippines) 

Galazo, Clarita (Northwest Philippines) 

Galindez, Minerva (Northeast Philippines) 

Gallo, Luis A. (Northeast Philippines) 

Caspar, Samuel (Northern Philippines) 

Gonzaga, Thelma R. (Northern Philippines) 

Goodridge, Emmett W. (Liberia) 

Granado, Simplicio T. (Northern Philippines) 

Guzman, Felix (Northern Philippines) 

Guzman, Merlita (Northwest Philippines) 

Haduca, Herminigildo (North Central Philippines) 

Ibay, Arleen (Northeast Philippines) 

Hay, Salvador (North Central Philippines) 

Inere, Oscar C. (North Central Philippines) 

Inis, Ralph (North Central Philippines) 

Inis, Rodolfo (North Central Philippines) 

Istakanus, Rifkatu (Nigeria) 

Jacinto, Felipa (North Central Philippines) 

Jackson,Jr.,W. Nippy T. (Liberia) 

Jacquias, Leah (Northeast Philippines) 

Jaramilla, Manuel A. (Northwest Philippines) 

Javier, Marjorie (Northern Philippines) 

Jerusalem, Beveriy (Northeast Philippines) 

Jose, Antonio (Northeast Philippines) 

Junius, Nathan D. (Liberia) 

Justo, Benjamin (Northeast Philippines) 

Kangara, Pedzisai (Zimbabwe) 

Karmbor, Sr., James W. (Liberia) 

Kpaan, Anna S. (Liberia) 

Kpaan, Momoh S. (Liberia) 

Laconsay, Leah (Northwest Philippines) 

Ladia, Nelson (Northern Philippines) 

Larida, Franklin M. (Northeast Philippines) 

Leano, Byron (Northeast Philippines) 

Logan, Comfort N. (Liberia) 

Lorenzana, BalligiJ. (Northeast Philippines) 

Lumanang, Honorata (Northwest Philippines) 

Lumanang, Romeo (Northwest Philippines) 

Luna, Elmer V. (Northeast Philippines) 

Machinga, Gift K. (Zimbabwe) 

Machuma, Shepherd K. (Zimbabwe) 

Madelar, Nieves (Northeast Philippines) 

Mafondokoto, Jairus (Zimbabwe) 

Maggay, Erwyn (North Central Pliilippines) 

Maggay, Nena (North Central Philippines) 



Daily Edition Vol. 5 No. 1 



29 



Malana, Glomar (Northern Philippines) 
Mangomong, Rebecca (Northwest Philippines) 
Marange, Kennedy (Zimbabwe) 
Marima, William F. (Zimbabwe) 
Martinez, Samuel (Northern Philippines) 
Masamba, Mary (Zimbabwe) 
McPherson, Douglas D. (Oklahoma) 
Miguel, Modesta (Northern Philippines) 
Miguel, Samuel (Northeast Philippines) 
Minium, Donald C. (Wyoming) 
Munjoma.John F. (Zimbabwe) 
Mutasa, Beatrice (Zimbabwe) 
Mutize, Peter (Zimbabwe) 
Mwandira, Kelvin (Zimbabwe) 
Nahimana, Mary (Burundi) 
Nelson, Jr., Julius S. (Liberia) 
Ntaboneka, Simeon (Burundi) 
Ntoriko, Hananiah (Nigeria) 
Octaviano, Lito (North Central Philippines) 
Olonan, Virgilio C. (Northeast Philippines) 
Ortiz, Carlos (Northwest Philippines) 
Pacudan, Antonio (North Central Philippines) 
Pardon, Samuel (North Central Philippines) 
Pascasio, Arnold (North Central Philippines) 
Pascasio, Hedelyn (North Central Philippines) 
Pascasio, Jovita (North Central Philippines) 
Pascasio, Marceliano (North Central Philippines) 
Pico, Rodel (Northern Philippines) 
Quidangen, Ciony (Northwest Philippines) 
Quidasol, Bienvenido M. (North Central Philippines) 
Quilang, Benjamin L. (Northern Philippines) 
Quilang, Remedies Y. (Northern Philippines) 
Quinit, Trinidad (Northwest Philippines) 
Racquel, Boyser (Northern Philippines) 
Ramos, Jose (North Central Philippines) 
Ramos, Rolando (North Central Philippines) 
Rapanut, Carlo A. (Northwest Philippines) 
Rasing, Medardo (North Central Philippines) 
Refuerzo, Homer (Northwest Philippines) 
Rinonos, Edwin (North Central Philippines) 
Roldan, Leonardo (Northwest Philippines) 
Romero, Leopoldo (Northwest Philippines) 



Roque, Luzviminda P. (Northeast Philippines) 
Ross-Bedell, Agatha (Liberia) 
Rumias, Roy (Northern Philippines) 
Sadang, Nelson (North Central Philippines) 
Sagadraca, Wilson E. (Northeast Philippines) 
Salacu, Rolando (North Central Philippines) 
Salvatierra, Lorna A. (Northern Philippines) 
Santiago, Rebecca (Northern Philippines) 
Satumo, Adriana (Northeast Philippines) 
Sebastian, Romulo R. (Northeast Philippines) 
Serquina, Sr., Pedro (Northwest Philippines) 
Siazon, Aida (Northern Philippines) 
Solunteh, James K. (Liberia) 
Soriano, Ernesto C. (Northeast Philippines) 
Taberlo, Esperlita (Northern Philippines) 
Tallayo, Jolly (Northwest Philippines) 
Tandayu, Primitivo G. (North Central Philippines) 
Tandayu, Silvestre (North Central Philippines) 
Taoaguen, Bonifacio (Northwest Philippines) 
Taoaguen, Rosemarie (Northwest Philippines) 
Tolentino, Elwyn (Northern Philippines) 
Torida, Crisotomo (Northern Philippines) 
Torio, Sr, Pedro (Northwest Philippines) 
Travino, Luis Ernesto (Mexico) 
Tubayan, Jose (Northeast Philippines) 
Tumangan, Maximo (North Central Philippines) 
Turgano, Benjamin (Northwest Philippines) 
Udasco, Chita (Northern Philippines) 
Valdez, Rodolfo (Northwest Philippines) 
Valelo, Federico (Northwest Philippines) 
Valera, Alejandrino (Northwest Philippines) 
Valera, Caridad (Northwest Philippines) 
Valera, David (Northwest Philippines) 
Velasco, Virgilio (North Central Philippines) 
Villaluz, Artemio M. (Northeast Philippines) 
Villaluz, Fe Paulina R. (Northeast Philippines) 
Villanueva, Castulo (Northeast Philippines) 
Viloria, Manuel (Northwest Philippines) 
Watty, William W. (Caribbean and the Americas) 
Zoreno, Adiel (Nigeria) 
Zvinoira, John (Zimbabwe) 



Additions and Changes to Listing 
of Voting and Reserve Delegates 



Central Texas 

Correct Name: Huber-Rohljs, Ruth 

Central Luzon 

Chair of Delegation: Jesus "Josue" M. Lacaulan 



(Pages 32-71 Advance DCA \) 

Minnesota 

Correct Name: Toschak, Patricia Martin 

Mississippi 

Correct Name: May, Joe W. 



Eastern Pennsylvania 

Correct Name: Thompson, Lenora 

Hungary Provisional 

Chair of Delegation: Csemak, Istvan 



New England 

Remove: Lee, Kum (deceased) 

Add to end of reserve list: Falvey, Frank, conference con- 
troller, 920 Pond Street, Franklin, MA 02038 



30 



April 16, 1996 



Northern New Jersey 

Remove: Olive, George E. (resigned) 
Add to end of reserve list: Elmiger, linda S., editor, 110 
Parkview Drive, Teaneck, NJ 07666 

Oklahoma 

Remove: Allen, Robert L. (resigned) 

Add to end of reserve list: McPherson, Douglas D., district su- 
perintendent, 2200 North Classen, #1320, Oklahoma City, 
OK 73106 

Southern Illmois 

Correct Name: May, Orville 



Southwest Texas 

Correct Name: Lowry, Mike 
West Virginia 

Remove: Underwood, Cecil H. (resigned) 
Add to end of reserve list: Flanagan, Janet L, education as- 
sistant, 600 Morton Avenue, Moundsville, WV 26041 

Wyoming 

Remove: Anderson, Gail 0. (resigned) 

Add to end of reserve list: Minturn, Donald C, retired con- 
ference treasurer, 12 Bromley Avenue, Binghamton, NY 
13901-2027 



Changes in Standing Legislative Committees 



Church and Society 

AAA. Junius, Nathan D. (Liberia) 

Conferences 

Add: Hamill, Raymond L. (Wyoming) 
Logan, Comfort N. (Liberia) 
Sessions, Jeff B. (Alabama-West Florida) 
Teano, Veronica (Philippines) 

Discipleship 

Add: Cox, Sr., Lamark J. (Liberia) 

Ntoriko, Hananiah (Nigeria) 

Villaluz, Artemio M. (Northeast Philippines) 

Financial Administration 

Remove: Eberhart, Diane W. (Iowa) 

Add: Caypuno, Sr., David A. (Northern Philippines) 

Dayap, Efren (Northwest Philippines) 

Jackson, Jr., W. Nippy T. (Liberia) 

Meyer, Margaret E. (Iowa) 

Nahimana, Mary (Burundi) 

General Administration/ 
Judicial Administration 

Add: Dambura, Anthony (Nigeria) 
Dassama, Sr., Moussa A. (Liberia) 
Inere, Oscar C. (North Central Philippines) 



Global Ministries 

Add: Casuco, Marcelino (Philippines) 

Nelson, Jr., Julius S. (Liberia) 

Watty, William W. (Caribbean and the Americas) 

Higher Education and Chaplaincy 

Remove: Anderson, Gail 0. (Wyoming) 
Sessions, Jeff B. (Alabama- West Florida) 
Add: Beltran, Olive G. (North Central Philippines) 
Kpaan, Momoh S. (Liberia) 

Independent Commissions 

Remove: Olive, George B. (Northern New Jersey) 
Add: Granado, Simplicio T. (Northern Philippines) 
Istakanus, Rifkatu (Nigeria) 
Spelman, Jeffrey R. 

Local Church 

Remove: Lee, Kum (New England) 
Add: Wiborg, Margaret (New England) 

Ordained and Diaconal Ministry 

Remove: Meyer, Margaret E. (Iowa) 

Add: Eberhart, Diane (Iowa) 

Kpaan, Anna S. (Liberia) 

Ntabonega, Simeon (Burundi) 

Lumanang, Romeo (Northwest Philippines) 

Roque, Luzviminda P. (Northeast Philippines) 

Zoreno, Adiel (Nigeria) 



Daily Edition Vol. 5 No. 1 



Nonimations to the Interjurisdictional 
Committee on Episcopacy 



North Central Jurisdiction 
West Ohio 

Add: Philip D. Brooks 
Caiyl Kril 

Northeastern Jurisdiction 

Northern New Jersey 

Add: Ernest S. Lyght 
Robert B. Brandt 



Western Jurisdiction 

California-Pacific 

Add: Patricia Farris 
Becky Haase 



Proposal for Three Korean-American Missionary Conferences 



The following petition was inadvertantly omitted 
from the Advance Editions. 



Petition Number: 21731-CO-NonDis-0$; National 
Association of Korean-American United Methodist 
Churches 

Executive Summary of Proposed Korean 
American Missionary Conference 

Proposed Action 

• Request the 1996 General Conference to create three 
Korean-American Missionary Conferences in the 
Northeastern, North Central, and Western Jurisdic- 
tions. 



Purpose 

• To provide opportunities for distinctive language and 
cultural ministries with Korean Americans by devel- 
oping new congregations. 

• To provide channels for full participation in the life of 
The United Methodist Church 

• To develop meaningful connectional ties 

• To develop strong lay and clergy leadership of both 
genders and all generations 



Rationale 

• One million Korean Americans in the United States 
today whose primary language and culture is still 
Korean 

• While 75% have some ties with the church, many do 
not "belong" to a church, and many churches have 
no ties to a denomination 

• As of 1994, there are 295 Korean American UMC 
churches and congregations 

• Korean American churches have unique charac- 
teristics that set them apart from other UMC 
churches 

• Cultural misunderstandings and shifting circum- 
stances have caused difficulties between UMC struc- 
tures and Korean American churches 

• Another structure for ministry needs to be explored 

General Provisions 

• Missionary conferences to be temporary structures; 
target termination date — 2016 

• Financially self-supporting 

• Be consistent with the polity and provisions of The 
Book of Discipline 



April 16, 1996 



• Existing Korean churches may remain in annual con- 
ferences or join the new missionary conferences 

• Inclusion of laity, second and transgenerational per- 
sons, and women — particularly women clergy — in all 
aspects of the missionary conference. 

Organization and Administrative Structure 

• Earliest anticipated date of the conferences — ^July 
1997 

• Will have a cabinet, conference council on finance 
and administration, council on ministries, and board 
of ordained ministry 

• Additional administrative and program agencies and 
committees to be organized 

Cooperation 

• An umbrella structure such as National Commission 
on United Methodist Korean Mission to coordinate 
and support missionary conferences and existing 
missions 

• To coordinate the work of missionary conferences 
and the UMC at large 

Proposed Korean American Missionary 
Conference 

1 . Proposed Action 

We request the 1996 General Conference to create 
Missionary Conferences in three jurisdictions as fol- 
lows: 

Northeastern Jurisdiction Korean American Mis- 
sionary Conference 

North Central Jurisdiction Korean American Mis- 
sionary Conference 

Western Jurisdiction Korean American Missionary 
Conference 



2. Rationale 

Korean Immigration and the Impact 
of Cultural Diversity on the UMC 

There are nearly one million Korean Americans in 
the United States today,* the great majority of them 
having arrived in this country during the past twenty-five 
year period. In addition to the population increase, the 
presence of a new and distinct community has become 
evident in the rapid spread and visibility of "Korea- 
towns," small businesses as well as corporations, and 
Korean language media (TV, radio, newspaper). While 
this new community promotes acculturation into the 
mainstream American culture primarily through educa- 



tion and social mobility, its primary language and culture 
is Korean. Given that the average length of residence in 
the United States for Koreans is eight years,** the 
Korean community is basically an immigrant commu- 
nity, and the community process is largely conducted in 
the Korean language. Many in the community retain 
strong ties with Korea and Korean American social 
groups. 

As Korean immigrants settled into their new homes 
in America, the Korean American Christian church be- 
came the center of their social and cultural life. About 
65% of the Koreans attend Protestant churches and 
additional 10% attend Catholic churches regularly.*** 
Though over 75% of the Korean American population 
have relationships with the church, there are many 
individuals who do not "belong" to a church. In addition, 
there are Korean American churches that do not have 
membership with a denomination. As a missionary peo- 
ple, God is sending us forth to incarnate the Risen Christ 
in this community. Persons and churches among these 
people are bearing their distinct witness to Christ and 
offering their unique services to their people and the 
wider world. As of 1994, there were 295 Korean Ameri- 
can United Methodist churches and congregations.**** 
Although these churches belong to The United Meth- 
odist Church, they have distinctive features which set 
them apart from other UMC's. They worship, fellow- 
ship, exercise their faith, and administer the church in 
their nafive language in their own unique cultural style, 
which has allowed the church to enter their community 
for most effective witness and service. 

In response to the shifting demographics of Kore- 
ans in America, annual conferences, general boards and 
agencies, and bishops selflessly extended their efforts 
to reach Korean immigrants. Praise God! Regretfully, as 
a result of cultural misunderstandings and shifting cir- 
cumstances, painfully demoralizing confiicts developed 
between the respective parties. Those offering their 
services in existing UMC structures realized that the 
complexities of the emerging and growing Korean 
American communities, and the scope of the services 
required of them far exceeded their capabilities. At the 
same time, Korean American communities, sincerely 
wishing to be cooperative and helpful, discovered that 
the demands of belonging to The United Methodist 
Church often exceeded their best intentions. It became 
apparent that another structure for ministry needed to 
be explored for Korean American churches and the 
UMC to continue in partnership. 

Creation of the Jurisdictional Korean Missions 

The 1988 General Conference authorized the crea- 
tion of jurisdictional missions to supplement annual con- 
ference efforts in establishing new Korean American 
churches OT 663, 664). Five jurisdictional missions 
have since been launched, with the participation and 
support from Korean Americans and persons of other 
ethnic heritage in annual conferences, the jurisdictional 



Daily Edition Vol. 5 No. 1 



33 



colleges of bishops, and the General Board of Global 
Ministries. 

Tlirough these missions, United Methodism has 
established one hundred new congregations between 
1988 and 1995. Twenty-nine of these have since become 
chartered churches in their annual conferences. 

Additional Needs Surface 

The UMC has learned throughout her history that 
new churches, regardless of their ethnicity, are not 
prepared at birth to participate fully in annual confer- 
ences nor in the general Church's mission. New 
churches require continual nurturing on all levels of 
program and the church. Preparing Korean American 
Methodists churches for their distinct participation in 
God's mission through The United Methodist Church 
requires training in the denomination's polity, pro- 
grams, appointment system, and outreach — including 
interpretation, apportionment. Advance Specials, and 
Volunteers in Mission. Specialized training for this com- 
munity requires unique skills to address their particular 
language and cultural needs. 

While the general boards and agencies, as well as 
the annual conferences, have provided significant nur- 
ture and training, they recognize that their efforts have 
only signaled a start and are not sufficient. 

The Jurisdictional Korean Missions also recognize 
their limitations. They were created to start new 
churches. According to The Book of Discipline and their 
by-laws, the missions are not organized to address the 
mounting need for the specialized and sustained train- 
ing required by local Korean American UMC's. Nor are 
the missions authorized to handle rapidly shifting ap- 
pointment needs as was true in the denomination's early 
development. 

Missionary Conferences Continue to Build on the 
Momentum 

77ze Book of Discipline (II 659) provides for the 
creation of missionary conferences. This structure 
would sharpen the denomination's focus on developing 
her missional opportunities found in the Korean Ameri- 
can community and churches. This structure would also 
build on the work of general boards and agencies, as 
well as annual conferences, the jurisdictional missions, 
and local congregations. 

Missionary conferences would specialize in not only 
developing new congregations among this highly diver- 
sified immigrant group, it would also nurture them to 
fully participate in the mission of the wider church. 
Furthermore, the missionary conferences shall be futur- 
istic and prophetic in focusing on ministries for the 
future generations (transgeneration, second and pro- 
ceeding) of Korean Americans. Overall, the missionary 
conferences shall prepare local Korean American 
churches for distinct contributions to United Methodist 
outreach throughout America and the world. 



Missionary conferences provide a setting to contex- 
tualize faith in Christ under the community's indigenous 
and diversified leadership so that their faith will address 
the unique dimensions of the issues common to all of 
us. These include issues related to spiritual needs, social 
problems, bridging gender and generational differ- 
ences, reaching across class and racial lines, and spread- 
ing clergy and lay leadership in God's mission. 

While those with Korean language skills will be very 
prominent in leadership, all persons, churches, confer- 
ences, boards and agencies, regardless of their ethnicity 
or language skills, can find ways to participate in this 
missional thrust of The United Methodist Church. De- 
tails of these possibilities can be explored in the pro- 
posed membership, structure, leadership, programs, 
funding, and tenure of the missionary conferences out- 
lined below. 

Our Faith and Calling 

In the Acts of the Apostles we read about the Holy 
Spirit spreading the presence of the Risen Christ 
through persons crossing geographic and cultural bar- 
riers (Acts 1:8). United Methodism came into existence 
and continues at its best moments to offer Christ to new 
constituencies by entering existing communities and 
crossing the frontiers of emerging communities. The 
circuit rider who forged into new and unknown territo- 
ries for the sake of ministry and God remains an appro- 
priate symbol of that heritage. 

We are, therefore, a people sent by the Holy Spirit 
into God's world Qohn 20:21) to make disciples (Mat- 
thew 28:19-20). They are formed into classes and con- 
gregations to become a part of the body of Christ as they 
continue the ministries begun in Christ (Romans 12:4-8; 
Ephesians 4:11-16). The time has come for United 
Methodism to build the momentum for mission with 
Korean American missionary conferences. They will 
help us all enter into a rapidly growing community which 
is lively, highly diversified, and ripe for witness to Christ 
and service in his name. Dear God, help us! Amen. 

3. Purpose 

Tlie purpose of these missionary conferences is to 
make disciples for Jesus Christ by equipping the Korean 
American United Methodist churches for ministry, pro- 
viding a connection for ministry beyond the local 
church, and empowering the Korean American commu- 
nity for mission— all to the glory of God. 

These missionary conferences will provide opportu- 
nities for distinctive language and cultural ministries 
with Korean Americans by developing new congrega- 
tions, providing channels for full participation in the life 
of The United Methodist Church, developing meaning- 
ful connectional ties, and focusing on the development 
of strong lay and clergy leadership of both genders and 
all generations. 



34 



April 16, 1996 



These missionary conferences can be an example 
of a new model designed to meet the needs of our 
changing society and the global village. This model may 
serve as a good example to what other immigrant com- 
munities in The United Methodist Church can do to 
further their ministries. The missionary conferences 
may also provide new models for the annual conferences 
of the UMC to better respond to the needs and hopes of 
our society, which is increasingly becoming pluralistic 
and multicultural. 

4. General Provisions 

A. Korean American missionary conferences will be 
created in three jurisdictions where there is a significant 
number of Korean American persons. 

For the time being, the two remaining Korean missions 
of the South Central and Southeastern jurisdictions will 
continue to function as missions until such time as when 
they may choose to seek another option. Funds used to 
support the three other missions shall be diverted to 
support the ministry and growth of these two missions. 

B. It is anticipated this shall be a temporary structure. 
The General Board of Global Ministries shall evaluate 
its effectiveness in mission and report to General Con- 
ference each quadrennium. The target termination date 
is the year 2016. 

C. All structures of the missionary conferences shall 
have as one of their main responsibiUties, the orientation 
and training of the Korean American constituency on 
United Methodist connectional system for the purpose 
of strengthening the participation of these churches in 
The United Methodist Church. 

D. These missionary conferences will enhance the in- 
terpretation of the connectional mission of The United 
Methodist Church by providing their fair share of hu- 
man and financial resources. 

E. These missionary conferences will be self-supporting 
and will model an innovative and alternative organiza- 
tional and operational style. 

F. A bishop will be assigned by the respective jurisdic- 
tional college of bishops to provide episcopal supervi- 
sion as prescribed by The Book of Discipline (II 660.1). 

G. The organization, memberships and relationship of 
the missionary conferences shall be consistent with the 
polity and provisions of The Book of Discipline as stated 
in ^<n 659, 660, 661, 662; ^ 12; and fi 21, 22, 23. 

H. Missionary conferences do not necessarily include 
all Korean speaking congregations within the annual 
conference boundaries. Existing Korean speaking con- 
gregations shall be given the opportunity to decide 
whether they will remain a part of the present annual 



conference or the Korean American missionary confer- 
ence. 

I. The missionary conference shall comply with the 
disciplinary provisions of inclusiveness as provided in 
fi 113, 439.2c, 530 and other similar references. There- 
fore, special care and emphasis will be given to include 
laity, second and transgenerational persons, and women 
in all aspects of the life and leadership of the missionary 
conferences. 

In cooperation with the General Board of Global Minis- 
tries, each missionary conference shall develop specific 
goals and action plans for inclusiveness. 

J. The missionary conferences shall organize commit- 
tees for English Language Ministry and Intercultural 
Families. These committees shall be represented on the 
conference Council on Ministries and other conference 
committees as appropriate. 

K. A Clergywomen's Committee shall be instituted on 
the Board of Ordained Ministry. 

L. The missionary conferences shall seek increasing 
opportunities for interaction with the annual confer- 
ences in their jurisdictions. 



5. Organization 

A. Organization of the missionary conference will follow 
the process of organizing an annual conference ("n 707). 

B. Membership of the missionary conference will come 
from the following three categories of churches: 

1) Mission congregations in the current Korean 



2) a. Korean American churches which transfer 
from annual conferences following the provisions of ^ 

44. 

b. Korean American clergy members who transfer 
following the provisions of ^ 427. 

3) Churches received from Korean Methodist 
Church and other Korean American churches in accord- 
ance with the provisions of *n^ 44 and 272. 

C. To provide inclusive clergy participation, affiliate 
memberships, with the rights and privileges described 
in ^ 443.4, maybe granted by the missionary conference 
to Korean American pastors appointed in geographical 
annual conferences. 

D. Election of lay membership as defined in ^ 35. 

E. The earliest anticipated date the missionary confer- 
ence could be operative is soon after July, 1997. In order 
for the body to be formed, the steps mentioned above 
will need to be taken. 



Daily Edition Vol. 5 No. 1 



35 



6. Administrative Structure 

6.1 Cabinet 

The cabinet shall be appointed according to the 
provisions ofJI 660.1. 

Consideration shall be given to the district superin- 
tendent serving in a part-time capacity and without sal- 
ary. 



In the selection of district superintendents, 1 
shall give due consideration to the inclusiveness of The 
United Methodist Church with respect to sex and age 
(^517). 

6.2 The Basic Structures 

The three basic structures shall be the conference 
Council on Finance and Administration, conference 
Council on Ministries, and Board of Ordained Ministry. 

6.3 Additional Structures 

Additional administrative and program agencies 
and committees may be organized as the missionary 
conference deems necessary, such as Board of Trus- 
tees, Board of Pensions, Board of Diaconal Ministry, 
Board of l^ity. Council of Youth Ministry, and United 
Methodist Men. United Methodist Women units in local 
congregations shall be organized, as well as a confer- 
ence United Methodist Women unit related to the 
Women's Division of the General Board of Global Min- 
istries in each Missionary Conference. 

7. Cooperation 

The General Board of Global Ministries is encour- 
aged to organize such an umbrella structure as a Na- 
tional Commission on United Methodist Korean 
Mission to connect, coordinate, and support the minis- 
try of the three missionary conferences and the two 
existing jurisdictional missions which shall participate 
as equal partners in this process. 

The commission shall also take the role of coordi- 
nating and connecting in the area of relation, mission, 
and ministry and program between the Korean mission- 
ary conference structures and The United Methodist 
Church at large. The commission shall be inclusive of 
laity, second and transgenerational persons, women, 
intercultural persons, and Korean Americans who are 
not members of the missionary conferences in member- 
ship. 

8. Plan of Action 

June 1996 

• Organization of three missionary annual confer- 
ences. 



• Adoption of a four-year plan for each conference. 

• Development of new models and structures 
June 2000 

• Evaluation of first four-year plan. 

• Evaluation and revision of initial models and struc- 
tures. 

• Adoption of second four-year plan. 

• Sharing of learnings with other immigrant constitu- 
encies, annual conferences, and the General Confer- 
ence. 

June 2004 

• Evaluation of second four-year plan. 

• Selection of successful models and training of 
churches. 

• Adoption of third four-year plan. 

• Sharing of learnings with other immigrant constitu- 
encies, annual conferences, and the General Confer- 
ence. 

June 2008 

• Evaluation of third four-year plan. 

• Training of Korean American churches according to 
successful models. 

• Design UMC structural change suggestions for an- 
nual conferences and UMC boards and agencies to 
reintegrate Korean American missionary conference 
churches in cooperation with Korean language 
churches who are not members of the missionary 
conferences. 

• Adopt fourth four-year plan. 

• Sharing of learnings with other immigrant constitu- 
encies and annual conferences. 

June 2012 

• Evaluation of fourth four-year plan. 

• Present suggestions for UMC structural changes to 
reintegrate Korean American missionary conference 
churches to annual conferences and UMC boards 
and agencies. 

• Adoption of fifth four-year plan. 

• Sharing of learnings with other immigrant constitu- 
encies and annual conferences. 



36 



April 16, 1996 



June 2016 

• Full Integration of Korean American missionary con- 
ference churches into annual conferences. 



9. Finance 

There are approximately 233 Korean UM churches 
and fellowships in the three proposed conferences. Of 
this number, approximately 163 are expected to join the 
proposed conferences initially. 



Expenditure 



Total direct expenditure $487,000 

Support for the general Church (14%) 68,180 



Grand total 



$ 555,180 



Apportionments for World Services, General Admini- 
stration, Inter-Denominational, Jurisdictional, Ministe- 
rial Education and Recruitment Fund, Black colleges, 
Africa University, and Mission Initiatives. 



Total (13.5%) 



65.745 



Bishop's salary 


-0- 


District superintendent's salary 


-0- 


(6-7 DS needed) 




District superintendent's travel 




and other related expenses 


$ 105,000 


Council director, including housing 


60,000 


Pension, worker 


15,000 


Travel expenses 


5,000 


Office expenses 


10,000 


Full-time office administrator 


30,000 


Shared rental 


6,000 


Other 


3,000 


Subtotal 


$ 234,000 


Church Development Fund 


175,000 


($35,000 per church; salary, housing 


, etc.; 5 churches) 


Program (UMW/UMM/UMYF) 


10,000 


Lay leader's training 


5,000 


Annual conference expenses 


3,000 


Equitable salary fund 


50,000 


Miscellaneous fund 


10,000 


Subtotal 


$ 253,000 



1 1 . Insurance and Pension 



The clergy support will be provided according to the 
provisions of ^"n 717-725 and ^ 660Ad. 



*The 1990 U.S. Census counted 798,843 Koreans in 
the United States as of April 1, 1990. The number of 
Korean immigrants between 1990 and 1995 is estimated 
at about 150,000. If we add to these the natural increases 
(births minus deaths) during the five year period, the 
present number can be safely put at between 950,000 
and 1 million. 

**Eui-Young Yu, "A Need for a Korean Language 
Conference," unpublished document prepared for the 
California-Nevada Annual Conference, Nov. 4, 1993. 

***Eui-Young Yu, Korean Community Profile, p. 26. 

****Office of Asian American Ministries, National 
Division, 1994. 



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April 16, 1996 



Petitions to the 1996 General Conference 



The following is a list of 3,070 petitions that the 
secretary of the General Conference has forwarded to 
the Committee on Reference for its review and referral 
to appropriate legislative committees. Abbreviations 
and the petition code may be found on pages 1207-1209 
of Advance Edition II. 

This list is sorted in alphabetical order by source. 
Petitions from individuals are sorted by last name; peti- 
tions from local church groups are sorted by the name 
of the group; and petitions from annual conferences are 
sorted by the annual conference abbreviations. Petitions 
from multiple sources are sorted by the first source 
listed on the petition. 

I Adm. Board, 1 Bible Study & 53 Individuals, Rockland UMC, Belpre, 

OH 22837-MN-402.2-D Ordinationand Appointment of Homosexual Per- 
sons 
10 Adm. Council/Boards and 12 Individuals, Leighton and other UM 

Chuches, Caledonia, MI 22213-DI-NonDis-O Doctrinal Integrity 
10 Administrative Boards & 12 Individuals, Leighton and Other UM 

Churches, Caledonia, MI 21544-MN-2623.1-D Regarding Chargeable 

Offenses 
10 Administrative Boards and 8 Individuals, Leighton and Other UM 

Churches, Caledonia, MI 22243-FA-911.5-D Apportionment Policy 
10 Members, Louisa UMC, Louisa, KY 21007-GJ-814.3-D Mandatory 

Retirement 
10 members, Louisa UMC, Louisa, KY 21025-MN-1024.1-2 Mandatory 

Retirement 

I I Administrative Bosirds + 5 Individuals, St. Paul and Leighton UMC, 
MountvUle and Caledonia, PA and MI 22067-MN431.10-D Qualifica- 
tions of Ordination 

12 Members, Wallingford UMC, Seattle, WA 22467-CS-NonDis-O Elec- 
tion Campaign Reform in the United States of America 

14 Administrative Boards + 7 Individuals, Leighton UMC, Caledonia, 
MI 21533-MN-733,2-D Dutiesof the Board of Ordained Ministry 

19 Administrative Boards/Groups & 31 Individuals. Leighton and Other UM 
Churches, Caledonia, MI, 22874-CS-71-D Human Sexuality 

19 Individuals, United Methodist Church, Texarkana 2md Hope, AR 
22209-DI-NonDis-O Reaffirm The Doctrinal Standards of the United Meth- 
odist Church 

27 Church Boards and Groups +17 Individuals, Christian Endeavor & 
Other UM Churches, Newark, OH 22240-FA-906.12-D Regarding 
Funding Homosexual Advocacy 

29 Church Members, Pacific Beach UMC, San Diego, CA 22299-CS-71- 
D Marriage 

30 Church Members, Pacific Beach UMC, San Diego, CA 22297-CS-71- 
D Families Take Many Forms 

30 Church Members, Pacific Beach UMC, San Diego, CA 2231(K;S-71- 

D Human and Civil Rights 
30 Members, Pacific Beach UMC, San Diego, CA 22238-FA-906.12-D 

Financial Non Discrimination 
33 Members, Pacific Beach UMC, San Diego, CA 22347-CS-NonDis-OS 

Human Sexuality Curricula Task Force 
35 Members, Pacific Beach UMC, San Diego, CA 22044-MN402.2-D 

Standards for Ordained Ministry 
4 Church Groups and 7 Individuals, Church of the Redeemer and Other 

UM Churches, Cleveland Heights, OH 21034-FA-906.12-D Human 

Sexuality 
6 Adm. Bds./Groups & 1 2 Individuals, Hope, AR & Rincon, GA 22431 

IC-NonDis-O Churches in Covenant Communion Proposal 

6 Conference Boards of Diaconal Ministry + 3 Ind. 22040-MN-313.2-D 

Relationship of a Retired Diaconal Minister to Charge Conference 

7 Adm. Boards/Councils + 3 individuals, leighton and other UM 

Churches, Caledonia, MI 22173CO-611 2-D Regarding the Book of 
Resolutions 
7 Administrative Board/Councils, Leighton and other UM Churches, 
Caledonia, MI 22273-HE-1519-D Regarding Institutional Affiliation 



7 Conference Boards of Diaconal Ministry+3 Indiv. 22440-LC-247.2-D 

The Relationship of a Retired Diaconal Minister to a Charge Conference 

8 Administrative Boards & 3 individuals, Leighton and other UM 

Churches, Caledonia, MI 22271HE-1517.2-D Membership in the Uni- 
versity Senate 

8 Administrative Boeu-ds +10 Individueils, Leighton and Other UM 
Churches, Caledonia, MI 22237-FA-906.1-D Regarding General 
Church Funding 

8 Administrative Boards + 2 Individuals, Leighton and other UM 
Churches, Caledonia, MI 22272-HE-1518-D Regarding University Sen- 



8 Administrative Boards + 3 Individuals, Leighton and Other UM 

Churches, Caledonia, MI 22244-FA-921-D The Ministerial Education 
Fund 
85 Members, Chapel HiU UMC, Sodus, MI 22687MN-402.2-D Relation 
of Ordained Ministers to the Ministiy of All Christians 

9 Administrative Boards + 10 Individuals, Leighton and Other UM 

Churches, Caledonia, MI 22231-FA-712.1D Regarding Apportion- 

Abiade, Zawdie Dr., WMI 20123-CS-NonDis-O Study on homosexuality 

Abiade, Zawdie K. Dr., WMI 20034-MN-NonDisO Pastoral duties in cross 
cultural appointments 

Abiade, Zawdie K. Dr., WMI 22809-IC-NonDis-O Conference Commis- 
sion on Religion and Race 

Abiade, Zawdie K. Dr., WMI 22861-MN-NonDis-O Relationship of the 
Cabinet, Board of Ordained Ministry and G.C.O.RR 

Abiade, Zawdie K., Burton Heights UMC, Grand Rapids, MI 21012-IC- 
740,3-D Conference Commission on Religion and Race 

Acosta, William H. + Casey, Robert T., VIR 22680-LC-270.2-D The Elec- 
tion of Committee Members and Chairpersons 

Acosta, William H. + Casey, Robert T., VIR 22681-LC-270.4-D The Elec- 
tion of Committee Members and Chairpersons 

Acosta, William H. + Casey, Robert T., VIR 22696-MN-513-D Statute of 
Limitations 

Acosta. William H. + Casey, Robert T., VIR 22677-U;-250.8-D The Elec- 
tion of Committee Members and Chairpersons 

Acosta, William H and Casey, Robert T., VIR, 22893-GJ-NonDis-O Use 
Cost of Relocating the GBGM as a Missional Priority Fund 

Adm.C, & Rosborough, D. & Cummings, Ben Mr.& Mrs., Morris 
Chapel U.M.C, NUes & Hope, Ark., MI 20808-MN-402.2-D The Or- 
dained Ministry 

Administi-ativ CouncU, St Matthias UMC, Frederichburg, VA 22140-LC- 
270.2-D Annual Evaluation of the Pastor 

Administrative Board & Council on Ministries, First UMC, St Joseph, 
MI 22832-MN402.2-D Ordination and Apppointment of Homosexual 
Persons 

Administrative Board + 3 Individuals, Drummond Chapel UMC, Mor- 
gantown, WV 22627-CO-NonDis-O Establishment of Parish Health 
Nurse Program 

Administrative Board and Members + Jenkins, Wm. E., First UMC, 
Wharton, TX 22210-DI-NonDis-O Doctiinal hitegrity 

Administrative Board and Members + Jenkins, Wm. E., First UMC, 
Wharton, TX 22211-DI-NonDis-O Doctiinal Integrity in Denominational 
Leaders 

Administrative Board and Members, Church of The Cross, Wooster, OH 
22407-DI-NonDis-O A Confessional Statement of the Confessing Move- 
ment widiin the United Methodist Church 

Administrative Board and PPR Committee, Evangel and Tolstoy UMC, 
Bowdle, SD 22691-MN-4 18-D Discontinuance from Probationary Mem- 
bership 

Administrative Board, Adel UMC, Adel, GA 22638-FA-NonDis-O Appor- 
tionments 

Administrative Board, Annona + Laton UM Churches, Laton, CA 22308- 
CS-71-D Human SexuaUty 

Administi-ative Board, Asbury UMC, Odessa, TX 22091-MN-53O.3-D 
Voluntary Consent of Conference Members to Transfer 

Administrative Board, Bartlett Chapel UMC, Danville, IN 20864-CS-71-D 
Human Sexuality 

Administi-ative Board, Bethany UMC, San Francisco, CA 22298-CS-71-D 
Marriage 

Administi-ative Board, Bethany UMC, San Francisco, CA 22309-CS-71-D 
Human Sexuality 



38 



Daily Edition Vol. 5 No. 1 



Administrative Board. Bethany UMC, San Francisco, CA 22328<;S^76-D 

Our Social Creed 
Administrative Board, Bowman UMC, Bowman, DK 20984-CS-NonDis-O 

Human Sexuality 
Administrative Board, Bowman UMC, Bowman, ND 20992-DINonDis-O 
The Doctrinal Standards of the United Methodist Church and Homosexual- 
ity 
Administrative Board, Bowroan UMC, Bowman, ND 20993^DI-NonDisO 

Doctrinal Standards 
Administrative Board, Bowman UMC, Bowman, ND 20994-DINonDis-O 

Concerning Eternal Truth 
Administrative Board, Bowman UMC, Bowman, ND 20995-DI-NonDis-O 

The Bible as the Rule of Faith and Practice 
Administrative Board, Bowman UMC, Bowman, ND 20996-DI-NonDisO 

Doctrinal Standards 
Administrative Board, Bowman UMC, Bowman, TX 20991-DI-NonDisO 

Doctrinal Standards 
Administrative Board, First UMC, Gadsen, AL 20094-LC-230.1D Care 

of Members 
Administrative Board, First UMC, Kerrait, TX 21008-GJ-814.6-D General 

Council on Ministry 
Administrative Board, First UMC, Manchester, TN 22215-DI-NonDis-O 

Regarding Worship 
Administrative Board, First UMC, Manchester, TN 2234frCS-NonDis-0 

Reaffirm the Discipline's Position on Homosexuality 
Administrative Board, First UMC, NiceviUe, FL 22517-GJNonDis-O Lay 
Persons employed by Boards, Agencies, and Committees of the United 
Methodist Church 
Administrative Board, First UMC, NiceviUe, FL 22562-FA-NonDis-O Re- 
structure of the Language and Spirit of the World Service and Conference 
Benevolence 
Administrative Board, First UMC, NiceviUe, FL 22835-MN402.2-D Or- 
dination and Appointment of Homosexual Persons 
Administrative Board, First UMC, Port Lavaca, TX 20899-U:-NonDis-O 

Voting Rights of Church Professionals 
Administrative Board & Goldman, June of IWA, First UMC, NiceviUe, 
FL, 22909-GJ-NonDis-O Relocation of the General Board of General Board 
of Global Ministries 
Administrative Board, Grace UMC, Newport, KY 22836-MN-402.2-D 

Ordination and Appointment of Homosexual Persons 
Administrative Board, Great Falls UMC, Great Falls, VA 22849-MN-531- 

D Consultation and Appointment Making 
Adrainisti-ative Board, Great Falls UMC, Great Falls, VA 22872-MN-533- 

D Process of Appointment-Making 
Administi-ative Board, Isle of Faith UMC, Jacksonville, FL, 23034-MN- 

534-D Frequency in Appointment Making 
Administrative Board, Isle of Faith UMC, Jacksonville, FL, 23033-MN- 

533-D Process of Appointment Making 
Administi-ative Board, Keith Memorial UMC, Malvern, AR 20997-DI- 

NonDis-0 Sophia 
Administi-ative Board, Kenova UMC, Kenova, WVA 22815-LC-261-D Co- 
ordinator of Prayer Ministries 
Administi-ative Board, Kenova UMC, Kenova, WVA 22816-LC-262-D Co- 
ordinator of Prayer Ministries 
Administi-ative Board, Lakeland and Nashville UMC, Nashville, Ga, 
Lakeland, GA 22631-DI-NonDis-O Resolution to Confess Jesus as Lord 
of All 
Administi-ative Board, Lakeland UMC, Lakeland, GA 22632-DI-NonDis 

Resolution to Restore Religious Freedom 
Administrative Board, I^ighton UMC ■► Kriesch, Richard L., Rev., Cale- 
donia & Lexington, MI 22315-CS-71-D Regarding Abortion 
Administi-ative Board, Mandarin UMC, Jacksonville, FL 22751-Dl-Non- 

Dis-0 Regarding Future Editions of the Book of Hymns 
Administrative Board, Meadowview UMC, Meadowview, VA 22745-Dl- 

1225-D Curriculum Resources 
Administi-ative Board, Shoregate UMC, Willowick, OH 22116-LC-248.13- 

D Basic Salary Oiition Plan 
Administe^ative Board, Shoregate UMC, Willowwick, OH 22232-FA-712.5- 

D Regarding Apportionments 
Administi-ative Board, St. Paul UMC, Gulf Breeze, FL 2258(K;S-NonDis- 

Homosexuality 
Administi-ative Board, St. Paul UMC, Gulf Breeze, FL 22587-CS-NonDis 

Sanctity of Life and Opposition to Abortion 
Administrative Board, St. Paul's +13 Other Church Bds. + 13 Individu- 
als, Mountville, PA 22043-MN-402.2-D Ordination and Appointment of 
Homosexual Persons 



Administrative Board, St. Paul's * Leighton UM Churches, Mountville, 
PA 22307-CS-71-D Regarding Human SexuaUty 

Administrative Board, St. Paul's * Leighton UM Churches, Mountville, 
PA. & Caledonia, MI 22312-CS-71-D Regarding Rights of Homosexual 
Persons 

Adminish^ative Board, SL Paul's UMC ♦ Ixighton UMC + CIL, Moun- 
tville, PA., Caledonia, MI 22302-CS71-D Regarding Human Sexuality 

Administi-ative Board, St. Paul's UMC on Behalf of Garrett Cty., MD. 
UMC, Oakland, MD 22736-CO-NonDis-O Name Change for West Vir- 
ginia Annual Conference 

Administrative Board, Trinity UMC, Annapolis, MD 20883-FA-906-D 
Fiscal Responsibilities 

Administi-ative Board, Trinity UMC, Richmond, VA 22635-FANonDis-O 
Regarding Funding of New Study Committees 

Administi-ative Board, Trinity UMC, Richmond, VA 22636-FA-NonDis-O 
Requesting the Church to Adopt a Balanced Budget for 1997-2000 Quadren- 



Board, Trinity UMC, Richmond, VA 22689-MN-402.2-D 
Regarding the Redefinition of "Self-Avowed Practicing Homosexual" 

Administi-ative Board, Trinity UMC, Richmond, VA 22702MN-NonDis-O 
Regarding the Ordained Ministry Study 

Administiative Board, UMC, White, SD 20093- LC-230. ID Care of Mem- 
bers 

Administi-ative Board, UMC, White, SD 20095-LC-230.2-D Care of mem 
bers 

Administrative Board, UMC, White, SD 20096-LC-230.3-D Care of Mem 
bers 

Administi-ative Board, UMC, White, SD 20097-LC-230.4-D Care of Mem 

Administi-ative Board, Viola UMC, Viola, IL 22868-DI-NonDis-O Con 

cerning the Services of the Baptismal Covenant 
Administrative Board, Wauhatchie UMC, Chattanooga, TN 22513-DI- 

NonDis-O Church's Stand on Baptism of Infants 
Administrative Board, Wauhatchie UMC, Chattanooga, TN, 22908-MN 

NonDis-0 Practice of Homosexuality While a Minister or Employee of the 

United Methodist Church 
Administrative Board, Wauhatchie UMC, Chattanooga, TN, 22888<;S- 

NonDis-0 Church's Stand on Homosexuabty 
Administi-ative Board, Westpark ITMC, Yakima, WA 22840-MN-424.7-D 

The Ordained Ministry 
Administi-ative Board, Westpark UMC, Yakima, WA 22842-MN-432.6-D 

The Ordained Ministry 
Administrative Board/Council, St. Paul's ■► Leighton UMC, Mountville, 

PA & Caledonia, MI 22303-CS-71-D Regarding Human Sexuality 
Administrative Board/Council, Trinity, First, and Lake Villa UM 

Churches, Steriing, Forreston & Lake Villa, IL 2230aCS-71-D The 

Marriage Covenant 
Administrative Boards/Councils, Leighton UMC + 5 others, Caledonia, 

MI 22345-CS-NonDis-O Regarding Parental Family Responsibility 
Administi-ative Council, Cokesbuiy UMC, Marcus Hook, PA, 22910-GJ- 

NonDis-0 Opposition to Moving the General Board of Global Ministries 

from New York to Reston, Va. 
Administi-ative Council and Task Force, Faith UMC, Buchanan, MI 

21027-MN402.2-D Ordination of Homosexuals 
Administrative Council and Task Force, Faith United Methodist Church, 

Buchanan, MI 20054-CS-71-D Homosexuality Incompatible WiUi Chris- 
tian Teaching 
Administi-ative Council, Centenary UMC, Shelbyville, KY 21026-MN- 

402.2-D Human Sexuality 
Administi-ative Council, Christian Endeavor UMC, Newark, OH 22458- 

CS-NonDis-O Homosexual Advocacy 
Administi-ative Council, First UMC, Kermit, TX 20834-CO-660. ID The 

Office of District Superintendent 
Administi-ative Council, First UMC, Kermit, TX 20835-FA-712-D Appor- 
tionments of Workl Service and Conference Benevolence 
Administi-ative Council, First UMC, Kermit, TX 20837-FA-908-D Appor- 
tionments of World Service and Conference Benevolence 
Administi-ative Council, First UMC, Kermit, TX 20838-FA-912-D The 

World Service Fund 
Administi-ative Council, First UMC, Kermit, TX 20839-FA-912.1-D The 

Apportionments of World Service And Conference Benevolence 
Administi-ative Council, First UMC, Kermit, TX 20840-FA-912.2-D The 

A|)portionments of World Service and Conference Benevolence 
Administi-ative Council, First UMC, Kermit, TX 20841-GJ-803.5-D Pro 

gram Related General Agencies 



April 16, 1996 



39 



! Council, First UMC, Kermit, TX 20842LC-257.4-D Re- 
sponsibilities of the Administrative Board/ Council 

Administrative Council, First UMC, Kermit, TX 20844MN-501-D The 
Office of District Superintendent 

Administrative Council, First UMC, Kermit, TX 20845-MN-503-D Office 
of District Superintendent 

Administrative CouncU, First UMC, Kermit, TX 20846-MN-504D Office 
of Superintendent 

Administrative CouncU, First UMC, Kermit, TX 20847-MN-518-D Umi- 
tations on Years of Service 

Administrative CouncU, First UMC, Kermit, TX 20987-CO-6n.2-D Gen- 
eral Council on Ministry 

Administrative Council, First UMC, Kermit, TX 20988<;O-706.2D Gen- 
eral Council on Mil 



Administrative Council, First UMC, Kermit, TX 20998-FA-711.3-D A\> 
portionments of World Service and Conference Benevolences 

Administrative Council, First UMC, Kermit, TX 20999-FA-711.4-D Ap- 
portionments of World Service and Conference Benevolences 

Administrative CouncU, First UMC, Kermit, TX 2 100(>FA-906. 1 ID Gen- 
eral Council on Ministry 

Administrative CouncU, First UMC, Kermit, TX 21001-FA-907.2-D Gen- 
eral Council on Ministry 

Administrative CouncU, First UMC, Kermit, TX 21002-FA-9U.2-D Gen- 
eral Council on Ministry 

Administrative CouncU, First UMC, Kermit, TX 21004-GJ-802.3-D Gen- 
eral Council on Ministry 

Administrative CouncU, First UMC, Kermit, TX 21005-GJ-803.1-D Gen- 
eral Council on Ministry 

Administrative CouncU, First UMC, Kermit, TX 21006-GJ-S13-D General 
Council on Ministries 



Administrative CouncU, First UMC, Kermit, TX 21029-LC-248.14-D Pow- 
ers and Duties of tlie Charge Conference 
Administrative Council, First UMC, Ormond Beach, FL 22358-FA-Non- 

Dis-OS Financial Policies and Practices of the United Methodist Church 
Administrative CouncU, First UMC, Ormond Beach, FL 22359-FA-Non- 

Dis-0 Connectional Tithing 
Administrative CouncU, First UMC, Ormond Beach, FL 22360-FA-Non 

Dis-0 Organiijational Accountability for Funds Apportioned 
Administrative CouncU, First UMC, Ormond Beach, FL 22362-GJ-Non- 

Dis-OS Programs of the United Methodist Church 
Administrative Council, First United Methodist Church, Johnston City, 

XL 20083-IC-NonDis-O Consultation on Church Union (COCU) Proposal 
Administi-ative CouncU, Grace UMC, Newport, KY 22493-CS-71-D Ceri- 

monies that Celebrate Homosexual Unions 
Administrative CouncU, Grace UMC, Newport, KY 22494-CS-71-D Hu- 
man Sexuality 
Administrative CouncU, Grace UMC, Newport, KY 22497-CS-71-D Sex- 
ual Relations 
Administi-ative Council, Grace UMC, Newport, KY 22524-IC-2402.1D 

The Consultation on Church Union 
Administi-ative CouncU, Grace UMC, Newport, KY 22640-FA-NonDis-O 

Monetary Assistance to the Promotion or Acceptance of Homosexuality 
Administrative CouncU, Grant Park-AIdersgatc UMC, Atlanta, GA 

22045-MN-402.2-D The Ordained Ministry 
Administrative CouncU, Grant Park-Aldersgate UMC, Atlanta, GA 

22047-MN-404.4-D The Ordained Ministry 
Administrative CouncU, Grant Park-Aldersgate UMC, Atianta, GA 

22128-LC-262. 1 1-D Chain)erson of Worship 
Administrative Council, Grant Park-Aldersgate UMC, Atianta, GA 

22301-CS-71-D Covenant Relationships 
Administrative Council, Grant Park-Aldersgate UMC, Atianta, GA 

22304-CS-71-D The Nurturing Community 
Administrative Council, Grant Park-Aldersgate UMC, Atianta, GA 

22305^S-71-D The Nurturing Community 
Administi-ative Council, Jacumba UMC, Jacumba, CA 22363-IC-190(>D 

Responsibility of the General Commission on Communication 
Administrative CouncU, Mt. Hermon UMC, Salem, MO 22227-DI-282.2- 

D Sacraments to be Given by Appointed Lay Preachers 
Administrative CouncU, Oakwood UMC, Lubbock, TX 22033-IC-NonDis 

O Suggested Statement to precede each Press Release, Statement or Study 

Position Paper 



Administrative Council, Poca UMC, Poca, WV 22208-Dl-NonDis-O Re- 
affirm the Holy Scriptures as the EVimary and Central Authority 

Administrative Council, Rincon UMC, Rincon, GA 22860-MN-NonDisO 
Adhere lo the Book of Discipline 

Administrative CouncU, Rincon UMC, Rincon, GA 22866-DI-NonDls-O 
"By Water and the Spirit" Document 

Administrative Council, Saint James UMC, Tucson, AZ 2233&CS71-D 
Regarding Abortion 

Administrative Council, Saint James UMC, Tucson, AZ 22623-CO-6I 1.2- 
D Regarding the Book of Resolution 

Administrative CouncU, St. Marks UMC, Findlay, OH 22254-FA-NonDis- 
Enabling of Ministries of Compassion and/or Proclamation 

Administrative CouncU, St Marks UMC, Findlay, OH 22648-CO-NonDl9- 
Random Assignment of Delegates to Committees 

Administrative Council, University Park UMC, Portland, OR 22760-FA- 
NonDis-0 Expand Options of the Health Flex Insurance Program 

Administi-ative Council, Westpark UMC & First UMC, SL Joseph, MI, 
Yakima, WA 22824-MN-404.4-D Die Certified Candidate 

Administi-ative CouncU, Westpark UMC, Yakima, WA 22825^MN414.8-D 
Qualifications for Election to I'robationary Membership 

Administrative CouncU, Westpark UMC, Yakima, WA 22828-MN-407.1-D 
The Ordained Ministry 

Administi-ative Council. Zion UMC, NorUna, NC 22250-FA-NonDisO 
Concerning the Black College Line Item in the Annual Apportionment 

Administi-ative Ministiy, Westpark UMC, Yakima, WA 22826-MN-105.4- 
D The Ordained Ministry 

Administrative/Council Board, Leighton UMC, Caledonia, Ml 22344- 
CS-R125-IJ Rcgiu-ding "Res|)onsible Parenthood" 

Administrattive Council, Grace UMC, Newport, KY 22614-CS-71-D Fi- 
nancial Responsibilities 

Africa University Committee & Bd. of Higher Ed., North Indiana Annual 
Conference, Indianapolis, IN 21515-FA-NonDis-0$ The Afiica Uni- 
versity Fund 

Agnew, Theodore L., 20 Members Huntington NY UMC, First UMC, 
StUlwater, OK 22022-IC-NonDis-O Adopt "Churches in Covenant Com- 



Agnew, Theodore L., First UMC, Stillwater, OK 21541-GJ-lOOl-D The 
General Council on Ministries 

Agnew, Theodore L., First UMC, StiUwater, OK 2202&IC-NonDis-O 
Continue Membership of the United Methodist Church in the World Meth- 
odist Council 

Agnew, Theodore L., First UMC, StiUwater, OK 22027-IC-NonDis-O 
Continue Membership of the United Methodist Church in the Consultation 
on Church Union 

Agnew, Theodore L,, First UMC, StiUwater, OK 22028-IC-NonDls-O 
Continue Membership of the UMC in the National Council of the Churches 
of Christ m the USA 

Agnew, Theodore L., First UMC, Stillwater, OK 22029-IC-NonDis-O 
Continuation of the Membership of the United Methodist Church in the 
World Council of Churches 

Agnew, Theodore L., First UMC, Stillwater, OK 22046-MN-104-D Can- 
didacy for Ordained Ministry 

Agnew, Theodore L, First UMC, Stillwater, OK 22054-MN-412-D Defi- 
nition of "Clergy Session" 

Agnew,TheodoreL.,FirstUMC, StiUwater, OK 22078-MN-509.I-D Ter- 
mination of Office 

Agnew, Theodore L., First irMC, Stillwater, OK 22089-MN-530.1-D Re- 
sponsibility 

Agnew, Theodore L., First UMC, Stillwater, OK 22179^CO-705-D Defini- 
tion of "Clergy Session" 

Agnew, Theodore L., Native American International, Caucus of The 
UMC, Stilhvater, OK 22024-IC-NonDis-O Supimrt Continuation of The 
General Commission on Refigion and Race 

Agnew, Theodore L., Native American International, Caucus of The 
UMC, Stilhvater, OK 22025-IC-NonDis-O Sup|)ort Continuation of The 
General Commission on The Status and Role of Women 

AKM 20743-MN-733.1-D Conference Board of Ordained Ministry 

Aldcrsgate Covenant Steering Committee, Aldcrsgatc UMC, Denton, TX 
22723<;S-1101-D General Board of Church & Society 

Aldersgate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 22724-CS-l 102-D 
Puri)ose of the General Board of Church and Society 

Aldersgate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 22725-CS 1103-D 
Objectives of the General Board of Church and Society 



40 



Daily Edition Vol. 5 No. 1 



Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 22726-CS-l 104-D 

Responsibilities of Uie General Board of Church and Society 
Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 22727-CS-l 105-D 

Incorporation of the General Boanl of Church and Society 
Alderegate Covenant Steering Conunittee, Denton, TX 22742-DI-1201-D 

Purpose of the General Board of Discipleship 
Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 22744-DH203-D 

Incorporation of the General Board of Discipleship 
Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 22753-FA-902-D 

General Council on Finance and Administration 
Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 22754-FA-903-D 

Incorporation of the General Council on Finance and Administration 
Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 22755-FA-906. ID 

Fiscal Responsibilities 
Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 22757-FA1701-D 

Publishing Interests 
Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 22758-FA- 1702-D 

Organization of the General Board of Publication 
Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 22765-GJ-801-D 

Agencies and General Agencies 
Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 22766-GJ-802-D 

Amenability and Program Accountability 
Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 22767-GJ-803-D 

Definitions, Structures, and Titles 
Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 22768-GJ-803.3-D 

Other General Agencies 
Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 22769-GJ-805.2-D 

General Program Board Membership 
Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 22770-GJ-826-D 

Meetings of General Boards and Agencies 
Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 22771GJ-827-D 

General Administrative Council 
Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 22772-GJ-lOOl-D 

General Council on Ministries 
Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 22773-GJ10O2 D 

General Council on Ministries 
Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 22774-GJ-1003-D 

General Council on Ministries 
Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 22776-GJ-1005-D 

General Council on Ministries 
Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 22777-GJ-1006-D 

General Council on Ministries 
Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 22778-GJ-1007D 

Organization of the General Council on Ministries 
Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 22782-HE-1501-D 

General Board of Higher Education and Ministry 
Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 22783HE-1504-D 

Purpose of die General Board of Higher Education and Ministry 
Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 22784-HE-1505-D 

Objectives of the General Board of Higher Education and Ministry 
Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 22785-HE-1513-D 

General Responsibilities 
Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 22786-HE-1514D 

Responsibilities to General and Annnual Conferences 
Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 22787-HE-1516-D 

Financing Higher Education 
Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 2279OIC-1801-D 

General Commission on Archives and History 
Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 22791-IC1802-D 

Incorporation of the General Commission on Archives and History 
Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 22792-IC-1803-D 

Purpose of the General Commission on Archives and History 
Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 22793-IC-1804-D 

Membership of the General Commission 
Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 22794-1C-1805-D 

Meetings of the General Commission 
Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 22795-IC-1806-D 

Officers of die General Commission 
Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 22796-IC-1807D 

Staff of the General Commission on Archives and History 
Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 22797-1C-1808-D 

Executive Committee 
Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 22798-1C-1809-D 
Finances of the General Commission on Archives And History 



Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 22799IC1810-D 

Historical Society 
Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 2280O-IC-1811-D 

Archival Definitions 
Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 22802IC-2001-D 

General Commission on Christian Unity and Interreligious Concerns 
Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 22803-IC-2002-D 

Purpose 
Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 22804-IC-2101-D 

Name 



Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Firet UMC, Denton, TX 

22870-HE-1515-D Responsibilities to Institutions 

Alderegate Covenant Steering, Denton, TX 22775-GJ1004-D General 
Council on Ministries 

Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 22743^DI-1202-D 
Responsibilities of the General Board of Discipleship 

Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 22779-GM-1401-D 
General Board of Global Ministiies 

Alderegate Covenant Steering Committee, Denton, TX 23019-1C-1812-D 
Historical Sites. Historical Shrines and Historical Landmarks 

Alhvard, GafyA.,RiverviewUMC,Riverview, MI 22729<;S-NonDisO A 
Religious Liberty Amendment 

Alter, Jean Ann, Northern Light UMC, Juneau, AK 22175-CO-702-D 
Voting Rights of Pastors 

Annebeng, Allen, Carroll UMC, Carroll, L\ 20977-CS-71-D Abortion: 
Right of die Mother 

Annual Charge Conference, Franklin UMC, FrankUn, MA 22733-CO-35- 
C Delegates to General and Jurisdictional Conferences 

Annual Charge Conference, Franklin UMC, FrankUn, MA 22756-FA-909- 
D Responsibilities of the Treasurer of General Council on Finance and 
Administi-ation 

Association for Physically Challenged Ministere 22056-MN-414.8-D 
Qualification for Election to Probationary Membership 

Association for Physically Challenged Ministere 22064-MN-424-D The 
Practice of Ministry 

Association for Physically Challenged Ministere 22082-MN-517-D Selec- 
tion and Assignment of Superintendents 

Association for Physically Challenged Ministers 22088-MN-53aD Ap- 
pointment-Making 

Association for Physically Challenged Ministere 22094-MN-733.2-D Du- 
ties of die Conference Board of Ordained Ministry 

Association for Physically Challenged Ministere 22095-MN-734.1-D 
Membership of Annual Conference Board of Diaconal Ministry 

Association for Physically Challenged Ministers 22098^MN-1527.2-D Ar- 
eas of Concern for the Division of Ordained Ministry 

Association for Physically Challenged Ministere 2210aMN-1529.7-D 
Responsibilities of the Division of Ordained Ministiy 

Association for Physically Challenged Ministere 22105-LC-113-D Called 
to Inclusiveness 

Association for Physically Challenged Ministere 22108-LC-219-D Admis- 
sion into die Church 

Association for PhysicaUy Challenged Ministere 22113-LC-248.6-D Pow- 
ers and Duties of die Church Conference 

Association for Physically Challenged Ministere 22135-LC-270.1-D Rep- 
resentation on the Conference Committee on Nominations and Personnel 
Association for Physically Challenged Ministere 22144-LC-2533.6-D 

Board and Trustees Powers and Limitations 
Association for Physically Challenged Ministere 22152-LC-R189-U Bar- 
rier Free ConstiTiction for Handicapped 
Association for Physically Challenged Ministere 22197-CO-NonDis-O 

General Language Change 
Association for Physically Challenged Ministere 22269-HE-1505.3-D Ob- 
jectives of the General Board of Higher Education and Ministry 
Association for PhysicaUy ChaUenged Ministere 22270-HE-1505.26-D 

Responsibilities of die General Board of Higher Education and Ministry 
Association for Physically Challenged Ministere 2229&CS-71-D The 

Nurturing Community 
Atkins, Hardin U, III, NMX 22072-MN-437-D Interim AppoinUnents and 

Interim Pastors 
Atkins, Hardin L., Ill, NMX 22136-LC-270.2-D Accountability of Non-Ap- 
pointed Local Church Staff to Appointed Pastor-in-Charge and Committees 
Atkins, Hardin L.,III + Barrett, R. Dulaney, NMX 22093-MN-533.2-D 
Age of Clergy and Appointinent Making Process 



April 16, 1996 



Baker, Mr. & Mrs. W. G., 1st. United Methodist Church, Crystal Lake, 

IL 20795-GJ-NonDis-O Granting of Advance Special status to Appalachia 
Service Project, Inc 

Baldwin, Jo, Ninth Street UMC, Covington, KY 22401MN-NonDis-O 
Regarding Language for Adoption of the "New Circuit Rider" Concept 

Bales, H., Barnes, R., White C, Johnson T., University City UMC, 
Charlotte, NC 22103-MN-454.1-D Options for Directed CounseUng or 
Therapy in Program of Remedial Action 

Bales, Harold, Johnson, Tom, Porter, Mark, WNC 22700-MNNonDis-O 
Restoration of Pastoral Leadership 

Bardsley, John W., HOL 22422-MN-517-D Selection, Assignment, and 
Term of District Superintendent 

Bardsley, John W., HOL 22862-MN-NonDis-O Appointments of Clergy 
Members 

Barling, Aaron F.,LRK 2215(>LC-2544.8-D Approval of the Church Confer- 
ence of the Building Committee's Plans 

Barnes, Ray, Johnson, T., Bales, H., White, Chas., University City UMC, 
Charlotte, NC 22077-MN-454.1-D Involvement of Local Church Pastor- 
Parish Relation Committee in Joint Review Committee Process 

Bamett, Jim, SIL 21527-MN-509-D Discontinuation of Office 

Bamett, Jim, SIL 22039-MN-53-C Limitation of Tenure for Bishops 

Barrett, R. Dulaney, NMX 22060-MN443-D Elders in Administrative/Pro- 
gram Positions 

Barrett, R. Dulaney, NMX 22406-DI-NonDis-O The Confessional Move- 
Barrett, R. Dulaney, NMX 22413-MN-53-C Episcopal Tenure 

Barrett, R. Dulaney, NMX 22419-MN-514.8-D Specific Responsibilities of 
Bishops 

Barrett, R. Dulaney, NMX 22438-LC-210-D Church Membership 

Barrett, R. Dulaney, NMX 22439-LC-245-D Organization and Administra- 
tion of the Local Church 

Barrett, R. Dulaney, NMX 22444-LC-270.2-D Committee on Pastor-Parish 
Relations 

Barrett, R. Dulaney, NMX 22459-CS-NonDis-O Leadership by the Church 
Regarding the Use of Tobacco 

Barrett, R. Dulaney, NMX 22480-GJ-NonDis-O Church Structure 

Bartlett Chapel UMC+ 1 1 Adm. Bds +15 Church Groups, + 669 Indi- 
viduals 20826-MN-402,2-D Human Sexuality 

Bassett, Lowell D.,Hilliard UMC, Hilliard, OH 22216-DI-NonDis-O The 
Membership Vows 

Bast, Robert D., Sunrise UMC, Phoenix, AZ 20985-CS-72-D The Social 
Community 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 
22966-MN-315-D Relationship to the Employing Agency 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Trinity UMC, Salem and Beaver- 
ton, OR, 23066-MN-437-D Responsibilities and Duties of a Pastor 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Trinity UMC, Salem and Beaver- 
ton, OR, 23068-MN-439-D The Responsibilities of a Ministiy Specialist 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Trinity UMC, Salem and Beaver- 
ton, OR, 23065-MN-436-D AppoinbnenI to Various Ministiies 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Trinity UMC, Salem and Beaver- 
ton, OR, 23064-MN-435-D The Appointinent System 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Trinity UMC, Salem and Beaver- 
ton, OR, 23069-MN-440-D Special Provisions 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Trinity UMC, Salem and Beaver- 
ton, OR, 23063-MN-434-D Appointments to Various Ministiies 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Trinity UMC, Salem and Beaver- 
ton, OR, 23067-MN-438-D A Minisby Specialist 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Trinity UMC, Salem and Beaver- 
ton, OR, 23044-MN-411-D Certification 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Trinity UMC, Salem and Beaver- 
ton, OR, 23062-MN-429-D Transfers 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Trinity UMC, Salem and Beaver- 
ton, OR, 23043-MN-410-D Continuance as an Apprentice Minister 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 
22983-MN-314-D Specific Requirements for Certification as Pastor 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, THnity UMC, Salem and Beaver- 
ton, OR, 23042-MN-409-D Categories of Apprentice Minister 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Trinity UMC, Salem and Beaver- 
ton, OR, 23048-MN415-D Specific Requirement for Certification as Min- 
isU-y Specialist 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Trinity UMC, Salem and Beaver- 
ton, OR, 23061-MN428-D Appoir 



Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Trinity UMC, Salem and Beaver- 
ton, OR, 2304I-MN-408-D Credential as Apprentice Minister 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Trinity UMC, Salem and Beaver- 
ton, OR, 23040-MN-407-D Apprentice Ministers 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Trinity UMC, Salem and Beaver- 
ton, OR, 23039-MN-406-D General Provisions 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Trinity UMC, Salem and Beave- 
ton, OR, 23038-MN-403-D Transitional Provisions 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Trinity UMC, Salem and 
Beavertson, OR, 23037-MN-402-D The Nature of Ministiy and Ordina- 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Trinity UMC, Salem and Beaver- 
ton, OR, 23060-MN-427-D Historic Examination for Admission into Full 
Coimection 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Trinity UMC, Salem and Beaver- 
ton, OR, 23059-MN-426-D Requirements for Admission 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Trinity UMC, Salem and Beaver- 
ton, OR, 23058-MN-425-D Rights and Responsibilities 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia , Trinity UMC, Salem and 
Beaverton, OR, 23057-MN-424-D Members in Full Connection 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 
22980-MN-311-D Certification 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 
22982-MN-313-D Educational Requirements 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Trinity UMC, Salem and Beaver- 
ton, OR, 23047-MN-414-D Specific Requirements for Certification as Pas- 



, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Trinity UMC, Salem and Beaver- 
ton, OR, 23046-MN-413-D Educational Requirements 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Trinity UMC, Salem and Beaver- 
ton, OR, 23056-MN-423-D Continuance as Licensed Ministers 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Trinity UMC, Salem and Beaver- 
ton, OR, 23055-MN-422-D Eligibility and Rights of Licensed Ministers 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Trinity UMC, Salem and Beaver- 
ton, OR, 23054-MN-421-D Discontinuance from Probationary Member- 
ship 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Trinity UMC, Salem and Beaver- 
ton, OR, 23053-MN-420-D Continuation in Probationary Membership 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Trinity UMC, Salem and Beaver- 
ton, OR, 23052-MN-419-D Qualification for Election to Probationary Mem- 
bership 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Trinity UMC, Salem and Beaver- 
ton, OR, 23051-MN-418-D EUgibility and Rights of Probationary Members 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Trinity UMC, Salem and Beaver- 
ton, OR, 23050-MN4I7-D Discontinuance fi-om Certification 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 
22979-MN-31(>D Continuance as an Apprentice Minister 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyer, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 22978- 
MN-309-D Categories of Apprentice Minister 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Trinity UMC, Salem and Beave- 
ton, OR, 23045-MN-412-D Qualification for Certification 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Trinity UMC, Salem and Beaver- 
ton, OR, 23036-MN-401-D Relation to the Ministry of All Christians 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 
23008-MN-340-D Special Provisions 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 
23007-MN-339-D The Responsibilities of a Ministry SpeciaUst 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 
23006-MN-338-D A Ministiy Specialist 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 
23005-MN-439-D Responsibilities and Duties of a Pastor 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 
23004-MN-336-D Appointinent to Various Ministiies 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 
23003-MN-437-D The Appointinent System 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 
23002-MN-436-D Appointinents to Various Ministiies 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 
23001-MN433-D Classification of Ordination 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 
2300O-MN-432-D The Act of Ordination 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 
22999-MN-4 31-D Ordination 

Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 
22998-MN-430-D Recognition of Orders 



42 



Daily Edition Vol. 5 No. 1 



Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 

22997-MN427-D Transfers 
Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 

22996-MN-426-D Appointments 
Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 
22995-MN425-D Historic Examination for Admission into Full Conneclion 
Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 

22994-MN-424-D Requirements for Admission 
Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 

22993-MN-422-D Members in Full Connection 
Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 

22992-MN-323-D Continuance as Licensed Ministers 
Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 

22991-MN-322-D Eligibility and Rights of Licensed Ministers 
Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 

22990-MN-418-D Discontinuance from Probationary Membership 
Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 

22989-MN-320-D Continuation in Probationary Membership 
Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 22988-MN-414- 

D Qualification for Election to Probationary Membership 
Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 

22987-MN-413-D Ebgibility and Rights of Probationary Members 
Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 

22986-MN-317-D Discontinuance from Certification 
Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 

22985-MN-316-D Continuation of Certification 
Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 
22984-MN-315-D Specific Requirement for Certification as Ministry Special- 
ist 
Bateman, Ann and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beavertson, OR, 22947- 

MN-108-D Representative Ministry 
Bateman, Ann and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 22948- 

MN-109-D Diaconal Ministry 
Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 

22949-MN-llO-D Ordained Ministry 
Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 

22950-MN-lll-D Diaconal Ministiy 
Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 

22951-MN-301-D Relation to the Ministry of All Christians 
Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 

22952-MN-423-D Rights and Responsibilities 
Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 

22953-MN-302-D The Nature of Diaconal Ministiy 
Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaveton, OR, 22954- 

MN-303-D Enti-ance into Diaconal Ministiy 
Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 

22955-MN-304-D Candidacy for Diaconal Ministry 
Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 

22956-MN-305-D Continuation of Candidacy 
Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 

22957-MN-306-D Completion of Candidacy 
Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 

22958-MN-307-D Consecration 
Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 

22959-MN-308-D General Provisions 
Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 

22960-MN-309-D Rights of Diaconal Ministers 
Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 

22961-MN-310-D Service Appoinbnent of Diaconal Ministers 
Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 

22962-MN-311-D Credentials and Records 
Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 

22963-MN-312-D Transfers 
Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 

22964-MN-313-D Change in Conference Relationship 
Bateman, Ann C. and Meyer, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 22965- 

MN-314-D Relationship to tiie Charge Conference 
Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 

22981-MN-312-D Qualification for Certification 
Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 

22967-MN-316-D The Employing Agency 
Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 

22968-MN-317-D Termination Procedures for Diaconal Ministers 
Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Trinity UMC, Salem and Beaver- 
ton, OR, 23049-MN-416-D Continuation of Certification 



Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 

2297O-MN-301-D Relation to the Ministry of All Christians 
Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia,, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 

22971-MN-302-D The Nahire of Ministiy and Ordination 
Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 

22972-MN-303-D Transitional Provisions 
Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 

22973-MN-404-D Entrance into Ordained Ministiy 
Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 

22974-MN405-D Continuation of Candidacy 
Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 

22975-MN-306-D General Provisions 
Bateman, Ann C. and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 

22976-MN-307-D Apprentice Minister 
Bateman, Ann and Meyers, Patricia, Salem and Beaverton, OR, 22977- 

MN-308-D Credential as Apprentice Minister 
Beckford, Lewis H., MEN 22684-LC-2533.2-D Purchase of Local Church 

Insurance 
Bell, Howard S., SIL 20780-CO-35-C Composition of Annual Conference 
BeU, Howard S.,SIL 20783-CO-608.7-D Printing of petitions in tiie Advance 

Edition of the Daily Christian Advocate 
BeU, Howard S., SIL 20798-GJ-62-C Amendment to the Constihition 
BeU, Howard S., SIL 20873-CO-602-D Composition of General Conference 
BeU, Howard, SIL 20101-LC-270.1-D Adminish-ative Committees 
Berg, Avis + 4 Other Individuals, Flagstaff UMC, Flagstaff, AZ 22707- 

GJ4-C The Inclusiveness of the Church 
Berg, Avis and 4 others. Federated UMC, Flagstaff, AZ, 22876-CS-71-D 

Human Sexuality 
Berg, Avis and 4 other individuals. Federated UMC, Flagstaff, AZ 

22869-GJ-NonDis-C The delusiveness of the Church 
Berman, Carol Bauer, St. John's of Baltimore UMC, Baltimore, MD 

20973<;S-NonDis-O "Open the Door" to all God's children 
Beulah UMC, Pueblo, CO, 23030-MN408.5-D Consistency in Responsibili- 
ties & IMvileges of Ordained and Local Pastors 
BiUings, James J., First UMC, Del Rio, TX 22412-Dl-NonDis-O A Pro- 
posal of Belief for the United Methodist Church 
BiUings, James J., First UMC, Del Rio, TX 22453-CS-NonDis-O Church 

and Homosexuals 
Bishop Ann B. Sherer and Area Cabinet, MOW, MOE 20730-LC-2540.3-D 
Unincorporated Ijjcal Church Property-Sale, Transfer, Lease or Mortgage 
Bishop Ann B. Sherer and Area Cabinet, MOW, MOE 20731-LC-2541.3-D 

Incorporated Local Church Property - Sale, Transfer, Lease or Mortgage 
Black Methodist for Church Renewal 22193-CO-NonDis-O Black Leader- 
ship in Annual, Jurisdictional and General Conference Levels 
Black Methodist for Church Renewal 22249-FA-NonDis-O Continue 

Funding for Africa University 
Black Methodist for Church Renewal 22341-CS-NonDis-O In Favor of 

Human Intervention: No Military Involvement 
Black Methodist for Church Renewal 22342-CS-NonDis-O Comprehen- 
sive Health Care 
Black Methodist for Church Renewal 22354-CO-NonDis-O Etiinic Mem- 
bership on Conference Boards and Agencies 
Black Methodist for Church Renewal 22355-GJ-NonDis-O Black Church 

Growth 
Black Methodist for Church Renewal 22491-GM-NonDis-O AIDS 
Black Methodist for Church Renewal 22666-HE-NonDis-O Historically 
Black Colleges Related to the United Methodist Church and the Black 
College Fund. 
Blankenship, Paul F., MEM 22748-DI-NonDis-O "GuideUnes" the UMC 

and the Charismatic Movement be Printed in tiie Book of Resolutions 
Blankenship, Paul F., MEM 22865-D1-66-D A Resolution of Intent 
Blankenship, Paul F., MEM, 23070-DI-66-D Resolution of Intent 
BMCR, Native American International Caucus 22264-GJ-NonDis-O 

Strengtiiening tiie Black Church for die 21sL Cenhiry 
BMCR 22030-lC-NonDis-O Sexism 
BMCR 2203MC-NonDis-O Racism 

BMCR 22101-MN-NonDis-O Afiican American Clergywomen 
BMCR 22266-GJ-NonDis-O Ethnic Local Church Concerns 
BMW Conference Board of Ordained Ministiy, Washington, DC 20781- 

CO-36-C Lay Members voting on the Board of Ordained Ministiy 
BMW, NNJ, NEB, SNJ, CAP, EOH, NYK, WOH, NIL, GBCS 20078-GM- 
NonDis-OS Continue Emphasis on the Implementation of the National 
Plan for Hispanic-American Ministries 



April 16, 1996 



BMW, Vm, NEB, WPA, NNY, NIN, UMCOM, SIN,PED, CIL 20518-CO- 
700-DS Annual Conference Commission on Communications 

BMW, VIR, NEB, WPA, NNY 20492-CO-726.5-D Other Committees and 
Responsibilities 

BMW 20185-CO-36C Voting rights oflay members of Annual Conference 

BMW 20187-CO-707.1-D Mandated stiiictures provided by Annual Confer- 
ence 

BMW 20191-CO-707-D Conference Agencies 

BMW 20192-FA-709.2-D Membership of Conference Finance and Admini- 
stration 



BMW 20194-CO-752-D The District Council 

BMW 20226-MN-402.2-D Deanition of a self-avowed practicing homosexual 
BMW 20231-CO-NonDis-O Responsibility of Annual Conference staff per- 
sons 
BMW 20240-IC-738-D Commission on Archives and History 
BMW 21125-CO-NonDis-OS Appoint a Task Force to rewrite sections of the 

Book of Discipline 
Board of Ordained Ministry, ORI 22374-MN-453-D Location by Mutual 
Consent 



Board of Ordained Ministiy, ORI 22378-MN-454.1-D Joint Review Com- 
mittee 

Board of Trustees, Branch HiU UMC, Loveland, OH 21033-LC-2542-D 
Disposition of Church building or parsonage 

Booth, Karen S. , FED 22859-M N-NonDis-0 A Resolution on the Women's 
Spirituality Movement and the United Methodist Church 

Brewer, Timodiy, Dr., STX 20818-MN-515.4-D Distiict Superintendency 

Broussard, Margaret R., Florida Conference Council on Ministries, FL 
22732-CS-NonDis-O Environmental Protection 

Brown, George C, PNW 22183-CO-726.10-D Responsibilities of the Annual 
Conference Council on Minishies 



Buchanan, Sam A. Jr., Belmont UMC, NashviUe, TN 22703-MN-NonDis- 

Develop a Plan for Filling Senior Ministerial Positions 
Byroads, Marjone, Williams Center Asbury UMC, Biyan, OH 22557-Dl- 

NonDis-0 Evangelism as a Missional Priority of the United Methodist 

Church for the next Quadrennium 
Byroads, Marjorie, Williams Center Asbury UMC, Biyan, OH 2257W:S- 

71-D Human Sexuality 
Byroads, Marjorie, Williams Center Asbury UMC, Bryan, OH 22581-CS 

71-D Abortion 
Byroads, Marjorie, Williams Center Asbury UMC, Bryan, OH 22834- 

MN402.2-D Ordination, Appointment and/or Reappointinent of a Practic- 
ing Homosexual 
Cabinet of the West Virginia Annual Conference, WVA 20535<;O-507. ID 

Assignment of Bishops 
Cabinet of the West Virginia Annual Conference, WVA 20536-FA-717-D 

Clergy Support 
Cabinet of the West Virginia Annual Conference, WVA 20537-LC-252-D 

Removing Officers-Filling Vacancies 
Cabinet of the West Virginia Annual Conference, WVA 20538-MN-406. 10- 

D Appeal Process for Local Pastors 
Cabinet of the West Virginia Annual Conference, WVA 20539-MN-410.4- 

D Reinstatement of Local Pastor Stahis 
Cambre, Allison, TEX 20792-FA-NonDis-O Black College Fund 
Cambre, Allison, TEX 20794-FA-921.1-D The Ministerial Education Fund 
Cambre, Allison, TEX 20802-LC-264.1-D Program Agencies 
Cambre, Allison, TEX 20810-MN433-D Classification of Ordination 
Cambre, Allison, TEX 20812-MN437.2-D The Itinerant System 
Cambre, Allison, TEX 20813-MN-439.1-D Responsibilities and Duties of a 

Pastor 
Cambre, Allison, TEX 20814-MN-448 ID Leave of Absence 
Cambre, Allison, TEX 20824-MN-NonDis-OS Review of the Church 
Canada, Delace Rae, Christ UMC, Lehigh Acres, FL 22573-LC-253-D 

Work Area for Devotional Life in the Local Church 
Canady, DeArmond E., SCA 21550-MN-2626-D Trial Procedures 
CAP, KSE 20748-CS-71-D Human Sexuality 
CAP, WVA 20523<;S-NonDis-O Call for a Rebirth of Compassion 
CAP 20376-MN-2626.1-D General Fundamental Principles 



CAP 20377-MN-2626.3D Trial Procedures 
CAP 20525-CS-NonDis-O PubUc Funding of Federal Elections 
CAP 20527-GM-NonDis-O Reaffirming Shalom Zone Minishies 
CAP 20747-CS-71-D Human Sexuality 

Case, Riley B., NIN 22555-DI-68-D The Doctiinal Statement and Tradition 
Case, Riley B. , NIN 22559-FA-907-D Responsibilities of the General Coun- 
cil on Finance and Administration 
Case, Riley B., NIN 22567-GJ-810.2-D General Agency Membership 
Case, Riley B., NIN 22568-HE-1518.5-D Purposes and Objectives of the 

University Senate 
Case, Riley B., NIN 22570-LC-225-D Children and the Church 
Case, Riley B., NIN 22584-CS-72-D Rights of the Unborn 
Case, Riley B., NIN 22593-MN431.9-D Qualifications for Ordination 
Case, Riley B., NIN 22603-MN-1529-D Responsibilities of the Division of 

Ordained Ministry 
Case, Riley B., NIN 22646-FA-710-D Duties of the Annual Conference 

Council on Finance and Administration 
Case, Riley B., NIN 22667-IC-1906.1-D Responsibilities of the General 

Commission on Communication 
Case, Riley, B., NIN 22569-H&1519.3-D Purposes and Objectives of the 

University Senate 
Centenary UMC, ShelbyviUe, KY 20978CS-71-D Seek to find alternatives 
Centenary UMC, ShelbyviUe, KY 20979<:S-71-D Our belief in the santity 

of unborn human life 
Centenary UMC, ShelbyviUe, KY 2098(K:S-71-D Conflicts of life that may 

justify abortion 
Chai, Alice Yun, Christ UMC, Honolulu, HI 21513<;S-NonDis-0 Chung- 

shindae/"Comfort Women'VSex Slaves Drafted by Japan During World 

War II 
Chapman, Ruth, Blanchard Pine River UMC, Remus, MI 22811-LC- 

247.7-D Charge and Church Conference, Absentee Ballots 
Chapman, Ruth, Blanchard Pine River UMC, Remus, MI 22812-LC-249- 

D The Church Conference 
Charles D. White Jr., Western North Carolina Annual Conference 

20753-MN-454-D General Provisions 
Charies Wilder, Oak Park United Methodist Church, BartlesvUle, OK 

20790-DI-NonDis-O Lay Speakers Training 
Chesnut, James W. & Edgar, Dave, Trinity UMC, San Antonio, TX. 

22630-Dl-NonDis-O Affirmation of the Dochinal Standards 
Christensen.Faye, Fithian,Marylee, Lundeen, Betty, UMC, Brainerd, 

Minneapolis, New Brighton, MN 21557-lC-NonDis-O Membership of 

Gideons International 
Christian Educators FeUowship of the UMC 22578-LC-NonDis-O Dis- 
continue the term "Pastor-Parish Relations Committee' 
Christian Educators FeUowship 22109-LC-225-D Children and The 

Church 



Christian Educators FeUowship 22114-LC-248.9-D Powers and Duties of 

the Charge Conference 
Christian Educators Fellowship 22115-LC-248.11-D Powers and Duties of 

the Charge Conference 
Christian Educators FeUowship 22119-L&255^D Membership of the Ad- 
■ Board 



Christian Educators Fellowship 22126-LC-262.4-D The Chairperson of 



Church & Society Committee t 57 Members, First UMC, Ypsilanti, MI 

22831-MN-402.2-D The Ordained Ministiy 
Church and Society Committee ■► 55 Individuals, First UMC, YpsUanti, 

MI, 22879-CS71-D Human Sexuality 
Church and Community Workers National Organization, WV 22674-LC- 

206.4-D SU-engthening Cooperative Ministries through Training 
Church Conference, Old Zion and Big Bend UMC, Emienton, PA 

22499-CS-71-D Rights of Homosexual Persons 
Church Conference, Old Zion and Big Bend UMC, Emienton, PA 

22502-CS-71-D Abortion 
Church Conference, Old Zion and Big Bend UMC, Emienton, PA 

22506-CSR125-U Responsible Parenthood 



Daily Edition Vol. 5 No. 1 



Church Conference, Van & HiU City, Old Zion and Big Bend UMC, 
Cranberry and Emienton, PA 22833-MN402.2-D The Practice of Ho- 
mosexuality 

Church Conference, Van and Hill City IMC, Cranberry, PA 22583^5- 
71-D Abortion 

Church Conference, Van and HUl City UMC, Cranberry, PA 22613-CS- 
71-D Rights of Homosexual Persons 

Church Conference, Van and Hill City UMC, Cranberry, PA 22616<;S^ 
R126-L' Responsible Parenthood 

Church Congregation, Lake Harriet UMC, MinneapoUs, MN, 2289CM:S- 
NonDis-0 Calling for a Ban on Anti-Personnel Land Mines 

Church Council, Calvaiy UMC, Flint, MI 22496-CS-71-D Homosexual 
Behavior 

Church Council, Calvary UMC, Flint, MI 2250(W;S-71-D Regarding 
Abortion 

Church Membership, First UMC, Pueblo, CO 22417-MN-452.5-D Re 
tired Ministers' Report 

Church of the Redeemer * 6 Other Church Groups +,114 Individuals 
21030-LC-208-D Church Membership 

CIL 22015-IC-738.1-D Commission on Archives and History 

CIL 22016-IC-739.1-D Commission on Christian Unity and Inten-eligious 
Concerns 

CIL 22017-1C-740.1-D Commission on Religion and Race 

CIL 22018-IC-741-D Commission on Status and Role of Women 

CIL 22019-IC-742-D Commission on Small Membership Church 

CIL 22021-1C-R245-U Ecumenical Decade: Sobdarity with Women 

CIL 22032-IC-NonDis-O Eradication of Racism in the United Methodist 
Church 

CIL 22181-CO-726-D Flexibility in Conference Council on Ministiies 

CIL 2218&CO-747-D Committee on Minishy to Persons with Handicapping 
Conditions 

CIL 22200-DI-729-D Conference Board of Discipleship 

CIL 22202-D I-730.1-D Conference Board of Laity 

CIL 22203-DI-745-D Establish Young Adult Ministiy 

CIL 22258-CO-NonDis-O Paragraph Changes in The Book of Discipline 

CIL 22262-GJ-748-D Committee on Native American Ministiy 

CIL 22265-GJ-NonDis-O Regarding Restinicturing lor Equality 

CIL 22268-HE-732-D Board of Higher Education & Campus Ministiy 

CIL 22278-GM-731-D Board of Global Ministiies 

CIL 22329-CS-728-D Boardof Church and Society 

CIL 22337-CS-R23^U Regarding Tobacco Marketing 

CIL 22338<:S-R634-U Regarding Recognition of Cuba 

CIL 22343<;S-NonDis-0 Regarding CUnic Violence 

CIL 22492-IC-NonDis-O Regarding Racism Today 

Circle C Class, First UMC, Moline, IL 20060-CS-75-D The World Com- 
munity 

Circle C Class, United Methodist Church, MoUne, IL 20058<;S-74-D 
Education for all 

Clark, Stephen E., First United Methodist Church of Glendale, Glen- 
dale, AZ 20777-CO-NonDis-O Churches outside the United States 

Clark, Stephen E., First United Methodist Church, Phoenix, AZ 20006- 
LC-247-D Membership of the Charge Conference 

Clark, Stephen E., First United Methodist Church, Phoeniz, AZ 20800- 
GM-NonDis-0 Restructure of the General Board of Global Ministiies 

CLZ, 23022-CC-NonDi^D Creation of a Centi-al Conference 

CLZ, 23021-CC-NonDis-D Creation of a New Conference 

CLZ, 2302&<;O-NonDis-O Global Nature of the Church 

CNV, CAP 20024-CS73-D The Rights of all Persons 

CNV, NEB, NIL, NIN 20228-CS-NonDis-O Tobacco Marketing by Philip 
Morris and RJR Nabisco 

CNV, NNJ, NYK, NIL, GBCS, NYMO 20122-CS-71-D Human Sexuality 

CNV, NNY 20515-GJ-NonDis-O Retain the Headquarters of the General 
Board of Global Ministiies in New York City 

CNV, WPA 20229-CS-70.1-D A Dioxin-free fuhire 

CNV, WYO 20238-GJ-NonDis-O The Church and God's Creation 

CNV 20003-CS-R536-U U.S. Gun Violence 

CNV 20022-CS-71-D Equal protection and ti-eatinent within the United Meth- 
odist Church 

CNV 20133-MN-402.2-D Human Sexuality 

CNV 20134-MN-402.2-D Affirm the Right of all Persons who are Called 

CNV 20135-MN-402.2-D Faithful in all Relationships 

CNV 20269-DI-28O-D Certified Uy Speaker 



CNV 20272-DI-278-D The Lay Speaker's Program 
CNV 20273-DI-279-D Local Church Lay Speaker 
Coates, Harry H. & Peggy, First UMC, Claremore, OK 22685-LC-2534.5- 

D Permanent Endowment Fund Committee 
Cobb, Flora Thompson, Edenton St. UMC, Raleigh, NC 2005&<;S-71-D 

Rights of Homosexual Persons 
Cobb, Flora Thompson, Edenton St. UMC, Raleigh, NC 20057-CS-71-D 

Abortion 



Coile, James H., NCA 22160-CO-506.1-D Election 

Colbeth, Carol A., Foundry UMC, Washington, DC 22449-CS-73-D Con- 
sumption 

Colbedi, Carol A, Foundry UMC, Washington, DC 2245aCS-73-D Pov- 
erty 

Colbeth, Carol A, Foundry UMC, Washington, DC 22451-CS-73-D Mi- 
grant Workers 

Colbeth, Carol A, Foundry UMC, Washington, DC 22481-GJ-NonDis-O 
Guidelines lor Labor Relations in United Methodist Church and Related 
Institutions 

Commission on Pan-Methodist Cooperation, COB 21726-IC-NonDis-OS 
Establish a Commission on Union (Pan-Methodist) 

Commission on Pan-Methodist Cooperation 21722-CO-707.4-D Annual 
Conference Agencies 

Commission on Pan-Methodist Cooperation 21723-GJ-NonDis-O Pro- 
grammatic Responsibilities for Su-engthening the Black Church (Pan-Meth- 
odist) 

Commission on Pan-Methodist Cooperation 21724-HE-NonDis-O Reso- 
lution on Incorporation (Pan-Methodist) 

Commission on Pan-Methodist Cooperation 21729-IC-2403-D Commis- 
sion on Pan-Methodist CooporaUon 

Commission on The General Conference 2216&CO-608.1-D Petitions to 
General Conference 

Commission on The General Conference 22167-CO-608.3-D Petitions to 
General Conference 

Commission on The General Conference 22168-CO-608.6-D Petitions to 
General Conference 

Commission on The General Conference 22170-CO-608.8-D Petitions to 
General Conference 

Commission on The General Conference 22171-CO-608.9-D Petitions to 
General Conference 

Committee on Finance, Perry UMC, Peny, GA 22143-LC-270.4-D Mem- 
bership of the Local Church Fuiance Committee 

Conf. B.G.M.,MOW, Native American International, Caucus, 2 local 
Churches 20796-GJ-NonDis-O Relocation of the General Board of 
Global Ministries 

Conference Board of Diaconal Ministry, CAP, SIN, DAK 20908-MN- 
313.2-D The Relationship of a Retired Diaconal Minister to a Charge 
Conference 

Conference Board of Diaconal Ministry, CAP 20902-LC-247.2-D The 
Membership of Charge Conference 

Conference Board of Diaconal Ministry, CAP 21518-GJ-276-D Ministry 
Sunday 

Conference Board of Diaconal Ministty, EPA 20871-CO-NonDis-O Rep- 
resentation of Diaconal Ministers among those elected to General and 
Jurisdictional Conferences 

Conference Board of Diaconal Ministiy, OKL 20905-MN-304-D Candi- 
dacy for Ordained Ministry 

Conference Board of Diaconal Minisfiy, OKL 20906-MN-306.1-D Com- 
pletion of Candidacy 

Conference Board of Diaconal Ministry, OKL 20907-MN-310-D Service 
Appointment of Diaconal Ministers 

Conference Board of Diaconal Ministiy, OKL 20909-MN-314.4-D Rela- 
tionship to the Charge Conference 

Conference Board of Diaconal Ministiy, OKL 20911-MN-318-D TheDia- 
conal Minister 

Conference Board of Diaconal Ministiy, SCA 20793-FA-921.1-D The 
Ministerial Education Fund 

Conference Board of Diaconal Ministry, SCA 20821-MN-306.2-D Candi- 
dacy for Diaconal Ministiy 

Conference Board ofDiaconal Ministiy, SCA 20833-MN-734.1-D Confer- 
ence Board of Diaconal Ministiy 

Conference Board of Diaconal Ministiy, SCA 20884-FA-1606.2-D Annual 
Conference Administi-ation 



April 16, 1996 



45 



Conference Board of Diaconal Ministry, SCA 20885^FA1606.20-D Pow- 
ers. Duties, and Responsibilities of Annual Conference 

Conference Board of Diaconal Ministry. SCA 20910-MN-315-D Relation 
ship to the Employing Agency 

Conference Board of Laity, SIN 21466-D1-278-D Lay Speaking Ministry 

Conference Board of Ordained Ministry, BMW 20809-MN-402 2-D Defi 
nition of a self-avowed practicing homosexual 

Conference Board of Ordained Ministry, IWA 20827-MN-402.2-D Hu 
man Sexuality 

Conference Board of Ordained Ministry, ORI 22391-MN-2622-D Fair 
Process 

Conference Board of Ordained Ministry, SCA 20820-MN-306.1-D Com- 
pletion of Candidacy 

Conference Board of Ordained Ministry, SCA 20832-MN-733.1-D Con 
ference Board of Ordained Ministry 

Conference Board of Ordained Ministry, WPA 21532-MN-733.1-D Ex- 
tending Voting Privileges of Lay Persons on the Board of Ordained Ministry 

Conference Board of Pension, WNC 22256-FA-NonDis-O Study Ministe- 
rial Pension Plan Article 401a and Supplement One 

Conference Cabinet, SCA 22366-MN-317-D Diaconal Ministers Relation- 
ship to the Employing Agency 

Conference Cabinet, SCA 22367-LC-248.13-D Powers and Duties of the 
Charge Conference 

Conference Cabinet, SCA 22368-LC-257.3-D Responsibilities of the Admin- 
istrative Board 

Conference Cabinet, SCA 22369-LC-270.2-D Responsibilities of tine Com- 
mittee on Pastor-Parish Relations 

Conference Cabinet, SCA 22370-LC-270.2-D Duties of tiie Committee on 
Pastor-Parish Relations 

Conference Cabinet, SGA 20799-MN-NonDis-O Trial Procedures 

Conference Cabinet, SGA 20831-MN-519-D The normal term of a Distinct 
Superintendent 

Conference United Methodist Women, STX 20903-MN-NonDis-O Spe- 
cific Responsibilities of the Board of Ordained Ministiy 

Conference United Methodist Women, STX 20904-MN-NonDis-O Re- 
quirements for Admission 

Conferene Commission on Archives and History, BMW 22801-1C-1812-D 
Historic Sites, Historic Shrines, and Historic Landmarks 

Congregation + Byroads, Marjorie, OH, First UMC, Bayou La Batre, AL 
22621-CS-NonDis-O Membership in Religious Coalition for Reproductive 
Chojce 

Cook, Margaret, SL Paul's UMC, Coronada, CA 21549-MN-2625.1-D In- 
vestigation Procedures 

Cornerstone and Friendly Hour Classes, First UMC, Crawfordville, IN, 
22885-CS-71-D Abortion 

CottrcU, David R., WOH 22349-CS-NonDis-O Total Tissue Transplant Pro- 
gram 

Council of Bishops 21717-IC-2006.1-D Organization of tiie General Com- 
mission on Christian Unity and Interreligious Concerns 

Council of Bishops 21718-CO-NonDis-O Report The Global Nahire of The 
Church 

Council of Bishops 21728-IC-2402.2-D Councils and Consultations of 
Churches 

Council of Bishops 21730-MN-510 ID Statiis or Retired Bishops 

Council on Finance and Administration, AFL 20791-FA-NonDis-O Level 
Funding in the total Apportioned Budget 

Council on Ministries, Jones Memorial UMC, Chattanooga, TN 22364- 
IC-NonDis-O Media Education to Restore High Ideals and Values to tile 
Entertainment Industiy 

CPA 20280-MN-436-D General Provisions 

CPA 20281-MN-437-D The Itinerant System 

Criminal Justice and Mercy Ministries, SEJ 22127-LC-262.5-D Criminal 
Justice and Mercy MinisQies as a Responsibility of tiie Evangelism Work 
Area 

Criminal Justice and Mercy Ministry Fellowship,SEJ 22124-LC-262.2-D 
Criminal Justice and Mercy Ministry as a Responsibility of Church and 
Society Work Area 

Criminal Justice and Mercy Ministry, SEJ 22125-LC-262.3-D Criminal 
Justice and Mercy Ministries as a Means of Utilizing Community Volunteers 

Criminal Justice and Mercy Ministry, SEJ 22132-LC-264 7-D Local 
Church Committee on Criminal Justice and Mercy Ministiies 

Crouch, William C, NTX 22626-CO-750-D The Distiict Conference 

Crowe, John M., NCA 22594-MN-437.4-D The Itinerant System 

Crowe, John M., NCA 22601-MN-533.2D The Process of Appointment 
Making 



CTX, NEB 20107-DI-NonDis-O Affirm tiie Council of Bishop's statement on 

Wisdom and our Doch-inal Standards and Theological Task 
CTX, WVA, NIL 20221-lC-NonDis-O The Ecumenical Decade 
CTX 20012-FA-NonDis-O$ Continue Funding tiie area of Abuse and/or Mis- 
use of Drugs and Alcohol 
Culver, William Lawson, Harper Chapel UMC, Osage Beach, MO 

22327-CS-75-D National Power and ResponsibiUty 
Cummings, Ben, Mr. & Mrs., UMC, Hope, AR 22470-FA-906.12-D 

Funds to Homosexual Groups 
Cummings, Ben Mr. & Mrs., Hope UMC, Hope, AR, 22907-MN-NonDis-O 

Exit Procedures 
Cunanan, Jose P.M., PHI, 23032-MN-518-D Limitation on Years of Service 
Cunanan, Jose P.M., PHI, 23028-LC-244-D Numerical Requirements m the 

Organization of a Local United Methodist Church 
Cunanan, Jose P.M., PHI, 23031-MN-517-D Election, Appointment and 

Term of DisU-ict Superintendents 
DAK, DET, NAL, CPA, NNY, WNY, KEN 20002-FA-NonDis-O$ 1997- 

2000 Apportioned General Funds 
Davis, Don C, NCA 20036-MN-NonDis-O Annual evaluation of clergy by 

Pastor-Parish Relations Committee 
Dawe, Esther, Bethany-Cahfaiy UMC, Wauwatosa, WI 22153-LC-Non- 

Dis-O Removal of Inactive Members 
Deborah Circle UMW, Cornerstone and Friendly Class, First UMC, 

Crawfordville, IN, 228 96-MN-402.2-D Human Sexuality 
Decker, David L., Rockville UMC, Rockville, MD 22252-FA-NonDis-O 

Conference Apportionments for Benevolences 
Decker, David L., Rockville UMC, Rockville, MD 22314-CS-71-D Abor- 



Decker, David L., Rockville UMC, RockvUIe, MD 22321-CS73-D The 
Economic Community 

Decker, David L., Rockville UMC, RockviUe,MD 22322-CS-73-D Collec- 
tive Bargaining 

Decker, David L., RockviUe UMC, RockviUe, MD 22323CS-73-D Work 
and Leisure 

Decker, David L., Rockville UMC, Rockville, MD 22324-CS-73-D Pov- 
erty 

Decker, David L., Rockville UMC, RockviUe, MD 22325-CS-74-D Basic 
Freedoms 

Decker, David L., Rockville UMC, Rockville, MD 2232&CS-74-D Mili- 
tary Service 

Decker, David L., Rockville UMC, Rockville, MD 22428-IC-NonDis-O 
Conference Publications 

Deer, Alvin, OKI 22781-GM-NonDis-O The Sand Creek Apology 

Deer, Alvin, OKL 22486-GM-NonDis-O Resolution to Support the Rehim of 
the FT. Reno, Oklahoma Lands to the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes 

Deer, Alvin, OKL 22487-GM-NonDis-O To Support Restittition to die Chey- 
enne and Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma for die Sand Creek Massacre 

DeLong, Evelyn L. + Sowell, Joe Rev. SCA, Calvary UMC, Circleville, 
OH 22716-1C-2201-D General Commission on tiie Status and Role of 
Women 

DeLong, Evelyn L, Canary UMC, CircleviUe, OH 22715-IC-741-D Con- 
ference Commission on tiie Status and Role of Women 

DeLong, Evelyn L., Cah^ary UMC, CircleviUe, OH 22718-LC-221-D Re- 
garding Baptism and Dedication 

Deppe, Martin, NIL 22686-MN-304.1-D Candidacy for Diaconal Ministiy 

Deppe, Martin, NIL 22688-MN-402.2-D Standards for Ordained Ministry 

Deppe, Martin, NIL 22692-MN414.4-D Qualifications for Election to Pro- 
bationary Membership 

Deppe, Martin, NIL 22693^MN-420.1-D Requirements for Election as Asso- 
ciate Members 

Deppe, Martin, NIL 22839-MN424-D Requirements for Admission 

Deppe, Martin, NIL 22841-MN-131.6-D Qualifications for Ordination 

Deppe, Martin, NIL, 22880^:S-71-D Human Sexuality 

DET Annual Conference Pornography Task Force, Riverview UMC, 
Rivervicw, Ml 22763-GJ-274-D Resolution to Conform to die Obser- 
vance of "Pornography Awareness Week " 

DET, KSE 20049-DI-282-D Lay Preacher 

DET, TRY 20064-CO-38<; Ministerial Delegates to Conferences 

DET, TOY 20065-Ca702. 1-D Voting Rights for Clergy Members 



Daily Edition Vol. 5 No. 1 



DET, TRY. SCA. NAL, KSE, NGA, MSS Coirf. UMW * 1 Dist. 20528-GM 

NonDisO Affirm the Purpose of United Methodist Women 
DET 20013-FA-723-D Basic Salary Plan-Option for Annual Conference 
DET 20048-D1-68-D Christian Unity 

DET 20077-GM-NonDis-O An Affirmation of Basic Rural Worth 
DET 20098-LC-261-D Local Church work area on Prayer 
DET 2CX)99-LC-262. ll-D Local Church Work Area on Prayer. 
DET 20102-LC-270.2-D Appointed Staff 
DET 20103-LC-270.2-D Pastor-Parish Relations Committee 
DET 20114-MN437-D Itinerate System 

DET 20138-MN-452-D Pension Liability of Retired Ordained Clergy 
DET 20147-MN-533.5-D Muldple Staff 

DET 20148-MN-533.5-D Appointment other than Pastor in Charge 
Diaconal Ministry Clearness Committee, 22937-MN-324-D Ministry of an 

Elder 
Diaconal Ministry Clearness Committee, 22936-MN-322-D Requirements 

for Admission of Deacon in Full Connection 
Diaconal Ministry Clearness Committee, 22935-MN-321-D Authority and 

Responsibilities of Deacons in Full Connection 
Diaconal Ministry Clearness Committee, 22934-MN-321-D The Ordained 

Deacon 
Diaconal Ministry Clearness Committee, 22933-MN-316-D The Ordained 

Deacon 
Diaconal Ministry Clearness Committee, 22932-MN-320-D Eligibility and 

Rights of Probationary Membership 
Diaconal Ministry Clearness Committee, 22931-MN-319-D Probationary 

Service 
Diaconal Ministry Clearness Committee, 22930-MN-317-D Qualifications 

for Consecration 
Diaconal Ministry Clearness Committee, 22929-MN-318-D Consecration 

as a Probationary Member 
Diaconal Ministry Clearness Committee, 22928-MN-315-D Orders in Rela- 
tion to Ministry of all Christians 
Diaconal Ministry Clearness Committee, 22927-MN-310-D Clergy Orders 
Diaconal Ministry Clearness Committee, 22926-MN-307-D Continuation of 

Candidacy 
Diaconal Ministry Clearness Committee, 22925-MN-306-D Candidacy for 

Ucensed and Ordained Ministry 
Diaconal Ministry Clearness Committee, 22924-MN-305-D Entrance into 

Licensed and Ordained Ministry 
Diaconal Ministry Clearness Committee, 22923-MN-304.1-D Qualifications 

for Ordination 
Diaconal Ministry Clearness Committee, 22922-MN-303.2-D Purpose of 

Ordination 
Diaconal Ministry Clearness Committee, 22921-MN-206-D Lay Minishy 

Stewards 
Diaconal Ministry Clearness Committee, 22920-MN-204-D Nature of Office 

of Lay Ministiy Steward 
Diaconal Ministry Clearness Committee, 22919-MN-202-D Christian Dis- 

cipleship 
Diaconal Ministry Clearness Committee, 22939-MN-424-D Require ments 

for Admission to Full Connection and Ordination as Elder 
Diaconal Ministry Clearness Committee, 22940-MN-407-D License as a 

Local Pastor 
Diaconal Ministry Clearness Committee, 22918-MN-llO-D Ordained Min- 
istry 
Diaconal Ministry Clearness Conmittee, 22938-MN-422-D Elders in Full 

Connection 
Diaconal Ministry Clearness Committee, 22941-MN-409-D Continuance as 

a Local Pastor 
Diaconal Ministry Clearness Committee, 22942-MN-410-D Exiting, Rein- 
statement, and Retirement of Local Pastors 
Diaconal Ministry Cleraess Committee, 22943-MN411-D Mentors 
Diaconal Ministry Clearness Committee, 22944-MN-733-D Conference 

Board of Ordained Ministry 
Diaconal Ministry Clearness Committee, 22945-MN-756.1-D Distinct Com- 
mittee on Ordained Ministry 
Diaconal Ministry Clearness Committee, 22946-MN-1508.1-D Divisions of 

General Board of Higher Education and Ministry 
Dickerson, Rusty, STX 22452-CS-NonDis-O Adoption vs. Abortion: Curb- 
ing Birth-Control Abortions 
District Superintendent Committee (SE District), SNJ 22084-MN-518-D 
Limitation on Years of Service 



District Superintendent Committee (SE District), SNJ 22085-MN-522-D 

Duties and Responsibilities of a Pastor 
District Superintendent Committee (SE District), SNJ 22086-MN-524-D 

Duties and Responsibilities of a Pastor 
DoUarhide, Charles, Village UMC, Oklahoma City, OK 22843-MN454.1- 



DoUarhide, Charles, VUlage UMC, Oklahoma City, OK 2285frMN-2625- 

D Investigation Procedures 
Donaldson, John, DKT 2261(>MN-NonDisO A Resolution for General 

Conference to Elect an Archbishop 
Donaldson, John, DKT 22701-MN-NonDis-O A Resolution for the General 

Conference: Academic Orthodoxy 
Drury, Steve, KEN 21010-GJ-NonDi5-O Relocation of the General Board of 

Global Minish-ies 
Echols, Vema K. & Echols, Scott K. Dr., First UMC, Lake Wales, FL 

22844-M N-454-D Promoting Holy Living for Pastors and Lay Involvement 

in Redressing Certain Grievances 
Echols, Vema K., First UMC, Lake Wales, FL 22618<;S-NonDis-0 In 

Support of die United States Food and Drug Administration 
Echols, Vema K., Lake Wales First UMC, Lake Wales, FL 22617-CS- 

NonDis-0 Reduce Environmental Tobacco Smoke 



Eckert, Jerry, WIS 20803-MN-2623.1-D Simplifying die Phrasing of the 

Charge 
Eckert, Jerry, WIS 21520-MN448-D Leave of Absence 
Eckert, Jerry, WIS 21521-MN-454-D Defining the Role of Advocate 
Eckert, Jerry, WIS 21522-MN-454.1-D Judicial Council Insistance on Me- 
diation 
Eckert, Jerry, WIS 21523-MN454.1-D Defining Who Signs a Grievance 
Eckert, Jerry, WIS 21524-MN454.1-D Grievance Procedures 
Eckert, Jeny, WIS 21525-MN-454.1-D Complying with Judicial Council's 

Offering and Defining Mediation 
Eckert, Jerry, WIS 21526-MN-454.1-D Grievances, Complaints, and 

Chargeable Offenses 
Eckert, Jerry, WIS 21543-MN-2622-D Providing the Right for the Accused 

to Face the Accusers 
Eckert, Jerry, WIS 21546-MN-2613-D A Way to Assure a Hearing by the 

Judicial Council Providing a Decision was not Reported 
Eckert, Jerry, WIS 21551-MN-2627.1-D Requiring Responseofthejurisdic- 

tional Appeals Committee 
Eckert, Jeny, WIS 21552-MN-2627.1-D Addition of a Tune Frame for the 

Jurisdictional Appeals Committee 
Eckert, Jeny, WIS 21553-MN-2628-D Impeachment Proceedings Against a 

Judicial Council Member 
Eckert, Jerry, WIS 22087-MN-525-D Grievance Procedures 
Eckert, Jerry, WIS 22104-LC-107-D Identifying the Primary Purpose of the 

Church and its Mirustry 
Eckert, Jerry, WIS 22187-CO-749-D Annual Conference Judiciary Commit- 



Eckert, Jerry, WIS 22353-CO-700-D Formation of an Annual Conference 

Committee on Petitions 
Eckert, Jerry, WIS 22357-FA-71 1 .3-D Definition of a Line Item for Use in 

preparing die Conference Budget 
Eckert, Jerry, WIS 22371-MN-410.3-D Trial of a Local Pastor 
Eckert, Jerry, WIS 22372-MN418-D Discontinuance of Probationary Mem- 
bers 
Eckert, Jeny, WIS 22373-MN452.5-D Rights of Retired Ordained Minis- 
ters 
Eckert, Jerry, WIS 22375-MN453.1-D Further Defining Honorable Loca- 
tion 
Eckert, Jerry, WIS 22376-MN454-D Grievance Procedures 
Eckert, Jerry, WIS 22379-MN454.3-D Deleting Administrative Location 
Eckert, Jerry, WIS 22381-MN-513-D Accountability of Bishops 
Eckert, Jerry, WIS 22382-MN-513,5-D Statute of Limitations for Bishops 
Eckert, Jeny, WIS 22383-MN-517-D Selecting, Training. Assigning, and 

Term of Disb-ict Superintendents 
Eckert, Jerry, WIS 22384-MN-524-D Non-PersonnelResponsibilitiesofDis- 

ti'ict Superintendents 
Eckert, Jeny, WIS 22386-MN-528.3-D Accountability of Distinct Superin- 
tendents 



April 16, 1996 



47 



Eckert, Jeny, WIS 22387-MN-735.3-D Annual Review of the Bishops Min- 

istiy 
Eckert, Jerry, WIS 22389-MN-759.4-D Annual Review of the District Super- 
intendent's Ministry 
Eckert, Jeny, WIS 22390-MN-2622D Complainants' Rights in Fair Process 
Eckert, Jerry, WIS 22392-MN-2623.1-D Rephrasing of the Charge 
Eckert, Jerry, 'WIS 22393-MN-2623.1-D Re: Phrasing of the Charge 
Eckert, Jeny, WIS 22394MN-2623.3-D A Charge that Could be used 

Against a Lay Person 
Eckert, Jerry, WIS 22395-MN-2625-D Grievance Procedures 
Eckert, Jerry, WIS 22396-MN-2626.1-D Granting the Executive Session 

Broader Responsibility 
Eckert, Jerry, WIS 22397-MN-NonDis-O Reinstatement and Recompense 

for Rev. Merrily Anderson 
Eckert, Jerry, WIS 22398-MN-NonDis-O Reinstatement and Recompense 

for Rev. Bill Brooks 
Eckert, Jerry, WIS 22399-MN-NonDis-O Reinstatement for Rev. Bruce 

Southard 
Eckert, Jerry, WIS 22400-MN-NonDis-O Reinstatement and Recompense 

for Rev. F.D. Tumey 
Eckert, Jerry, WIS 22402-MN-NonDis-O$ Formation of an Impartial Panel 
EUason, Hap, TEN 22074-MN-439-D Responsibilities and Duties of a Pastor 
Ellison, Floyd, DET 22678-LC-253.2D Need for Clarification of "Outreach" 

and "Church and Societal Issues" 
Elmslie, James S., Dr., First UMC, Salt Lake City, UT 22460-CSNonDis- 

World-Wide Celebration on Population 
Elrod, Caroline M., United Methodist Church, Indianapolis, IN 20005- 

LC-270,2-D Committee on Pastor-Parish Relations 
EOH 20271-FA-906.1-D Fiscal ResponsibiUties 
EOH 20702-CS-71-D Regarding Human Sexuality 
EOH 20703-CS-71-D Abortion 
EOH 20708<;O-3&C Election and Eligibility of Clergy Delegates to General 

and Jurisdictional Conferences 
EOH 20711-CO-702-D Part-Time Local Pastors 

EOH 20716-FA-709.2-D Membership on Annual Conference Council on Fi- 
nance and Administration 
EOH 20735-MN408.5-D Rights of Local Pastors 
EOH 20740-MN-436-D Appointments to Various Ministries 
EOH 20742-MN-449.1-D Family Leave 

EPA 2ei88-CO-702-D Composition and character of the Annual Conference 
EPA 20248-CS-NonDis-O Opposition to Abusive Treatment of Persons with 

Mental Disabilities 
EPA 20259-MN-733.1-D Electionof Board of Ordained Ministry Members 
EPA 20264-CO-NonDis-O Approach legislation on paragraph 71.F and all 

matters at Gen. Conf. with prayer and openess 
EPA 20265-MN-756.1-D Quadrennial Election of District Committees on Or- 
dained Ministry 
EPA Conference, 1 Adm. Board & 2 Individuals, 22894-GJNonDis-O 

Relocation of the GcneraL Board of Global Ministries 
Evangelical Fellowship for UM in West Virginia 22746-DI-NonDis-O 

Resolution to Affirm the Confessing Movement within the United Methodist 

Church 
EvangeUcal FeUowship for United Mediodist in WVA, 22895-MN-402.2-D 

Restricting Acceptance of Homosexuals for Ordination and Appointment 
FeUowship Sunday School Class, First UMC, Liberty, TX 22457-CS-Non- 

Dis-O Human Sexuality 
Ferris, Donald R., WMI 22697-MN-733.1-D Conference Board of Ordained 

Ministry 
Ferris, Donald R., WMI 22698-MN-756.1-D The District Committee on 

Ordained Ministry 
Fields, Thomas, Cape Girardeau UMC, Cape Girardeau, MO 20890-GM- 

NonDis-0 Requirements for Missionaries 
Fincher, Jabe Jr., AFL 20801-IC-NonDis-O Prejudice/Discrimination 
Fincher, JabeJr.,AFL 22259-FA-NonDis-O The Apportionments System 
Fincher, Jabe, Jr., AWF 20041-MN-NDIS-O Continuance as a Local Pastor 
Fireside Sunday School Class, Clark Memorial UMC, Oklahoma City, 

OK 20055-CS-71D An effort to clarify a position on the issue of Human 

Sexuality 
First UMC, Bridgeton, NJ 22229-FA-711.3-D Budgets 
First UMC, Bridgeton, NJ 22230-FA-712.1-D Apportionments 
First UMC, Bridgeton, NJ 22242-FA-911.5-D Apportionments 
First UMC, Broken Arrow, OK 22817-LC-270.2D The Make-up of the 

Committee on Pastor-Parish Relations (Staff-Parish Relations) 



First UMC, Broken Arrow, OK 22818-U;-270.2-D Dutiesof the( 
on Pastor-Parish Relations (Staff-Parish Relations) 

First UMC, Broken Arrow, OK 22819-LC-270.2-D Duties of the Committee 
on Pastor-Parish Relations (Staff-Parish Relations) 

First UMC, Lake Jackson, TX, 2290aDI-NonDis-O Resolution on Doctrinal 
Integrity, Administrative Board 

Fishel, Geo., Hopkins, Ron, Hossler, Robt, Rech,Ed, Wesley UMC, 
Marysville, PA 20862-CS-R536-U Gun Control and U.S. Gun Violence 

FLA 20199-CO-602-D Composition of General Conference 

FLA 20506-IC-NonDis-O Consultation on Church Union 

FLA 20514-FA-NonDis-OS 1997-2000 Budget for General Funds 

FLA 20750-FA-711.3-D World Service and Conference Benevolences 

Folkers, Robert L. + Bowyer, O. Richard, NEB & WVA 22661-GM-Non- 
Dis-0$ Cooperative Parish Ministry 

Forsman, Don L., NMX 22591-MN-412.1-D The Clergy Membership of an 
Annual Conference 

Forsman, Don L., NMX 22806-IC-2200-D$ General Commission on Alco- 
hol and Drugs 

Forsman, Don L., NMX 22827-MN-406.6-D Authority and Duties of a Local 
Pastor 

Francis, John Ed.& Carolyn +52 Other Missionaries, GBGM, World 
Division, Missionaries in Okinawa, Ginowan-shi, Okinawa 22348- 
CS-NonDis-O The Search for Peace and Justice in Okinawa 

Eraser, Marcia P. + Holly, Mary Lynn, First UMC, Franklin, TN 22762- 
GJ4-C Inclusiveness of the Church 

Frederick, Austin, Jr., STX 21534-GJ-802-D Amenability and Program Ac- 
countability 

Frederick, Austin, Jr., STX 21548-MN-2623.3-D Chargeable Offenses 

Friendly Hour and Cornerstone Classes, First UMC, Crawfordville, IN, 
228 99-CS-NonDis-O Support of the Religious Coalition for Reproductive 
Choice 

Fulton, Kenton W., Trinity UMC, Tulsa, OK 22141-LC-270.2-D Commit- 
tee on Pastor-Parish Relations 

Gardner, Larry * Gipson, Robert + Jones, Dale, Trinity UMC, Maysville, 
KY 22721-LC-257.3-D The Administrative Board, Powers and Duties 

Gardner, Larry + Gipson, Robert W. + Jones, Dale, KEN 22647-CO-704- 
D Powers and Duties of the Annual Conference 

GBCS, GBGM 21066-GM-NonDis-O Uberia 

GBCS 20918<:S-70-D Water, Air, Soil, Minerals, Plants 

GBCS 20919<;S-70-D Animal Life 

GBCS 2092OCS-70-D Space 

GBCS 20921-CS-70-D Science and Technology 

GBCS 20922-CS-71-D Divorce 

GBCS 20924-CS-72-D Rights of Religious Minorities 

GBCS 20925-CS-72-D Rights of Persons with Handicapping Conditions 

GBCS 20926^S-72-D Media Violence and Christian Values 

GBCS 20927-CS-72-D Right to Health Care 

GBCS 20928-CS-73-D Consumption 

GBCS 20929-CS-73-D Poverty 

GBCS 20930CS-73-D GambUng 

GBCS 20931-CS74-D PoUtical Responsibility 

GBCS 20932-CS-74-D Education 

GBCS 20933CS-74-D Civil Obedience and Civil Disobedience 

GBCS 20934-CS-74-D MiUtary Service 

GBCS 20935CS-728.1-D Annual Conference Board of Church and Society 

GBCS 2093&<;S728.2-D Membership of the Annual Conference Board of 
Church and Society 

GBCS 20937-CS-l 102-D Thepurposeof the Board of Church and Society 

GBCS 20938CS-1103-D Objectives 

GBCS 20939<:S-1104-D ResponsibiUties 

GBCS 20940<;S-1106-D Organization of the General Board of Church and 
Society 

GBCS 20941-CS-1107-D Vacancies 

GBCS 20942-CS-1108-D Officers 

GBCS 20943-CS-1109-D Executive Committee 

GBCS 20944-CSlllO-D Meetings 

GBCS 20945<:S-1111.1-D Financial Support 

GBCS 20946<;S-1111.2-D Financial Support 

GBCS 20947-CS-1112-D Internal Organization 

GBCS 20948<;S-1113.1-D Staff 

GBCS 20949CS-1113.2-D All other staff 



Daily Edition Vol. 5 No. 1 



GBCS 2(»5(K:S-1114-D Headquarters 

GBCS 20951-CS-1115-D Bylaws 

GBCS 20956-GMNonDis-O Continue Interagency Task Force on AIDS 

GBCS 20957-1jC-212-D The Meaning of Membership 

GBCS 20958-IjC-262.2-D The work area chairperson of Church and Society 

GBCS 20960-IjC-264.1-D The Church School 

GBCS 2103frCS-NonDis-O God's Vision of Abundant Living 

GBCS 21039<:SNonDls-O Caring Communities - The United Methodist 

Mental Illness Network 
GBCS 21040CS-NonDis-O Immigrants in the United States: Ministries of 

Hospitality. Advocacy and Justice 
GBCS 21041-CS-NonDis-O Observance of Health Care Sabbaths 
GBCS 21042-CS-NonDis-O Tobacco Marketing by Philip Morris and RJR 

Nabisco 
GBCS 21043<:S-NonDis-O The US Campaign for a Peace Tax Fund 
GBCS 21044^S-R517U Human Rights 
GBCS 2104SCS-R79-U The Law of the Sea 

GBCS 2104frCS-R87-U U.S. Agriculture and Rural Communities in Crisis 
GBCS 21047-CS-R229-U Dnig and Alcohol Concerns 
GBCS 21048CS-R412-U Gambling 

GBCS 2 1049-CS-R56 1-U Peace, The United Methodist Church and 
GBCS 2105CK;S-R633-U Ratification of United Nations Covenants and Con- 
ventions by the United States 
GBCS 21051-CS-R643-U Terrorism 
GBCS 21052-CS-R648-U In Support of the United Nations 
GBCS 21064-GM-NonDis-O National Observance of Children's Sabbaths 
GBCS 21065-GMNonDis-O Eradicating Abusive Child Labor 
GBCS 21078-IC-R248-U Global Racism 

GBGM, GBCS 21062-GM-NonDis-O World AIDS Day Observance 
GBGM, GBCS 21063-GM-NonDis-O Recognizing and Responding to the 

Many Faces of HfV/AIDS in the USA 
GBGM, GBOD 21347-GM-R135-U Putting Children and Their Families 

First 
GBGM.GBGD 21361-GM-NonDisO Reducing the Risk of ChUd Sexual 

Abuse in the Church 
GBGM 21296-GM-NonDis-O Restructure of the General Board of Global 

Ministries 
GBGM 21297-CO-664.6-D Assignment of Missionaries and Mission Travel- 
ing Preachers in the Conference 
GBGM 21298CO-664.7-D Administration, Initiation, and Coordination of a 

Mission 
GBGM 21299<;0-726.5-D Committees, Task Forces, and Consultations 
GBGM 2130OCO-726-D Committee on Hispanic Ministry 
GBGM 21301-FA-2554-D Trustees of Church Institutions 
GBGM 21302-GJ-275.2-D One Great Hour of Sharing 
GBGM 21303-GJ-803.7-D Deputy General Secretary 
GBGM 21304-GJ-805.2-D Basic Membership 
GBGM 21305-GJ-915.4-D Advance Specials 
GBGM 21306-GJ-915.5-D Promotion of Advance Specials and One Great 

Hour of Sharing 
GBGM 2I307-GJ-10O7.5-D Administering Agency 
GBGM 21308-GM-634.4-D Meetings and Elections 
GBGM 21309-GM-731.4-D Responsibilities of the Conference Board of 

Global Ministries 
GBGM 21310-GM-731.4-D Responsibilities of the Conference Board of 

Global Ministries 
GBGM 213U-GM-743.6-D United Methodist Women 
GBGM 21312-GM-1405-D Authority of Divisions and Departments 
GBGM 21313-GM-1406.1-D Incorporation 
GBGM 21314-GM-1406.3-D Incorporation of the General Board of Global 

Ministries 
GBGM 21315-GM-1406.4-D Corporation within the Board 
GBGM 21316-GM-1407-D Executive Committee 
GBGM 21317-GM-1408.1-D Board Officers 
GBGM 21318-GM-1408.2-D Division and Department Officers 
GBGM 21319-GM-1409-D Elected Staff 
GBGM 21320-GM-1410.1D Selection of the Staff 
GBGM 21321-GM-1410.2-D Staff Participation of Women 
GBGM 21322-GM-1411.I-D Appropriation of Funds 
GBGM 21323<;M14U.2D Former Mission Agencies 



GBGM 21324-GM-1411.4-D Preparation of I 

GBGM 21325-GM-1412-D Membership of the General Board of Global Min- 

isones 
GBGM 2132&GM-1412.1-D Membership of the General Board of Global 

Minlstiics 
GBGM 21327-GM-14I2.2-D TheWomen'sDIvislonMembershlpontheGen- 

eral Board of Global Ministiies 
GBGM 21328-GM-1412.3-D The Composition of the General Board of Global 

Mmisu-ies 
GBGM 21329-GM-1412.6-D Membership of the General Board of Global 

Mlnisti-les fi'om the Council of Bishops 
GBGM 2133(K;M-1412.7-D Membership of the General Board of Global 

Ministiies 
GBGM 21331-GM-1413-D National Division 
GBGM 21332-GM-1418.2-D The Office of Deaconess 
GBGM 21333-GM-1420.2-D The Committee on Deaconess Service 
GBGM 21334-GM-1421.2-D The Deaconess Program Office 
GBGM 21335-GM-1425-D Organization of The Women's Division 
GBGM 2I336-GM-1429-D Membership of the Women's Division 
GBGM 21337-GM-1431D The World Division 
GBGM 21338-HE-1531-D Schools of Theology 
GBGM 21339-MN-443.1-D Categories of Appointinent 
GBGM 2134aMN-516.3-D Working with Ordained and Diaconal Ministers 

and Commissioned Personnel 
GBGM 21341-CO-664.3-D EstabUshment and Adminisb-ation of a Mission 
GBGM 21342-GM-NonDisOS Special Program on Substance Abuse and Re- 
lated Violence 
GBGM 21343-GM-NonDis-OS National Plan for Hispanic Ministiy 
GBGM 21344-GM-NonDis-OS Asian-American Language MinisOy Shidy 
GBGM 21345-GM-NonDls-OS Native American Comprehensive Plan 
GBGM 21346-GM-NonDis-OS National Committee on Deaf Ministiies 
GBGM 21348-GM-R2(X>U The Church and People with Mental, Physical, 

and/ or Psychological Disabilities 
GBGM 21349-GM-R207-U Communications Access for People Who Have 

Hearing and Sight Impairment 
GBGM 21350-GM-R208-U Compliance with the American with Disabilities 

Act for Employers 
GBGM 21351-IC-R248-U Global Racism: A Violation of Human Rights 
GBGM 21352-GM-R484-U The Church in a Mass Media Culhire 
GBGM 21353-GM-R507-U Immigrants and Refugees: To Love the Sojourner 
GBGM 21354-GM-R557-U God's Shalom for the People of Central America 
GBGM 21355-GMR634-U Recognition of Cuba 
GBGM 21356-GM-NonDls-O National Comprehensive Plan for Town and 

Countiy 
GBGM 21357-GM-NonDis-O Afiica Reconstruction and Devetopment 
GBGM 21358-GM-NonDls-O Rape in Times of Conflict and War 
GBGM 21359-GM-NonDls-O EastTutior 
GBGM 21360-GMNonDls-O The Middle East and North Afiica 
GBGM 21362-GMNonDis-O Holy Boldness: A National Plan for Urban Min- 

\stry 
GBGM 21363-GM-NonDls-O Communities of Shalom 
GBGM 21364-CS-R504-U Gun Violence in the U.S. 

GBHEM, GBPHB 2n72-MN417-D Continuation In Probationary Mem- 
bership 
GBHEM, GBPHB 21192-MN-J41-D Support for Ordained Ministers 
GBHEM, GBPHB 21246-MN^58-D Readmission after Termination by Ac- 
tion of die Annual Conference 
GBHEM 21127-CO-3&C Amend The Constitution of The United Methodist 

Church 
GBHEM 21128-HE-NonDls-O Education: The Gift of Hope 
GBHEM 2U29-H&NonDls-0 United Methodist-Related Precollegiate 

Schools 
GBHEM 2113(>LC-270.2-D Committee on Pastor-Parish Relations 
GBHEM 21131-LC-270.2-D DutiesofthePastoral Advisory Committee 
GBHEM 2U32-LC-270.2-D Pastoral Advisory Committee 
GBHEM 21133-LC-270.2-D Pastoral Advisory Committee 
GBHEM 21134-MN-304-D Candidacy for Diaconal Ministry 
GBHEM 21135-MN-304-D Candidacy for Diaconal Ministry 
GBHEM 21136-MN-304.5-D Diaconal Ministry 
GBHEM 2U37-MN-305.3-D Continuation of Candidacy 
GBHEM 21138-MN-306-D Completion of Candidacy 



April 16, 1996 



49 



GBHEM 21139-MN-306.2-D Completion of Candidacy 

GBHEM 21UOMN-306.3-D Educational Requirements for Candidacy 

GBHEM 21141-MN-306.3-D Educational Requirements 

GBHEM 21142MN-306.3-D Educational Requirements 

GBHEM 21143-MN-307D Consecration of Diaconal Ministers 

GBHEM 21144-MN-309-D Rightsof Diaconal Ministers 

GBHEM 21145-MN-310.1-D Service Appointtnents of Diaconal Ministers 

GBHEM 21146-MN-310.3-D Service Appointiiients of Diaconal Ministers 

GBHEM 2U47-MN-311-D Credentials and Records 

GBHEM 2U48-MN-312-D Transfer of Diaconal Ministers 

GBHEM 21149-MN-313.1-D Change in Conference Relationship 

GBHEM 21150-MN-313.1-D Maternity /Paternity Leave 

GBHEM 21151-MN-313.2-D Retired Diaconal Ministers 

GBHEM 21152-MN-313.3-D Termination of Conference Relationship 

GBHEM 21153-MN-313.3-D Change in Conference Relationship 

GBHEM 21154-MN-313.4D Grievance Procedures 

GBHEM 21155-MN-315-D Relationship to the Employing Agency 

GBHEM 2U56-MN-318^D Relationship to the Charge Conference 

GBHEM 21157-MN-319-D Continue Renewal and Spiritual Growth 

GBHEM 21158-MN-402.2-D Human SexuaUty 

GBHEM 21159-MN-406.1-D Authority and Duties 

GBHEM 2n60-MN-406.6-D The Membership of Local I'astors in Annual 

Conference 

GBHEM 21161-MN-406.7-D Church Membership of Part-Time Local Pas- 

GBHEM 21162-MN-t07.6-D Ucense as a Local Pastor 

GBHEM 21163-MN-408.1-D Full-Tune Local Pastor 

GBHEM 21164-MN-409.1-D Continuance as a I^cal Pastor 

GBHEM 21165-MN-409.3-D Educational Requirements for a Full-Tmie Lo- 
cal Pastor 

GBHEM 21166-MN-409.4-D Continuance as a Local Pastor 

GBHEM 21167-MN-409.6-D Continuance as a Local Pastor 

GBHEM 21168-MN-410.5-D Retirement of Local Pastors 

GBHEM 21169-MN-412.1-D General Provisions 

GBHEM 2n70-MN-413.4-D Eligibility and Rights of Probationary Members 

GBHEM 21171-MN-414-D Qualifications for Election to Probationary Mem- 
bership 

GBHEM 2n73-MN-419-D Eligibility and Rightsof Associate Members 

GBHEM 21174-MN-419.4-D Eligibility and Rightsof Associate Members 

GBHEM 21175-MN-421-D Progression into Probationary, Full and Associ- 
ate Membership 

GBHEM 21176-MN-422-D Members in Full Connection 

GBHEM 21177-MN-423.1-D Rights and Reponsibilities of Clergy Members 

GBHEM 21178-MN-423.2-D Professional Responsibilities of Clergy Mem- 
bers 

GBHEM 21179-MN-423.2-D Rights and Responsibilities of Pastors 

GBHEM 2118aMN-424-D Requirements for Admission 

GBHEM 21181-MN-424-D Requirements for Admission 

GBHEM 21182-MN-426-D Appointinents 

GBHEM 21183-MN-426.2-D Ministers fi-om other Denominations 

GBHEM 21184-MN427.1-D Transfer from other Annual Conferences 

GBHEM 2n85-MN-432-D The Act of Ordination 

GBHEM 21186-MN-436-D General Provisions 

GBHEM 2n87-MN-437-D The Itinerant System 

GBHEM 21188-MN-437.2-D Less than Full-Time Service 

GBHEM 21189-MN-438-D Definition of a Pastor 

GBHEM 2119aMN-439.1D Reponsibilities and Duties of a Pastor 

GBHEM 2119I-MN-440.5-D Special Provisions 

GBHEM 2U93-MN-442-D Appoinbnent Beyond the Local United Methodist 

Church 

GBHEM 2U94-MN-442.3-D Ap|)ointiiienl Beyond the I-ocal United Method- 
ist Church 

GBHEM 21195-MN-443-D Clergy in Appointment Beyond the Local Church 

GBHEM 21196-MN-443.1-D Categories of ApiKiintinents 

GBHEM 21197-MN-443.1-D Categories of Apiwintiiients 

GBHEM 21198-MN-443.1-D Categories of Ap|)ointments 

GBHEM 21199-MN-443.2-D Conference Members are Amenable to the An 

nual Conference 

GBHEM 2120O-MN-443.2-D Responsibility of an Annual Conference 



GBHEM 21201-MN-443.3-D ReUtion to the Local Church 
GBHEM 21202-MN-443.3-D Affiliate Relations to a Local Church 
GBHEM 21203-MN-443.4-D Affiliate Relations to Annual Conference 



GBHEM 21205-MN-444-D The Process of Evaluation 

GBHEM 21206-MN-445-D Continuating Education and Spiritual Growth 

GBHEM 21207-MN-446-D Sabbatical Leave 

GBHEM 21208-MN-447-D Change of Conference Relationship 

GBHEM 21209-MN.448.1-D Leave of Absence 

GBHEM 21210-MN-448.1-D Voluntary Leave of Absence 

GBHEM 212U-MN-448.1-D Involuntay l>eave of Absence 

GBHEM 2I212-MN-448.4-D Leave of Absence 

GBHEM 21213-MN-448.2-D Ix-ave of Absence 

GBHEM 21214-MN-448.3-D Voluntary Leave of Absence 

GBHEM 21215-MN-448.4-D Leave of Absence 

GBHEM 21216-MN-)48.5-D Leave of Absence 

GBHEM 21217-MN-448.6-D Effective Date of Process 

GBHEM 21218-MN-449.1-D Family Leave 

GBHEM 21219-MN-449.4-D Extension of Family Leave 

GBHEM 21220-MN-450-D Maternity/Paternity Uave 

GBHEM 21221-MN-451.1-D Disability Leave 

GBHEM 21222-MN-451.2-D Disability Leave 

GBHEM 21223-MN-451.3-D Medical Evidence for DisabiUty Leave 

GBHEM 21224-MN-452.3-D Involuntiiry Retirement 

GBHEM 2122S-MN-453.1-D Honorable Location 

GBHEM 21226-MN-453.1-D Location Certified by Presiding Bishop 

GBHEM 21227-MN-453.2-D Withdrawal to Unite with Another Denomina- 
tion 

GBHEM 21228-MN-453.3-D Surrender of the Ordained Ministerial Office 

GBHEM 21229-MN-453.4-D Withdrawal under Complaints or Charges 

GBHEM 21230-MN-453.5-D Withdrawal between Conferences 

GBHEM 21231-MN-454-D Grievance Procedures 

GBHEM 21232-MN-454.1-D Supervision of Clergy 

GBHEM 21233-MN-454.1-D Complaints and Suspension 

GBHEM 21234-MN-454.1-D Supervisory Response 

GBHEM 21235-MN-454.1-D Disposition of Complaints 

GBHEM 21236-MN-454.1-D Referral of Complaints 

GBHEM 21237-MN-454.2-D Fair Process in Administi-ative Hearings 

GBHEM 21238-MN-454.3-D Administrative Complaints 

GBHEM 21239-MN-454.3-D Recommendation to Administi-ative Location 

GBHEM 21240-MN-454.3-D The Administrative Review Committee 

GBHEM 21241-MN-454.3-D Recommendation to Terminate Membership 

GBHEM 21242-MN-454.4-D Grievance Procedures 

GBHEM 21243-MN 455-D Readmission to Probationary Membership 

GBHEM 21244-MN-456-D Readmission after Honorable or Administrative 

l-ocation 

GBHEM 21245-MN-457-D Readmission after Surrender of the Ministerial 

Office 

GBHEM 21247-CO-702-D Composition and Character of the Annual Confer- 
ence 

GBHEM 21248X:O-704.4-D Powers and Duties of the Annual Conference 

GBHEM 21249<;O-704.7-D Powers and Duties of Uie Annual Conference 

GBHEM 2125aDM217.9-D Leadership and Ministi7 Development Respon- 
sibilities 

GBHEM 21251-FA-725-D Required Information fi-om Clergy Members Ap- 
pointed Beyond the Local Church 

GBHEM 21252-MN^54-D Changes of Conference Relationship 

GBHEM 21253-MN-459.3-D Readmission after Temtination by Action of the 

Annual Conference 

GBHEM 2I254-MN-508-D Vacancy in the Office of Bishop 

GBHEM 21255-MN-509.1-D Mandatory Retirement 

GBHEM 21256-MN-510-D SUitusof Retired Bishop 

GBHEM 2I257-MN-5U-D U-aves 

GBHEM 21258-MN-513-D Complaints Against Bishops 

GBHEM 21259-MN-733-D Administttitive Review Committee 

GBHEM 21260-MN-733.1-D T.-nns n( M,-mli,i -i n( ih.- Cnnlr, ,■„.■,• Hoard of 
Ordained Ministry 



Daily Edition Vol. 5 No. 1 



GBHEM 21261-MN-733.1-D Membership of the Conference Fioard of Or- 
dained Ministry 
GBHEM 21262-GJ-1006.13-D ResponsibiUties of the General Council on 



GBHEM 21263-MN-2618-D The Judicial Council 

GBHEM 21264-MN-2622-D Investigations. Trials, and Appeals 

GBHEM 21265-MN-2622-D Fair Process 

GBHEM 21266-MN-2622.7-D Diversity of the United Methodist Church on 
Boards, Committees and Courts of the UMC 

GBHEM 21267-MN-2623-D Chargeable Offenses 

GBHEM 21268-MN-2624-D Charges 

GBHEM 21269-MN-2625-D Committee on InvesUgaUon 

GBHEM 2I270-MN-2626-D Trial Procedures 

GBHEM 21271-HE-732.4-D Responsibilities with Campus Ministries 

GBHEM 21272-GM-1432.5-D Assignment of Ordained Clergy from Nations 
other than the United States Serving as Missionaries 

GBHEM 21273-H&1505,3-D Objectives of the General Board of Higher Edu- 
cation and Ministry 

GBHEM 21274-HE-1511.1-D The Division of Chaplains and Related Minis- 



GBHEM 21275-HE-1511.2-D Endorsement of Ordained I 

GBHEM 21276-H&1S11.2-D General Oversight for Clergy Members 

GBHEM 21277-HE-1511.2-D Standards for Endorsements for Ministry Set- 
tings 

GBHEM 21278-HE-1514.4-D Provisions regarding inquiries of United Meth- 
odist Related Schools, Colleges and Universities 

GBHEM 21279-HE-1532-D Selection and Education of Candidates for Ad- 
mission to the Annual Conference 

GBHEM 21280-HE-NonDis-O$ Historically Black CoUeges and Universities 
Related to The UMC and the Black College Fund 

GBHEM 21281-MN-516.7-D Working with Ordained and Diaconal Ministers 
and Commissioned Persons 

GBHEM 21282-MN-519-D Specific Responsibilities of District Superinten- 
dents 

GBHEM 21283-MN-522-D Spiritual and Pastoral Leadership 

GBHEM 21284-MN-523.4-D Adminish-ation 

GBHEM 21285-MN-530.1-D Responsibility 

GBHEM 21286-MN-533.r,-D The Process of Appointment Making 

GBHEM 21287-MN-734.1-D Conference Board of Diaconal Ministry 

GBHEM 21288-MN-734.4D DuUes of the Conference Board of Diaconal 
Ministry for Certification 

GBHEM 21289-MN-734.4-D Requirements for Certification of tiie Confer- 
ence Board of Diaconal Ministi7 

GBHEM 21290-MN-734.4-D Certification Requirement for flie Conference 
Board of Diaconal Ministry 

GBHEM 21291-MN-1526.2-D ResponsibiUties of the Division of Diaconal 
Ministi-y 

GBHEM 21292-MN-1527.2-D Responsibilities ofthe Board of Ordained Min- 
istry 

GBHEM 21293-MN-1527.3-D Enlisting and Suppoiting the Effective Minis- 
try of Women 

GBHEM 21294-MN-1529.7-D Specific ResponsibiUties of the Division of Or- 
dained Minisb7 

GBHEM 21295-MN-1529.14-D ResponsibiUties of tiie Division of Ordained 
Ministi-y 

GBOD, NYMO Steering Committee 21419-D1-1307-D National Youth 
Ministry Organization Steering Committee 

GBOD, NYMO, IVfYMO Steering Committee 21383-DI-632-D Jurisdic- 
tional Youtii Ministry Organization Convocation 

GBOD 21382-DI-282-D Functionsand AccountabiUty of aLay Missioner 

GBOD 21384-DI-632-D Jurisdictional Youth Minisby Organization Convoca- 



GBOD 21385-DI-729.1-D General ResponsibiUties 

GBOD 21386-DI-729.1-D General ResponsibiUties 

GBOD 21387-DI-729.1-D General ResponsibiUties 

GBOD 21388-DI-729.2-D ResponsibiUties in the Area of Christian Education 

and Age Level Ministries 

GBOD 21389-DI-729.3-D ResponsibiUties in the Area of EvangcUsm 

GBOD 21390-DI-729.4-D ResponsibiUties in the Area of Worship 

GBOD 21391-DI-729.6-D ResponsibiUties in tlie Area of Spiritual Formation 

GBOD 21392-DI-729.6-D ResponsibiUties in the Area of Spiritual Formation 

GBOD 21393-D1-729.6-D ResponsibiUties in the Area of Devotional Ufe 



GBOD 21394-DI-730.1-D Conference Board of Laity 

GBOD 21395-DI-757-D Distiict Board of Laity 

GBOD 2I396-DI-757.2-D Disti-ict Board of Laity 

GBOD 21397-D1-1201-D Purpose of the General Board of Discipleship 

GBOD 21398-DI-1202-D ResponsibiUties of die General Board of Disci 

pleship 

GBOD 21399-DI-1204-D Organization 

GBOD 2140O-DM2O7-D Christian Education and Age-Level Ministiies 

GBOD 21401-DI-1208-D Education ResponsibiUties and Standards 

GBOD 21402-DI-1208.1-D Education ResponsibiUties 

GBOD 21403-DH209-D Educational Standards 

GBOD 21404-DI-1210-D Cooperation 

GBOD 21405-DI-1211-D EvangeUsm 

GBOD 21406-DI-1212-D EvangeUsm ResponsibiUties 

GBOD 21407-DI-1213-D Worship ResponsibiUties 

GBOD 21408-DI-1216-D Ministiy ofthe Laity 

GBOD 21409-D1-1218-D Christian Discipleship Formation ResponsibiUties 

GBOD 21410-DI-1219-D Age-Level and Family Ministiies 

GBOD 21411-DI-1219-D Ethnic Local Church Concerns 

GBOD 21412-DI-1220-D Committee on Family Life 

GBOD 21413-DH222-D Comprehensive Youth Ministiy 

GBOD 21414-DI-1224.2-D Curriculum Resources Committee 

GBOD 21415-DI-1304-D Stiucture ofthe National Youtii MinisUyOrganiza- 

GBOD 21416-DI-1305-D National Youth Ministiy Organization Convocation 
GBOD 21417-DI-1306.1-D National Youth Ministiy Organization Legislative 

Assembly 
GBOD 21418-D1-1306.2-D Voting Members of the National Youth Ministry 

Organization Legislative Assembly 
GBOD 21420-DI-1307.1-D Membership of the National Youth Ministiy Or- 
ganization Steering Committee 
GBOD 21421-DI-1308-D Staff of the National Youth Ministiy Organization 
GBOD 21422-FA-1606.3-D Powers, Duties, and ResponsibiUties of the An- 
nual Conference 

GBOD 21423-GJ-810.1-D Provisions Pertaining to General Agency Member- 
ship 

GBOD 21424-MN-2626.4-D Trial of Lay Member of a Local Church 

GBOD 21425-LC-105-D Tlie General Ministiy of aU Christian Believers 

GBOD 21426-LC-208-D Church Membership 

GBOD 21427-LC-209-D Membership of a Local United Methodist Church 

GBOD 21428-LC-210-D Church Membership 

GBOD 21429-LC-211-D The Meaning of Membership 

GBOD 21430-LC-216-D Admission into die Church 

GBOD 21431-LC-217-D Duties of Chaplains in Receiving Persons as Mem- 
bers of the United Methodist Church 

GBOD 21432-LC-220-D Admission into the Church 

GBOD 21433-LC-221-D Care of Children and Youth 

GBOD 21434-LC-222-D Care of Members 

GBOD 21435-LC-223-D Care of Members 

GBOD 21436-LC-224-D Care of Members 

GBOD 21437-LC-225-D Care of Members 

GBOD 21438-LC-226-D Care of Members 

GBOD 21439-LC-227-D AffiUate and Associate Members 

GBOD 21440-LC-229-D Care of Professing Members 

GBOD 21441-LC-230-D Care of Members 

GBOD 21442-LC-230-D Care of Members 

(;B0D 21443-LC-232-D Local Church Membership Rolls 

GBOD 21444-LC-232-D Membership Records and Reports 

GBOD 21445-LC-243-D Membership Rolls 

GBOD 21446-LC-243-D Transfer and Termination of Membership 

GBOD 21447-LC-244-D Organization and Administi-ation of the Local 
Church 

GBOD 21448-LC-252.1-D ResponsibiUties of the Local Church Lay Leader 

GBOD 21449-LC-262.5-D The Work Area Chairperson of EvangeUsm 

GBOD 2145O-LC-262.10-D The Work Area Chairperson of Stewardship 

GBOD 21451-LC-264.1-D The Church School 

GBOD 21452-LC-266.4-D Family Ufe Council 

GBOD 21453-LC-270.1-D Committee on Nominations and Personnel 

GBOD 21454-LC-270.2-D The Committee on Pastor-Parish Relations 



April 16, 1996 



GBOD 21455-U;-270.4-D Committee on Finance 
GBOD 21456-MN-404.3-D Candidacy for Ordained Ministry 
GBOD 21457-MN-439.1-D Responsibilities and Duties of a Pastor 
GBOD 21458-MN439.1D Responsibilities and Duties of a Pastor 
GBOD 21459-MN-439.3-D Responsibilities and Duties of a Pastor 
GBOD 21460-MN-440.1-D Special Provisions 
GBOD 21461-MN-443.1-D Categories of Appointment 
GBOD 21462-MN-523-D Specific Responsibilities of District Superinten- 
dents 
GBOD 21463-MN-1526.12-D Responsibilities of the Division of Diaconal 

Ministry 
GBOD 21464-DI-NonDis-O By Water and The Spirit: A United Methodist 

Understanding of Baptism 
GBOD 21465-DI-NonDis-O Adoption of the Spanish Language Hymnal, Mil 

Voces Para Celebrar 
GBOD 21468-CS-R377-U Suicide: A Challenge to Ministry 
GBOD 21469-DI-R249-U Enlist and Involve the Youth in the life of the 

Church 
GBOD 21471-DI-R246-U Education on Alcohol and Substance Abuse 
GBOD 21517-LC-228.1-D To Affirm the Task of Continuous Nurture of Chil- 
dren 
GBOD 22822-DI-NonDis-O Support for the Approval of "By Water and the 

Spirit" 
GBPB 20773-FA-NonDis-O Change Name of General Board of Publication 
GBPB 20774-FA- 1702-D Reduction in size of the General Board of Publica- 
tion 
GBPB 20775-FA-1706-D Reduction in size of the Executive Committee of the 

General Board of Publication 
GBPB 20776-FA-1707-D Reduction in the number of members required to 

call a meeting of the Executive Committee 
GBPHB 21481-FA-1601-D Name 
GBPHB 21482-FA-1602-D Membership 
GBPHB 21483-FA-1603-D Legal Entities 
GBPHB 21484-FA-1604-D Authorizations 
GBPHB 21485-FA-1605-D Permanent Funds 
GBPHB 21486-FA-1606.1-D Powers, Duties, and Responsibilities 
GBPHB 21487-MN449-D Family Leave 
GBPHB 21488-MN-452-D Retirement of Clergy Members 
GBPHB 21489-GJ-814.3-D Provisions Pertaining to Staff 
GBPHB '21490-GJ-814.5-D Provisions Pertaining to Stiiff 
GBPHB 21491-MN410.5-D Retirement of Local Pastor 
GBPHB 21492-MN-443.1-D Categories of Appointinent 
GBPHB 21493-FA-NonDis-O Basic Protection Plan 
GBPHB 21494-FA-NonDis-O Comprehensive Protection Plan 
GBPHB 21495-FA-NonDis-O Cumulative Pension and Benefit Fund 
GBPHB 21496-FA-NonDis-O Cumulative Pension and Benefit Fund-§ 5.13 
GBPHB 21497-FA-NonDis-O Cumulative Pension and Benefit Fund-S 6 04 
GBPHB 21498-FA-NonDis-O Cumulative Pension and Benefit Fund-§ 12.09 
GBPHB 21499-FA-NonDis-O Ministerial Pension Plan 
GBPHB 21500-FA-NonDis-O Ministerial Pension Plan-§ 2.12 
GBPHB 21501-FA-NonDis-O Ministerial Pension PIan-§ 5.13 
GBPHB 21502-FA-NonDis-O Ministerial Pension Plan-§ 6.04 
GBPHB 21503-FA-NonDis-O Personal Investtnent Plan 
GBPHB 21504-FA-NonDis-O Staff Retirement Benefits Program 
GBPHB 21505-FA-NonDis-O Staff Retirement Benefits Program, Supple- 
ment One 
GBPHB 21506-FA-NonDis-O Staff Retirement Benefits Program-Supple- 
ment One 
GBPHB 21507-FA-NonDis-O Staff Retirement Benefits Program-§ 2.07 
GBPHB 21508-FA-NonDis-O Staff Retirement Benefits ProgTam-§ 5.04 
GBPHB 21509-FA-NonDis-O Staff Retirement Benefits Program-§ 5 05 
GBPHB 21510-FA-NonDis-O Staff Retirement Benefits Program-§ 5.13 
GBPHB 21511-FA-NonDis-O Staff Retirement Benefits Program-§ 6.04 
GBPHB 21512-FA-NonDis-O Report Three: Petitions Referred By The 1992 

General Conference 
GCAH 20764-lC-NonDis-O Recommendation of new Heritage Landmark 
GCAH 20765-IC-1803-D Purpose of the Genera! Commission on Archives 

and History 
GCAH 20766-IC-1804.2-D Membership of the General Commission on Ar- 
chives and History 



GCAH 20767-1C-1808-D Executive Committee 
GCAH 20768-IC-1811.3-D Procedures 

GCAH 20769-1C-1812. 1-D Historic Sites, Historic Shrines, and Historic Land- 
marks 
GCAH 20770-IC-1812.2-D Present Historic Shrines 
GCAH 20771-IC-1812.3-D Present Historic Landmarks 
GCCUIC, Council of Bishops 21075-IC-2405.1-D Liaison Role of the Coun- 
cil of Bishops 
GCCUIC, GBOD 21055-DI-NonDis-O SupportfortheApprovalof"ByWater 

and the Spirit" 
GCCUIC, NIL, Council of Bishops, PED 20970-lC-NonDis-O Proposal 

for tiie Adoption of Church in Covenant Communion 
GCCUIC, NIL 21071-IC-2402-D Councils and Consultations of Churches 
GCCUIC, NIL 21072-IC-2402.1-D The Consultation on Church Union 
GCCUIC, NIL 21073-1C-2402.1-D The Consultation on Church Union 
GCCUIC 21053-CO-12.3-C United Methodist Delegates to Other Confer- 
ences 
GCCUIC 21054-DI-68-D Ecumenical Commitinent 

GCCUIC 21056-D1-R245-U Ecumenical Interpretations of Doctiinal Stand- 
ards 
GCCUIC 21057-FA-2520.1-D Local Church Building Sites and Plans 
GCCUIC 21058-GM-731.5-D TheAnnual Conference Board of Global Minis- 

tiies 
GCCUIC 21059-GJ-805.2-D Other Membership 
GCCUIC 21060-GJ-808.1-D Board Organization 
GCCUIC 21061-GJ-814.7-D Provisions pertaining to Staff 
GCCUIC 21067-IC-2003.5-D Responsibifities of the General Commission on 

Christian Unity and Interreligious Concerns 
GCCUIC 21068-IC-2003.6-D Responsibilities of the General Commission on 

Christian Unity and Interreligious Concerns 
GCCUIC 21069-1C-2003.10-D Responsibilities of the General Conmiission on 

Christian Unity and Interreligious Concerns 
GCCUIC 21070-IC-2006.1-D Composition of the General Commission on 

Christian Unity and Interreligious Concerns 
GCCUIC 21074-IC-2402.2-D Representatives to the National Council of the 

Council of the Church of Christ Governing Board 
GCCUIC 21076-1C-R217-U Continuing Membership in the National Council 

of Churches 
GCCUIC 21077-IC-R218-U Continuing Membership in the World Council of 

Churches 
GCCUIC 21079-IC-NonDis-O AffirmationofSupportfortheEcumenicalDec- 

ade of tile Churches in Solidarity witii Women 
GCCUIC 21080-lC-NonDis-O Building Bridges in Hope, Statement of The 

United Methodist Church on Christian-Jewish Relations 
GCCUIC 21081-LC-lOl-D The Churches 
GCCUIC 21082-LC-206.3-D Ecumenical Parish 
GCCUIC 21083-LC-207-D Ecumenical Shared Ministties 
GCCUIC 21084-LC-210-D Church Membership 
GCCUIC 21085-LC-227-D AffiUate and Associate Membership 
GCCUIC 21086-LC-232.7-D Membership Records and Reports 
GCCUIC 21087-LC-242-D Membership Records 
GCCUIC 21088-LC-252.2-D Lay Members of the Annual Conference 
GCCUIC 21089-LC-257.7-D Responsibifity of the Administrative Board 
GCCUIC 21090-LC-2544-D Planning and Financial Requirements for Local 

Church Buildings 
GCCUIC 21091-LC-2545-D Conservation and Dedication of Local Church 

Buildings 
GCCUIC 21092-LC-2548.1-D Deeding Church Property to Federated, Union, 

or Merged Churches 
GCCUIC 21093-LC-2548.2-D Deeding Church Property to Federated 

Churches or Other Evangelical Denominations 
GCCUIC 21094-LC-2551-D Local Church Potential 
GCCUIC 21095-LC-2553.2-D Shared Facilities with anoUicr Denomination 
GCCUIC 21096-LC-2553.2-D Property Agieement in a Shared Facility 
GCCUIC 21097-MN-108-D Representative Ministiy 
GCCUIC 21098-MN-426.2-D Ministers fi-om other Denominations 
GCCUIC 21099-MN-438-D Local Church Appointinents 
GCCUIC 21100-MN-439-D Responsibilities and Duties of a Pastor 
GCCUIC 21101MN-441-D United Metiiodlst Ordained Clergy in Ecumeni- 
cal Appointinents 
GCCUIC 21102-MN-442.1-D Appointment Beyond the Local Church 



52 



Daily Edition Vol. 5 No. 1 



GCCUIC 21103-MN-443-D Clergy in Appointment Beyond the Local United 

Methodist Church 
GCCUIC 21104-MN-443.1-D Appointments within the Connectional Struc- 
tures of United Methodism 
GCCUIC 21105-M N-443. ID Appointments to Ministries in Ecumenical Set- 
tings 
GCCUIC 21106-MN-443.4-D Special Ecumenical Affiliation 
GCCUIC 21107-MN-519-D Specific Responsibilities of District Superinten- 
dents 
GCCUIC 21108-MN-524.2-D Program Responsibilities of the District Super- 
intendent 
GCCUIC 21109-MN-529.6-D The Cabinet's Responsibibty in United Method- 
ist presence in Ecumenical Shared Ministries 
GCCUIC 21 1 10-M N-530. 1-D Responsibility in Appointment Making 
GCFA, GCOM 21559-FA-709.2-D Membership of the Annual Conference 

Council on Finance and Administration 
GCFA, GCOM 21562-FA-711-D Budgets 
GCFA, GCOM 21563-FA-7U.5-D Budget Revisions 
GCFA, GCOM 21566-FA-722.8-D Equitable Compensation 
GCFA, GCOM 21567-FA-722.11-D Equitable Compensation 
GCFA, GCOM 21569-FA-905.1-D OrganizaUon 
GCFA, GCOM 21576-FA-906.10-D Fiscal ResponsibiUties 
GCFA, GCOM 21593-GJ-816-D Policies Relative to Socially Responsible In- 



GCFA, GCOM 21594-GJ-821-D Meetings 

GCFA 21111-FA-NonDis-O World Service Fund 

GCFA 21112-FA-NonDis-O Ministerial Education Fund 

GCFA 21113-FA-NonDis-O Black College Fund 

GCFA 21114-FA-NonDis-O Africa University Fund 

GCFA 21115-FA-NonDis-O Episcopal Fund 

GCFA 21116-FA-NonDis-O General Administration Fund 

GCFA 21117-FA-NonDis-O Interdenominational Cooperation Fund 

GCFA 21118-FA-NonDis-O Apportionment Formulas 

GCFA 21119-FA-NonDis-O Special Sundays With Offerings 

GCFA 21120-FA-NonDis-O Directives for the Administration of the General 

Funds 
GCFA 21121-FA-NonDis-O References from Previous General Conferences 
GCFA 21122-FA-NonDis-O Budget of the General Council on Finance and 

Administration 
GCFA 21123-FA-NonDis-O Other Reports and Recommendations 
GCFA 21124-FA-NonDis-O Reports and Recommendations presented With 

Other General Agencies 
GCFA 21558-CO-608.4-D Petitions to General Conference 
GCFA 2156O-FA-710.1-D Responsibilities of the Annual Conference Council 

on Finance and Administration 
GCFA 21561-FA-710.7-D Relationships 

GCFA 21564-FA-714.2-D Authority and Responsibility of the Annual Confer- 
ence Council on Finance and Administration 
GCFA 21565-FA-716.1-D Conference Treasurer/Director of Administrative 

Services 
GCFA 21568-FA-724-D Pastors' Expenses and Allowances 
GCFA 21570-FA-905.4-D Committee on Audit and Review 
GCFA 21571-FA-905.5-D Staff 
GCFA 21572-FA-906.3-D Fiscal Responsibilities 
GCFA 21573-FA-906.4-D Fiscal Responsibilities 
GCFA 21574-FA-906.5-D Fiscal Responsibilities 
GCFA 21575-FA-906.6-D Fiscal Responsibilities 
GCFA 21577-FA-907-D Other Administrative Responsibilities 
GCFA 21578-FA-907.7-D Other Administrative Responsibilities 
GCFA 21579-FA-907.8-D Other Administrative Responsibilities 
GCFA 21580-FA-907.13-D Other Administrative Responsibilities 
GCFA 21581-FA-907.14-D Other Administrative Responsibilities 
GCFA 21582-FA-907.15-D Other Administrative Responsibilities 
GCFA 21583-FA-909-D Responsibilities of the Treasurer 
GCFA 21584-FA-910-D Definition of "General Funds" 
GCFA 21585-FA-911.1-D General Policies 
GCFA 21586-FA-911.2-D General Policies 
GCFA 21587FA-911.3-D General Policies 
GCFA 21589-FA-2503-D Tnist Clauses in Deeds 
GCFA 21590-FA-2503.5-D Trust Clauses in Deeds 



GCFA 21591-FA-2512-D The Methodist Corporation 

GCFA 21592-GJ-814.3-D Provisions Pertaining to Staff 

GCFA 21595-LC-114-D Employment Status of Clergy 

GCFA 21596-LC-262.10-D The Chairperson of Stewardship 

GCFA 21597-IjC-2525-D Local Church Board of Trustees— Qualifications 

GCFA 21598-LC-2533.1-D Board of Trustees-Powers and Limitations 

GCFA 21599-LC-2534-D Planned Giving and Endowments Committee 

GCFA 2160O-LC-2534.4-D Permanent Endowment Fund Committee 

GCFA 21601-LC-2534-D Resources 

GCFA 21602-GJ-513.5-D Complaints 

GCFA 21603-MN-523.5-D Administration 

GCOM 21609-CO-602-D Composition of The General Conference 

GCOM 21610-CO-604 1-D Election of Secretary-Designate 

GCOM 21611-CO-605-D Responsibilities of the Secretary-Designate 

GCOM 21612-CO-608.2-D Petitions to General Conference 

GCOM 21613-CO-612-D Interjurisdictional Committee on Episcopacy 

GCOM 21614-CO-624-D The Jurisdictional Conference 

GCOM 21615-CO-702-D Composition and Character 

GCOM 21616-CO-705.3-D Business of the Conference 

GCOM 21617-CO-707-D Conference Agencies 

GCOM 21618-CO-726-D Annual Conference Council on Ministries 

GCOM 21619-DI-282-D Lay Missioners 

GCOM 21620-DI-729-D Conference Board of Discipleship 

GCOM 21621-DI-751.4-D Responsibility of the Distinct Lay Leader 

GCOM 21622-DI-758.2-D Disti-ict Committee on Lay Speaking 

GCOM 21623-FA-708-D Conference Council on Finance and Administration 

GCOM 21624-CO-700-D Conference Commission on Communication 

GCOM 21625-FA-716-D Conference Treasurer/Director of Administi^tive 

Services 
GCOM 21626-FA-722-D Equitable Compensation 
GCOM 21627-FA-736.2-D Episcopal Residence Committee 
GCOM 21628-FA-737-D Conference Board of Pensions 
GCOM 21629-FA-746-D Joint Committee on Disability 
GCOM 2163O-FA-1702-D Organization of the General Board of Publication 
GCOM 21631-DL730.1-D Conference Board of Laity 
GCOM 21632-CS-728.1-D Board of Church and Society 
GCOM 21633-GJ-274-D Special Sundays 
GCOM 21634-GJ-275-D General Provisions Regarding Churchwide Special 

Sundays With Offerings 
GCOM 21635-GJ-277-D Three Special Sundays 
GCOM 21636-LC-lOl-D The Churches 
GCOM 21637-LC- 102-D The Churches 
GCOM 21638-LC-103-D The Churches 

GCOM 21639-LC-105-D The General Ministry of AU Christian BeUevers 
GCOM 21640-LC-107-D The General Ministiy of All Christian Believers 
GCOM 21641-LC-112-D The Journey of a Connectional People 
GCOM 21642-LC-113-D Called to Inclusiveness 
GCOM 21643-LC-245-D Local Church Organization and Administi-ation 
GCOM 21644-LC-248-D The Local Church Historian 
GCOM 21645-MN-524-D Responsibilities of the Disbict Superintendent 
GCOM 21646-CO-NonDis-O Persons with Disabilities 
GCOM 21647-CS-1106-D Organization of the General Board of Church and 

Society 
GCOM 21648-DI-1204-D Organi2ation of the General Board of Discipleship 
GCOM 21649-GJ-748-D Annual Conference Committee on Native American 

Ministiy 
GCOM 21650-GJ-802.4-D Amenability and Program Accountability 
GCOM 21651-GJ-803-D Definitions, Structures, and Titles 
GCOM 21652-GJ-805.2-D Other Members 

GCOM 21653-MN-734.1-D Conference Board of Diaconal Ministir 
GCOM 21654-GJ-805-D General Agency Membership 
GCOM 21655-GJ-810.2-D Provisions Pertaining to General Agency Member- 
ship 
GCOM 21656-GJ-812-D Vacancies 
GCOM 21657-GJ-8I4.10-D Provisions Pertaining to Staff 
GCOM 21658-GJ-1006.6-D Responsibilities of the General Council on Minis- 
hies 
GCOM 21659-GJ-1007-D Membership of the General Council on Ministiies 
GCOM 21660-GM-731-D Conference Board of Global Ministries 



April 16, 1996 



53 



GCOM 21661-GM-1412.1-D Membership of the General Board of Global 



M 

GCOM 21662-HE-732-D Conference Board of Higher Education and Cam- 
pus Ministry 
GCOM 21663-HE-1507-D Organization of the General Board of Higher Edu- 
cation and Ministry 
GCOM 2 1664-IC-738. 1-D Conference Commission on Archives and History 
GCOM 2166SIC-739.1-D Conference Commission on Christian Unity and 

Interreligious Concerns 
GCOM 21666-IC-740.1-D Conference Commission on Religion and Race 
GCOM 2 1667-10-74 1-D Conference Commission on the Status and Role of 

Women 
GCOM 21668-1C-1907.1-D MembershipoftheGeneralCommissiononCom- 

munications 
GCOM 2 1669-IC-2006-D Membership of the General Commission on Chris- 
tian Unity and Interreligious Concerns 
GCOM 21670-IC-2103-D Membership of the Commission on Religion and 

Race 
GCOM 21671-1C-2204-D Membership of the Commission on the Stahis and 

Role of Women 
GCOM 2I672-MN-733.1-D Conference Board of Ordained Ministry 
GCOM 21675-GJ-NonDis-O GCOM Quadrennial Report 
GCOM 21676-GJ-NonDis-0$ Connectional Issues Study 
GCOM 21677-GJ-NonDis-OS Sti-engthening the Black Church 
GCOM 21678-GJ-NonDis-0$ A Shared Mission Focus 
GCOM 21679-GJ-NonDis-O Resolutions on Special Sundays 
GCOM 21680-GJ-NonDis-O Mission and Ministi^ in Alaska 
GCOM 21681-GJ-NonDis-O Prison Ministry/Prison Reform 
GCOM 21682-GJ-NonDis-O Spanish Language Resources 
GCOM 21683-GJ-NonDis-O The Book of Resolution 
GCOM 21684-GJ-NonDis-O Churches' Center for Theology and Public Pol- 
icy 
GCOM 21685-GJ-NonDis-O World Service Special Gifts Program 
GCOM 21686-GJ-NonDis-O Peace With Justice Special Program 
GCOM 21687-GJ-NonDis-O Evaluation of the General Program-Related 

Agencies. Etc. 
GCOM 21688-GJ-NonDis-O National Plan for Hispanic Ministries 
GCOM 21689-GJ-NonDis-O Ethnic Local Church Concerns Committee 
GCOM 21690-GJ-NonDis-O Advance for Christ and His Church 
GCOM 21691-GJ-NonDis-O Evaluation of GCOM 
GCOM 21692-GJ-NonDis-O Interagency Task Force on Legislation 
GCOM 21693-GJ-NonDis-O Implementation of Theme 
GCOM 21694-GJ-NonDis-O Implementation of Special Programs 
GCOM 21695-GJ-NonDis-O Process for Developing Theme. Missional Pri- 
orities & Special Programs 
GCOM 21696-GJ-NonDis-O Priority on Crisis in the Cities 
GCOM 21697-GJ-NonDis-O Reclaiming the Cities 
GCOM 21698-GJ-NonDis-O Response to Refugee Crisis 
GCOM 21699-GJ-NonDis-O Grants from the World Service Contingency 

Fund 
GCOM 21700-GJ-NonDis-O Environmental Racism 
GCOM 21701-GJ-NonDis-O Strengthening the Small Membership Church 
GCOM 21702-GJ-NonDis-O The Natural World 
GCOM 21703-GJ-NonDis-O New Developments in Genetic Science 
GCOM 2 1704-GJ-NonDis-O Developing Congregations for Deaf Ministiies 
GCOM 21705-GJ-NonDis-O Assessment of Sexual Harassment 
GCOM 21706-GJ-NonDis-O Training Events for New Distinct Superinten- 
dents and Conference Council Directors 
GCOM 21707-GJ-NonDis-O Joint Training Events 
GCOM 21708-GJ-NonDis-O Telecommunications and Centi-al Ordering 
GCOM 21709-GJ-NonDis-O Biblical & Theological Language 
GCOM 21710-GJ-NonDis-O Racial Harassment Policy 
GCOM 21711-GJ-NonDis-O Native American Center 
GCOM 21712-GJ-NonDis-O Use of Name and Insignia 
GCOM 21713-GJ-NonDis-O General Agency Headquarters/Staff Location 
GCOM 21714-GJ-NonDis-O Needs of the General Program Agencies from 

the World Service Fund 
GCOM 21715-GJ-NonDis-O GCOM Requested World Service Allocations to 

Program Agencies 
GCOM 21716<;j-NonDis-0 Mission and Aging in a Global Population 



GCORR 20964-DI-1307-D Membership of the National Youth Ministry Or- 
ganization Steering Committee 

GCORR 20966-IC-2108.2-D Responsibility of the General Commission on 
Religion and Race 

GCORR 20967-IC-2108.21-D ResponsibiUty of the General Commission on 
Religion and Race 

GCORR 20968-IC-NonDis-O 1992 General Conference Referral-Member- 
ship in Supremacist Groups 

GCORR 20969-IC-R159-U Affirmative Action 

GCORR 20971-IC-NonDis-O Racism in Rural Areas Task Force Report 

GCORR 21035-DH306.2-D Voting Membership of National Youth Ministry 
Organization Steering Committee 

GCORR 21604-1C-R248-U Elimination of Racism in The United Metiiodist 
Church 

GCORR 21605-IC-R256-U Global Racism 

GCORR 21606-1C-R346-U A Program to Emphasize Indusiveness in All Di- 
mensions of tile Church 

GCSRW 20848-CS-71-D Sexual Harassment 



GCSRW 2085(>IC-2203.7-D Advocacy role of tiie General Commission on the 

Status and Role of Women 
GCSRW 20851-MN-NonDis-O Sexual Abuse Within tiie Ministerial Relation- 
ship and Sexual Harassment Within the UM Church 
GCSRW 20852-MN-313-D Family Uave 

General Commission on Central Conference ASears, 2302SCC-NonDis-O 
Episcopal Oversight in the Commonwealth of Independent States 

General and Jurisdictional Delegation, Florida Annual Conference, 
Leesburg, FL 20733-MN-NonDis-O Mandatory Retirement Age for 
Clergy. Bishops and other Church Employees 

Genera) Commission on Central Conference Affau^ 22013-CC-NonDis-O 
Zaire to Become a Central Conference 

George R. Rhoads, Rogers, ARK 21017-LC-2539-D Incorporated Local 
Church Property • Notice and Authorization 

Gibson, James A. Ill, SGA 22332-CS-1104-D The Responsibilities of the 
General Board of Church and Society 

Gibson, James A. Ill, SGA 22333-CS1104-D The Responsibilities of the 
General Board of Church and Society 

Gibson, James A. Ill, SGA 22334<;S-1104-D Responsibilities of tiie Gen- 
eral Board of Church and Society 

Gibson, James A. Ill, SGA 22335<;S-1104-D Responsibilities of the Gen- 
eral Board of Church and Society 

Gibson, James A.III, SGA 21539-GJ-816-D PoUcies Relative to Socially 
Responsible Investments 

GJ 20540-GJ-NonDis-OS REPORT: Site Selection Task Force for GBGM 

Gooding, Dick, Calvary United Methodist Church, Sherrodsville, OH 
20786-DI-NonDis-O Baptism Study 

Gregg, Odie, Hartselle UMC, HartseUe, AL 22164-CO-602-D Composi- 
tion of The General Conference 

Gregg, Odie, Hartselle United Metiiodist Church, Hartselle, AL 20797- 
GJ-4-C Indusiveness of the Church 

Gregg, Odie, United Methodist Church of Hartselle, Hartselle, AL 
20778-CO-13-C Meeting of the General Conference 

Gregg, Odie, United Methodist Church of HartseUe, HartseUe, AL 
20779-CO-14-C The Responsibility of General Conference 

GrifBth, Thomas H., CAP 22560FA-2516-D Sale. Transfer. Lease or Mort- 
gage of Annual Conference Property 

Griffith, Thomas H., CAP 22561-FA-2518.2-D Mortgage of Sale of Real 
Property by a District Board of Trustees 

Griffith, Thomas H., CAP 22564-FA-NonDis-O Plan Documentforthe Min- 
isterial Pension Plan 

Griffith, Thomas H., CAP 22565-FA-NonDis-O Plan Document of the Min- 
isterial Pension Plan 

Griffith, Thomas H., CAP 22574-LC-257.3-D ResponsibiUties of the Admin- 
istrative Board 

Griffith, Thomas H., CAP 22596-MN448.1-D Leave of Absence 

Griffith, Thomas H., CAP 22597-MN454.1-D Grievance Procedures 

Griffith, Thomas H., CAP 22598-MN454.3-D Recommendation to Admin- 
isU-ativc Location 

Griffith, Thomas H., CAP 22605-MN-2618-D Statement of Information by 
the Judicial Council 

Griffith, Thomas H., CAP 22606-MN-2622.3-D Fair Process 

Griffith, Thomas H., CAP 22607-MN-2623.1-D Additional Chargeable Of- 
fenses 



54 



Daily Edition Vol. 5 No. 1 



Griffith, Thomas H., CAP 22608-MN-2625 3D Investigation of a Clergy 

Member of an Annual Conference 
Griffith, Thomas H., CAP 22609-MN-2628-D Miscellaneous Provisions 
Grimes, Shiriey, Shiloh ITMC. Granite Quarry, NC 22759-FA-90frD Re- 
garding the "Black College Fund" and the "United Methodist Student Day 
Fund" 
Gross, Martha J., WOH 22134-LC-270.1-D Committee on Nominations and 

Personnel 
GSW 20071-GJ4-C Inclusiveness of the Church 
Guerard, Susan & John ♦ Allred, Scott St. Mark's UMC, Bakersfield, 

CA 22582-CS-71-D Aborhon 
Halhnan, Howard W., Araby UMC, Frederick, MD 22092-MN-532-D 

Criteria in the Appointment Making Process 
Handy, VV. T., Bishop, COB 22063-MN423-D Rights and Responsibilities 
Handy, W. T., Jr, Bishop, COB 22154-C0-12C Composition of General 

Conference 
Handy, W. T., Jr., Bishop 22111-LC-227-D Affiliate and Associate Mem- 
bers 
Hardeman, John C, First UMC, Florence, AL 22821LCNonDis-0 Lay 

Member/Reserve Lay Members to Annual Conference 
Heavner, B., Quick, J., Anderson, T. Euper, Jackie, NWT, NAK, WNY, 
DET Youth Directors, Lubbock, TX 22747-DI-NonDis-OS Celebrate 
and Implement the Focus on Young People; Walking Together in the Way 
that Leads to Life 
Held, Richard E. + 10 Members of Louisa UMC, KEN, Louisa, KY 

21023-MN-313.2-D Mandatary Retirement 
Held, Richard E. + 10 Members of Louisa UMC, KEN 22079-MN-509.1-D 

Mandatory Retirement 
Held, Richard E., KEN 22263-GJ-814.3-D Provisions Pertaining to Staff 
Held,Richard,Pierce, Ward,+ 2 Church Grps., 2 Ind., KEN & WMI, 

Louisa, KY 21024-MN452.1-D Mandatory Retirement 
Hemdon, Charles M., OKL 20830-MN-518-D Missional Reasons 
Hershber^er, Nyle M., Belmont UMC, Johnstovm, PA 22558-DI-NonDis- 

O Institute Service of Infant Dedication 
Hill, James R., CAP 22676-LC-248.14-D Duties of the Charge Conference 
Hill, James R. , CAP 2269O-MN-402.2-D Relation of Ordained Ministers to 

the Ministry of All Christians 
Hill, James R., CAP 22734-CO-506.2-D Process of Election at Jurisdictional 

and Central Conferences 
Hill, James R., CAP 22735-CO-603-D Presiding Officers of General Confer- 
ence 
Hill, James R., CAP 22752-FA-712-D Apportionments 
HiU, James R., CAP 22820-LC-2533.1-D Board of Trustees - Powers and 

Limitations 
HUl, James R., CAP 22830-MN413.2-D Voting Rights of Probationary 

Members 
Hill, James R., CAP 22838-MN-423.1-D Rights and Responsibilities 
Hill, James R., CAP 22847-MN-514.2-D Specific Responsibilities of Bishops 
HUl, James R., CAP 22852-MN-2623.1-D Chargeable Offenses 
HUl, James R., CAP 22853-MN-2623.1-D Chargeable Offenses 
HUl, James R., CAP 22854-MN-2623.1-D Chargeable Offenses 
Hines, William, WOH 22253-FA-NonDis-O DisU-ibution of Limited Funds 
Historical Society, the United Methodist Church, Durham, NC 20754- 

CO-702-D Composition and Character of Annual Conference 
Historical Society, the United Methodist Church 20756-FA-907.14-D 

Membership of the Historical Society of the United Methodist Church 
Historical Society, the United Methodist Church 20757-GJ-810.1-D Pro- 
visions pertaining to General Agency Membership 
Historical Society, the United Methodist Church 20758-IC-1810.1-D His- 
torical Society 
Historical Society, the United Methodist Church 20759-LC-210-D 

Church Membership 
Historical Society, the United Methodist Church 20760-LC-248.5-D 

Powers and Duties 
Historical Society, the United Methodist Church 20761-LC-252.1-D Re- 
sponsibilities of a Local Church Lay Leader 
Historical Society, the United Methodist Church 20762-LC-271.6-D The 

Constituting Church Conference 
Historical Society, the United Methodist Church 20763-LC-271.7-D The 

Charge Conference 
Historical Society, the United Methodist Church 20755-CO-707.1-D 

Conference Agencies 
HOL 20195-CS-71-D Human Sexuality 
HOL 20720-GJ-808-D Board of Organization 



HOL 20721-GJ-810-D ProvisionsPertainingtoGeneral Agency Membership 
HOL 20722-MN-2623.1D Chargeable Offenses 
HOL 20723-H&1517 2-D Membershipof the University Senate 
HOL 20724-HE-1518-D Purposes and Objectives 

Hohnes, KUton, Arlington United Methodist Church, Poynette. WI 
20025CS-NonDis-OS Task Force to Stijdy Food Distribution in the United 
States to Low Income Persons 
Horton, Alvin J., VIR 22469-FA-711.3-D World Service and Conference 

Benevolences Budget 
Hurst, David M., DET 22695-MN-452.6-D Retired Ordained Ministers 
Ingram, Robert D., EOH 22641-GJ-276-D Special Sundays: Earth Day 
Interagency Task Force on AIDS 21674-GM-NonDis-0$ Report and Rec- 
ommendation of the Interagency Task Force on AIDS 
Iowa Annual Conference Human Sexuality Committee 22612-CS-71-D 

Homosexuality and the Church 
Isley, Samuel W. Jr., Edenton St. UMC, Raleigh, NC 22414-MN-402.1-D 

Ministry in the Christian Church 
Ivey, Ruth Ann, Bethany UMC, Summerville, SC 22246-FA-1606.2-D 

Powers. Duties, and Responsibilities 
Ivey, Ruth Ann, Bethany UMC, SummervUIe, SC, 22901-FA-1606.20-D 

The Annual Conference Board of Pensions 
IWA, CNV, WNC, MSS, DKT, NNJ, WIS, and 25 other. Annual Confer- 
ences 20082-IC-NonDis-O AdoptionofCOCU Proposal 
IWA, EOH, GBOD, NYMO 20235-DI-NonDis-O YouUiA'oungAdultprior- 

ity of General Conference for 1997-2000 
IWA, EOH, KSE 20U2-MN-412.1-D Part-time and Student Local Pastor 
IWA, RBM 20239-GM-NonDis-O Encounter with Christ Program 
IWA 20040-MN-408.5-D Part-time and student local pastors 
IWA 20066-CO-702-D Part-Tune and Student Local Pastors 
IWA 20073-GJ-812-D Board and agency membership changes 
IWA 20076-GM-NonDis-O Welfare to Wholeness 
IWA 20110-DI-NonDis-O Baptism 
IWA 20121-CS-71-D Christian Sexual Morality 
IWA 20246-MN-NonDis-OS A study commission for matters of health and 

fitness related to clergy appt. and lay employment 
James Martin, Zion United Methodist Church, AdeU, WI 20805-MN- 

NonDis-O Study of The Itineracy 
Johnson, David K + 2 Church Groups + 6 Ind., Bering Memorial UMC, 

Houston, TX 21028-MN-402.2-D Human Sexuality 
Johnson, David K., Bering Memorial UMC, Houston, TX 22214-DI-Non- 
Dis-O The Renewal of Theology and Mission in The United Methodist 
Church 
Johnson, WiUiam R., IWA 2215frCO-38C Ministerial Delegates to Gen- 
eral, Jurisdictional or Central Conferences 
Johnson, WilUam R., IWA 22158-CO-39-C Lay Delegates to the General, 

Jurisdictional or Central Conference 
Johnston, Janet, Lakeway UMC, PoOsboro, TX 22532-LC-264.6-D 

United Methodist Women 
Jones, Dale E., KEN 22563-FA-NonDis-O Evaluate the Comprehensive 

Protection Plan for Active Clergy during 1997-2000 
Jones, Scott J. & Heitzenrater, Richard P., First UMC, Commerce, TX 

22385-MN-527.5-DS Committee on Theological Dialogue 
Jones, W. Paul, Dr., MOW 20815-MN448-D Ecumenical Affiliation 
Jones, W. Paul, Dr., MOW 20822-Dl-NonDis-O Ecumenical Committnent 

within Our Theological Task 
Kalamazoo District Committee on Ordained Ministry, Cassopolis, MI 

22622-CO-36-C Annual Conferences 
KEN 20700<;S-71-D Human Sexuality 
KEN 20704-CS-71-D Abortion 
KEN 20705CS-71D Abortion 
KEN 2070&CS71-D Abortion 
KEN 20707-CS-71-D Abortion 

KEN 20717-FA-710.3-D Requests rather than Apportionments 
KEN 20718-FA-7n 3-D The Separation of World Service and Conference 

Benevolence into two separate line items 
KEN 20725-LC-NonDis-O Work Area on Prayer in the Local Church 
KEN 20734-MN402 2-D Ordination and Appointinent of Homosexual Per- 
sons and Advocates of the Homosexual Lifestyle 
KEN 20744-GJ-NonDis-O Relocation of die General Board of Global Minis- 
tries 
KEN 20745-M N-733. ID Annual Conference Board of Ordained Ministry 
Kingswood Project, MOW 22709-GJ-NonDis-O$ Resolution Proclaiming a 
Quadrennium of the Worker 



April 16, 1996 



Knotts, Alice G., ORI 22575-LC-262.11-D The Work Area Chairperson of 

Worship 
Knotts, Alice G., ORI 22580-CS-71-D Rights of Homosexual Persons 
Knotts, .Alice G., ORI 22590-MN-404 4D EUminatethe Footnote 
Krcmer, James R, CPA 20828-MN-416.2-D Special Conditions 
KSE, Sa T.F. on Proposed K. C. Episcopal Area 20542-CONonDis-OS 

Metropolitan-Based Episcopal Areas 
KSE 20359-CS-NonDis-O Separation of Church and Stale 
KSE 20387-MN-416.2-D Special Conditions for Admission to Probationary 

Membership 
KSE 20388-MN-419-D EliminationofCategory of Associate Members 
KSE 20389-MN-420-D Elimination of Category of Associate Member 
KSE 20390-MN-421-D Progression to Full Membership for Associate Mem- 
bers 
KSE 20391-MN-424.3-D AssociateMemberspriortoEliminationofCategory 
KSW, KSE, SCJ T.F. on Proposed K.C Episcopal Area 20541-CO-Non 

Dis-0$ The Jurisdictional System of Organization 
KSW 20372-FA-714.2-D Annual Audit Reports 
KSW 20385-MN-406.I-D Local Pastor: Authority and Duties 
KSW 20386-MN408.5-D Local Pastors on all Boards and EUgible as clerg 

Delegates 
Kuyper, Robert L., CNV 22155-CO-35-C Equalization of Clergy and Lay 

Members at Annual Conference 
Kuyper, Robert L., CNV 22239-FA-906.12-D Support for Programs Incon- 
sistent with the Social Principles 
Kuyper, Robert L., CNV 22311-CS7I-D Supporting the Rights of Former 

Homosexuals 
Kuyper, Robert L., CNV 22434-CO-610.3-D Support for Programs Inconsis- 
tent with the Social Principles 
Kuyper, Robert L., CNV 22516-GJ-4-C Opening Our Church to Those Who 

Struggle with Homosexuality 
Kuyper, Robert L., CNV 22528-LC-208-D Church Membership 
LaDelfa, Laurie K., Riviera UMC, St. Petersburg, PL 22731-CS-NonDis-O 

A Commitment to Our Children, Regarding the Use of Tobacco 
Lane, James W., Levy UMC, Sherwood, AR 22107-LC-208-D TheChurch 

Membership 
Lawler, Larry, CIL 20782-CO-38C: Clergy Conference Membership 
Lawler, Larry, CIL 20784-CO-702-D Clergy Conference Membership 
Lawler, Larry, CIL 20913-MN412-D Clergy Conference Membership 
Lawler, Carry, CIL 20914-MN-423-D Rights and Responsibilities of Full 

Members 
Lay Members, Aldersgate, Good Samaritan UMC, St Louis Park, Edina, 

MN 20007-LC-248-D Responsibility of the Charge Conference 
Leckrone, June R., Centenary UMC, Portsmoudi, VA 2236SLC-221-D 

Children and The Church 
Lepley, Ralph J, NCA 22592-MN-423.1-D Rights and Responsibilities of 

Full Clergy Members 
Lepley, Ralph J., NCA 22599-MN-530.1-D Appointment Making 
Lepley, Ralph J., NCA 22600-MN-533.7-D Process of AppoinBnent-Making 
Lepley, Ralph J., WNC 22248-FA-NonDis-O Basic Salary Plan 
Lewis, Ruth W., Ames UMC, Baltimore, MD, 23027-GJ-274-D Children and 

Youth Sunday 
Lippse, Charles E., TEN 22846-MN-513-D Involuntary Termination of Of- 
fice 
LRK 2(X)01-CS-71-D To change wording in the Social Principles concerning 

abortion 
Lum, Allen H., NNY 22339-CSNonDis-O The Homosexual Issue 
Lum, Allen, NYK, 2287&CS71-D Openess to Homosexuals in the United 

Methodist Church 
Lundy, J. T., First-Centenary U.M.C., Chattanooga, TN 20807-MN-5CM: 

Council of Bishops 
Lundy, J.T., First-Centenary United Methodist Church, Chattanooga, 

TN 20785-CO-702.1-D Local Pastors voting rights 
Lundy, James T., First-Centenary U.M.C., Chattanooga, TN 2081 l-MN- 

435.3-D The Order of Elder 
Lydick, Howard +33 oUier Individuals & 1 Adm. Bd., First UMC, 
Richardson, TX 22035-IC-NonDis-OS Establish a Standing General 
Commission on Alcohol and Drugs 
Lydick, Howard L., First UMC, Richardson, TX 21537-GJ-803-D Amena- 
bility and Program Accountability 
Lydick, Howard L., First UMC, Richardson, TX 21547-MN-2623.1 D 
Chargeable Offenses 



Lydick, Howard L., First UMC, Richardson, TX 21554-GJ-NonDis-O Re- 
location of the General Board of Global Ministiies 

Lydick, Howard L., First UMC, Richardson, TX 22048-MN404.4-D The 
Certified Candidate 

Lydick, Howard L., First UMC, Richardson, TX 22198<;0-NonDis-0 
Use Standard English in The Book of Discipline 

Lydick, Howard L., First UMC, Richardson, TX 22222-DI-NonDis-O In- 
clude the Hymn "Eternal Father, Sti-ong To Save" in the Next Printing of the 
U.M. Hymnal 

Lydick, Howard L., First UMC, Richardson, TX 22223-DI-NonDis-O In- 
clude The 2nd. Verse of "America The Beautihil" in the Next Printing of the 
U. M. Hymnal 

Lydick, Howard L., First UMC, Richardson, TX 22224-DI-NonDis-O 
Omit the 4th. Verse of tlie Hymn "Praise To The Lord, The Almighty" in the 
Printing of the Hymnal 

Lydick, Howard L, First UMC, Richardson, TX 22225^DI-NonDis-0 Re- 
garding the Service of Holy Communion 

Lydick, Howard L., First UMC, Richardson, TX 22356-CO-NonDis-O 
Commend Rev. Donald E. Wildmon 

March, Susan, Amboy UMC, Amboy, IN 22604-MN-1529-D Responsibili- 
ties of the Division of Ordained Ministiy 

MARCHA 22704-CS-NonDis-O Resolution for Economic Development of 
Puerto Rico 

MARCHA 2270frCO-NonDis-O Resolution in Support of the Rio Grande 
Conference 

MARCHA 22708-GJ-NonDis-O In Support of the General Council on Minis- 
tiies 

MARCHA 22711-GM-NonDis-O In Oppositio of Building a Radar in die Lajas 
Valley and the Town of Vieques, Puerto Rico 

MARCHA 22712-GM-NonDis-O Encounter with Christ in Latin America and 
the Caribbean 

MARCHA 22713-GM-NonDis-O Free the Puerto Rican PoUtical Prisoners 

MARCHA 22714-GM-NonDis-O Proposition 187 of CaUforaia 

MARCHA 22788-HE-NonDis-O! Funding die EvangeUcal Seminary of 
Puerto Rico 

MARCHA 22810-lC-NonDis-O Instihitional Racism in General Church Proc- 
esses 

its of the 

Martin, James, Zlon UMC, AdeU, WI 20823-FA-NonDisO The Annual 
Salary of Bishops 

Martin, James, Zion United Methodist Church, AdeU, WI 20787-DI-Non- 
Dis-O The Washing of Feet 

Martin, James, Zion United Methodist Church, AdeU, WI 20788-DI-Non- 
Dis-OS Establish a General Board of Evangelism 

Martin, James, Zion United Methodist Church, AdeU, WI 20804-MN- 
NonDis-O Pastoral Changes 

Martin, James, Zion United Methodist Church, AdeU, WI 20806-MN- 
NonDis-0 Selecting the Distiict Superintendent 

Martin, James, Zion UMC, AdeU, WI, 23014-CO-NonDis-O The Election 
Procedures for Bishops 

Martin, James, Zion UMC, AdeU, WI, 23013<:O-NonDis-O General Con- 
ference Legislative Committees 

Martin, James, Zion UMC, AdeU, WI, 23012-CO-NonDis-O Lay Persons 
Responsibilities at General Conference 

Martin, James, Zion UMC, AdeU, WI, 2301 1-CO-NonDis-O Responsibilities 
of Bishops at General Conference 

Martin, James, Zion UMC, AdeU, WI, 23015<:O-NonDis-O Jurisdictions 
and Jurisdictional Conferences 

Martin, James, Zion UMC, AdeU, WI, 23010-CO-NonDis-O General Confer- 
ence Sessions 

Martin, James, Zion UMC, AdeU, WI, 230(»CO-NonDis-O Delegates 
Expenses to Conferences 

Martin, James, Zion UMC, AdeU, WI, 23020-LC-NonDis-O Chair of the 
Local Church Nominating Committee 

Martin, James, Zion UMC, AdeU, WI, 23016<:O-NonDis-O Annual Confer- 
ence Membership 

Martin, James, Zion UMC, AdeU, WI, 23017-CaNonDis-O Voting Rights 
of Pastors 

Martin, James, Zion UMC, AdeU, WI, 23018-GJ-NonDis-O Chairpersons 
of Boards and Agencies 

Martin, Wilber Jarold, Oswego Prairie UMC, Montgomery, IL 20989-DI- 
279. ID Local Church Lay Speaker 

Martineau, Larry W., NAK 20878-DI-745.2-D Membership of Uie Confer- 
ence Council on Youth Ministry 



56 



Daily Edition Vol. 5 No. 1 



Mayhugh, W. Michael, NTS. 22146-LC-2534.5-D Permanent Endowment 
Fund Committee 

Mayo, Robert, WMI 20109-D!NonDis-O Development of Bible Distribu- 
tion Ministries within the United Methodist Church 

McCuUough, June D., Audubon UMC, Audubon, NJ 22418-MN-513.5-D 
Complaints prepared by the Review Committee 

McCuUough, June D., Audubon IMC, Audubon, NJ 22477-GJ-810.3-D 
Eligibility for Election to General Agencies 

McDonald, Pat, First UMC, Bridgeport, TX 20900-LC-NonDis-O Day 
Care Facilities 

McGinJey, A.T + 7 other individuals & 1 Adm. Bd., Findlay, OH 22525^ 
IC-NonDis-OS Churches in Covenant Communion: The Church of Christ 
Uniting 

McGonegai; Donal, White Stone UMC, Wlute Stone, VA 20981-CS-72-D 
Rights of Racial and Ethnic Persons 

McGonegai, Donal, White Stone UMC, White Stone, VA 20982-CS^74 D 
Criminal Justice 

McGonegai, Donal, White Stone UMC, White Stone, VA 20983-CS-74-D 
Mibtary Service 

Mclntyre, Alan, OKL 22529-LC-216.1-D Admission into the Church 

McNaughton, John, WMI 20972-CS-71-D Reconciling Congregations 

Methodist Federation For Social Action, CPA, 2, Churches 20886-GJ- 
NonDis-0 Relocation of the General Board of Global Ministries 

Methodist Federation for Social Action, CPA, Harrisburg, PA 20857-CS- 
NonDis-0 Clinic Violence 

Methodist Federation For Social Action, CPA, Harrisburg, PA 20858- 
CSNonDis-0 Use of 'The Church Studies Homosexuality" 

Methodist Federation For Social Action, CPA 20836-FA-722.12-D 
Shared Salary Plan Option 

Methodist Federation For Social Action, CPA 20843-MN-304.1-D Candi- 
dacy for Diaconal Ministry 

Methodist Federation for Social Action, CPA 20859-CS-R53frU Gun Vio- 
lence 

Methodist Federation For Social Action, CPA 20860-GM-NonDis-O Op- 
position to Abusive Treatment Methods of Persons with Mental Disabilities 

Methodist Federation for Social Action, CPA 20861-CS-NonDis-O To- 
bacco Marketing by Philip Morris and RJR Nabisco 

Methodist Federation for Social Action, CPA 20863-CSR634-U Recogni- 
tion of Cuba 

Methodist Federation for Social Action, CPA 20865-CS-71-D Human 
Sexuality 

Methodist Federation for Social Action, CPA 20866-CS-73-D Right to a 
Job 

Methodist Federation for Social Action, CPA 2086&<;S-72-D Basic Hu- 
man Rights 

Methodist Federation For Social Action, CPA 20876-DI-NonDis-O Af 
firming Our Theological Task 

Methodist Federation For Social Action, CPA 20887-GJ-NonDis-O The 
Church and God's Creation 

Methodist Federation for Social Action, CPA 20888^GJ-NonDis-O$ 
Meetings and a U. S. Convocation on "Heterosexism And The Mission of 
The Church" 

Methodist Federation For Social Action, CPA 20895-lC-NonDis-O Con- 
cerning Names Demeaning to Native Americans 

Metiiodist Federation for Social Action, CPA 20896-IC-NonDis-O Reaf- 
firmation of the Ecumenical Decade in Solidarity with Women 

Methodist Federation for Social Action, CPA 20897-IC-NonDis-O Ra- 
cism Today 

Metiiodist Federation for Social Action, NYK 22410-Dl-NonDis-O A 
United Methodist Alternative to Promise Keepers 

Methodist Federation for Social Action, NYK 22411-DI-NonDis-O Af- 
firming our Theological Task 

Methodist Federation for Social Action, NYK 22423-1C-2101-D Affirming 
die Commission on Religion and Race 

Methodist Federation for Social Action, NYK 22424-IC-2201-D Affirming 

the Commission on the Status and Role of Women 
Methodist Federation for Social Action, NYK 22425-IC-R580-U Holy 

Land Tours 
Methodist Federation for Social Action, NYK 2242&^lC-NonDis-0 Ra 

cism Today 
Methodist Federation for Social Action, NYK 22427-IC-NonDis-O Con- 
cerning Names Demeaning to Native Americans 
Methodist Federation for Social Action, NYK 22454-CSNonDis-O Call 
for a Rebirth of Compassion 



Methodist Federation for Social Action, NYK 2245&CS-NonDis-0 Use 

of The Church Studies Homosexuality 
Methodist Federation for Social Action, NYK 22461-CS-NonDis-O A Na- 
tional Health Care Program 
Metiiodist Federation for Social Action, NYK 22462-CS-NonDis-O Af- 
firming Uie Household EcoTeam Program 
Metiiodist Federation for Social Action, NYK 22464-CS-R536-U Gun Vio- 
lence 
Methodist Federation for Social Action, NYK 22465<;S-NonDis-0 

World-Wide AboUtion of Nuclear Weapons by the Year 2000 
Methodist Federation for Social Action, NYK 22468-FA-723-D Shared 

Salary Plan Option 
Metiiodist Federation for Social Action, NYK 22505-CS-NonDis-O Jeru- 
salem 
Methodist Federation for Social Action, NYK 22508<:S-NonDis-O Abun- 
dant Living - Sustainabler Lifestyle 
Metiiodist Federation for Social Action, NYK 22518-GJ-NonDis-OS A 

U.S. Convocation on "Heterosexism and the Mission of the Church" 
Metiiodist Federation for Social Action, NYK 22519-GM-R634-U Recog- 
nition of Cuba 
Methodist Federation for Social Action, NYK 22521-GM-NonDis-O The 

U.S. Agricultural Crisis 
Methodist Federation for Social Action, NYK 22526-IC-NonDis-O Reaf- 
firmation of the Ecumenical Decade in Solidarity with Women 
Metiiodist Federation for Social Action, NYK 22533-LC-2533-D Local 

Church Energy Audit 
Methodist Federation for Social Action, NYK 22589-MN-404.4-D Re- 
garding Fidelity 
Metiiodist Federation for Social Action, WOH 22475-FA-722.12-D Equi- 
table Compensation 
Methodist Federation for Social Action, WOH 22503-CS-NonDis-O Boy- 
cott Phillip Morris & RJ.R. Nabisco 
Methodist Federation for Social Action, WOH 22504<;S-NonDis-O Use 

of The Church Study on Homosexuality 
Metiiodist Federation for Social Action, WOH 22507-CS-NonDis-O 

Global Economy and the Environment 
Metiiodist Federation for Social Action, WOH 22509-CS-NonDis-O A 

Resolution on Reducing Gun Violence 
Metiiodist Federation for Social Action, WOH 22515-DI-NonDis-O A 

Renewal Faithful to Our Heritage 
Metiiodist Federation for Social Action, WOH 22522-GM-NonDis-O 

United States Relations with Cuba 
Methodist Federation for Social Action, WOH 22531-LC-248.13-D Pow- 
ers and Duties of the Charge Conference 
Metiiodist Federation for Social Action 22415-MN-402.2-D Not Define 

"Self-Avowed Practicing Homosexual" 
Methodist Federation for Social Action 22416-MN-304.1-D Regarding Fi- 
delity 
Methodist Federation for Social Action 22445^:S-72-D Basic Human 

Rights 
Metiiodist Federation for Social Action 2244frCS-73-D Right to a Job: 

Work and Leisure 
Metiiodist Federation for Social Action 22447-CS-72-D The Rights of Sex- 
ual Minorities 
Metiiodist Federation for Social Action 22471-FA-907.3-D General 

Agency Energy Audits 
Metiiodist Federation for Social Action 22472-FA-2513-D Conference 

Trustees Energy Audits 
Metiiodist Federation for Social Action 22473-FA-2518-D District Trus- 
tees Energy Audit 
Methodist Federation for Social Action 22474-FA-NonDis-OS A Budget 

to Sustain the Church's Mission 
Methodist Federation for Social Action 22476-FA-NonDis-O Adequate 

Funding for Racial/Etiinic Minority Programs 
Metiiodist Federation for Social Action 22478-GJ-NonDis-0$ Quadren- 

nium of the Worker 
Methodist Federation for Social Action 22485-GM-NonDis-O Abusive 

Treatinent Methods for Persons with Mental Disabifities 
Methodist Federation for Social Action 22489-GM-NonDis-O The 

Church's Response to Ethnic and Religious Conflict 
Metiiodist Federation for Social Action, 2289&CS-R235-U Tobacco Market- 
ing by Phillip Morris and RJR Nabisco 
Metiiodist Federation for Social Action, 22902-GJ-NonDis-O The Church 
and God's Creation 



April 16, 1996 



57 



Methodist United for Peace with Justice 21373-MN-NUisO "Nuclear 
Abolition" 

Methodist United for Peace with Justice 22220-DI-NonDis-O Curriculum 
on Nonviolent Action and Peaceful Conflict Resolution 

MFSA, WOH BGM, 2 Churches and 19 Individuals, 22891-GJ-NonDis-O 
Location of the General Board of Global Ministries 

MFSA, 2 Adm. Councils/Groups & 45 Individuals, 22873-CS-71-D Hu- 
man Sexuality 

Michael, Greg, NorthviUe UMC, NorthviUe, MI 22251-FA-NonDis-O Es- 
tablishing a Relationship with a Major Credit Card Company 

MiUoy, Peter F., MNN 21529-MN-513.5-D Complaints Against Bishops 

Milloy, Peter, MNN 20092-LC-225-D Confirmation without vows of full 
membership 

Mission, C & S Committee and Adm. Council, St. Paul and St. Andrew 
UMC, New York, NfY 22510-CS-NonDis-OS A ReconciUng Denomina- 



Mission, C & S Committee and The Adm. Council, St. Paul and St. 
Andrew UMC, New York, NY 22527-1C-R242-U Ecumenical Decade: 
Churches in Solidarity with Women 

Mission, Church & Society and The Adm. Council, St. Paul and St 
Andrew UMC, New York, NY 22408-DI-NonDis-O Creation of Com- 
mitment Ceremonies for Same-Sex Couples within the United Methodist 
Church 

Mission, Church & Society Committee and Adm. C, Church of St. Paul 
and St Andrew UMC, New York, NY, 22892-GJ-NonDis-O For the 
General Board of Global Ministries to Remain in New York 

Mission and Outreach Cluster, Dumbarton UMC, Washington, DC, 
22889-CS-NonDis-O Campaign Finance Reform in the United States 

Missions & Concerns Cte., St. John's of Baltimore, City, 2 additional 
Churches and 1 Sunday School, Class 21003-GJ4-C Inclusivenessof 
the Church 

Missions and Social Concerns Committee, Church of the Redeemer 
UMC, Cleveland Heights, OH 20974-CS-71-D Human Sexuality 

MNN, NIL 20206-FA-906.12-D Fair and Inclusive Treatment of Persons of 
Homosexual Orientation 

MNN 20014-FA-737.4-D Prepositional payment 

MNN 20028-IC-NonDis-O Healing the Wounds of Genocidal Acts toward 
Native American and African American People 

MNN 20038-MN-314-D Grievance procedures for Diaconal Ministers 

MNN 20142-MN-454.1-D Congregation Notification and Extension of Clergy 
Suspension 

MNN 20l'43-MN-454.1-D Joint Review Committee 

MNN 20144-MN-454.1-D Notification of Congregation 

MNN 20145-MN-454,1-D Declaration of Lost Credentials 

MNN 20196-CS-71-D Fair and Inclusive Treatment of Persons of Homosex- 
ual Orientation 

MNN 20202-CO-609-D Omission of Unconstitutional Clauses: Editing 

MNN 20203-CO-611.2-D The Book of Resolution 

MNN 2021 1-MN-2616-D Omission of unconstitutional clauses; Notification 

MNN 20212-MN-2622.2-D Notice of Hearing 

MNN 20213-MN-2622-D Advocate or Counsel in a Fair Process 

MNN 20217-MN-2623-D Chargeable Offenses 

MNN 20225-MN-NonDis-OS Ordained Ministry in the 21st. Century 

MNN 20227-LC-248. 19-D Powers and Duties of a Charge Conference 

MNN 20245-LC-270 I-D Local Church Committee on Nominations and Per- 
sonnel 

MNN 21516-MN-426.2-D Ministers fiom Other Denominations 

MOE & MOW Structure Task Force of Reorientation, Columbia, MO 
22633-FA-709.6-D Amenability of the Annual Conference Council on Fi- 
nance and Administration 

MOE, MOW 20067-CO-726-D Flexibility in Annual Conference structure 

Morris, Paul B., Dr., WPA 22829-MN-411-D Counseling Elders 

MOW & MOE Structure Task Force on Reorientation, Columbia, MO 
22634-FA-710-D Responsibilities of the Council on Finance and Administi-a- 

MOW, MOE, NYK 20086-1C-739-D Conference Commission /Committee 

on Christian Unity and Interreligious Concerns 
MOW, MOE 20050-D1-729-D Flexibility in Annual Conference Structure 
MOW, MOE 20O68-CO-747-D Committee on Ministry 
MOW, MOE 20069-CO-752-D Disti-ict Council on MinisU-ics 
MOW, MOE 20O79-GM-731-D The ResponsibiUties of the Board of Global 

Ministiies 
MOW, MOE 20081-HE-732-D ResponsibiUties of die Board of Higher Edu- 
cation and Campus Ministry 



MOW, MOE 20085-IC-738.1-D FlexibiUly in Annual Conference Structure 
MOW, MOE 20088-1C-740-D Conference Commission on Religion and Race 
MOW, MOE 20O89-IC-741-D Flexibility in Annual Conference struchire 
MOW, MOE 20090-IC-742-D ResponsibiUties of a Commission on the Small 

Membership Church 
MOW, MOE, NYK 20072-GJ-748-D FlexibiUty in Annual Conference struc- 

MOW, MOE 20008-CS-728-D FlexibiUty in Annual Conference Stiiicture 
MOW, MOE 20051-DI-730-D FlexibiUty in Annual Conference StiTicture 
MOW 20105-LC-2549-D Retiring United Metiiodist Churches 
MOW 2()236-GJ-NanDis-0$ A Quadrennium of The Worker and Ministiies 

to ■ Working People and The Workplace 
MS 21733-MN-lOl-D Ministiyof all Christians 
MS 21734-MN-lOl-D Our Spiritual Forbears 
MS 21735-MN-103-D Servants of Christ 
MS 21736-MN-104-D The Heart of Christian Minisby 
MS 21737-MN-105-D The Ministry of All Christians 
MS 21738-MN-106-D The General MinisUy of All Christians 
MS 21739-MN-lll-D One Ministiy in Christ 
MS 21740-MN-112-D The Journey of a Connectional People 
MS 21741-MN-109-D ConnectionaUsm in United Metiiodist Tradition 
MS 21742-MN-108-D Servant Ministiy and Servant Leadership 
MS 21743-MN-llO-D The Minishr of All Christians 
MS 21744-MN-Ul-D Offices of Elder and Deacon 
MS 21745-MN-112-D Sen-ant Ministiy 
MS 21746-MN-112-D Christian Discipleship 
MS 21747-MN-113-D Our Relationship Witii God 
MS 21748-MN-l 14-D Our Relationship with Christ in the Worid 
MS 21749-MN-108-D Servant Leadership 
MS 21750-MN-108-D Servant Leadership 
MS 217.51-MN-116-D Tlie Office of Lay Ministiy Steward 
MS 21752-MN-llO-D Ordained Ministiy 
MS 21753-MN-113-D Called to Inclusiveness 
MS 21754-MN-113-D Called to Indus 



MS 21756-MN-114-D FulfiUment of Minisby 

MS 21757-MN-201-D The Office of Lay Ministry Steward 

MS 21758-MN-201D Congregations as Covenant Communities 

MS 21759-MN-202-D The Purpose of Christian Discipleship 

MS 21760-MN-202-D Christian Discipleship 

MS 21761-MN-203-D Christian Formation 

MS 21762-MN-204-D The Nahire of the Office of Lay Ministiy Steward 

MS 21763-MN-204-D The Nature of the Office of Lay MinisUy Steward 

MS 21764-MN-205-D Qualities Desired in a Lay Ministiy Steward 

MS 21765-MN-205-D TheGiftsof the Lay Ministiy Steward 

MS 21766-MN-206-D The Exercise of tiie Office of Uy Ministiy Steward 

MS 21767-MN-206-D Servant Leadership Roles of tiie Lay Ministry Steward 

MS 21768-MN-207-D Enti-ance Procedures for Lay Ministiy Stewards 

MS 21769-MN-301-D Relation to the Minisby of All Christians 

MS 21770-MN-302-D The Nahire of Diaconal Ministiy 

MS 21771-MN-303-D Enti-ance into Diaconal Minisby 

MS 21772-MN-304-D Candidacy for Diaconal Ministiy 

MS 21773-MN-305-D Continuation of Candidacy 

MS 21774-MN-306-D Completion of Candidacy 

MS 21775-MN-307-D Consecration 

MS 21776-MN-308-D General Provisions 

MS 21777-MN-309-D Rights of Diaconal Ministers 

MS 21778-MN-310-D ServiceAppointinentof Diaconal Ministers 

MS 21779-MN-311-D Credentials and Records 

MS 21780-MN-312-D Transfers 

MS 21781-MN-313-D Change in Charge Conference Relationship 

MS 21782-MN-314-D Relationship to the Charge Conference 

MS 21783-MN-315-D Relationship to Employing Agency 

MS 21784-MN-316-D Review of Diaconal Minister's Performance 

MS 21785-MN-317-D Termination Procedures 

MS 21786-MN-429-D Ordination and Apostolic Ministry 

MS 21787-MN-430-D The Purpose of Ordination 



58 



Daily Edition Vol. 5 No. 1 



MS 21788-MN-431-D 

MS 21789-MN-432-D 

MS 21790-MN-433-D 

MS 21791-MN434-D 

MS 21792-MN-435-D 

MS 21793-MN-401-D 

tians 

MS 21794-MN-402-D 

MS 21795-MN403-D 

MS 21796-MN-404-D 

MS 21797-MN-405-D 

MS 21798-MN-406-D 

MS 21799-MN-407-D 

MS 21800-MN-408-D 

MS 21801-MN-409-D 

MS 21802-MN-410-D 

MS 21803-MN-411-D 
MS 21804-MN-412-D 
MS 21805-MN-413-D 
MS 21806-MN414-D 

ship 
MS 21807-MN-415-D 
MS 21808-MN-416-D 
MS 21809-MN-417-D 
MS 21810-MN-418-D 
MS 21811-MN-419-D 
MS 21812-MN-420-D 
MS 21813-MN-421-D 
MS 21814-MN-301-D 
MS 21815-MN-301-D 
MS 21816-MN-302-D 
MS 21817-MN-303-D 
MS 21818-MN-304-D 
MS 21819-MN-305-D 
MS 21820-MN-305-D 

istry 
MS 21821-MN-306-D 
MS 21822-MN-307-D 
MS 21823-MN-308-D 

dacy 
MS 21824-MN-309-D 
MS 21825-MN-310-D 
MS 21826-MN-310-D 
MS 21827-MN-311-D 
MS 21828-MN-312-D 
MS 21829-MN-313-D 
MS 21830-MN-315-D 
MS 21831-MN-315-D 
MS 21832-MN-316-D 
MS 21833-MN-317-D 
MS 21834-MN-318-D 
MS 21835-MN-318-D 
MS 21836-MN-319-D 
MS 21837-MN-320-D 
MS 21838-MN-321-D 
MS 21839-MN-321-D 

Full Connection 
MS 21&40-MN-322-D 



Qualifications for Ordination 

The Act of Ordination 

Classification of Ordination 

The Order of Deacon 

The Order of Elder 

Relation of Ordained Ministers to Ministi7 of All Chris- 

MinistiT of Word. Sacrament, and Order 
Wesley's Questions 
Candidacy for Ordained Ministi-y 
Continuation of Candidacy 
Autiiority and Duties of Local Pastor 
License as a Local Pastor 
Categories of Local Pastor 
Continuance as a Local Pastor 
Existing, Reinstatement, and Retirement of Local Pas- 
Counseling Elders 
General Provisions 

Eligibility and Rights of Probationary Membership 
Qualifications for Election to Probationary Member- 



Educational Requii 

Special Conditions 

Continuation in Probationary Membership 

Discontinuance from Probationary Membership 

Eligibility and Rights of Associate Members 

Requirements for Election as Associate Members 

Progression into Full Membership 

MinisU-y of the Ordained 

Ministiy in the Christian Church 

Ordination and Apostolic Ministi7 

Purpose of Ordination 

Qualifications for Ordination 

Candidacy for Licensed and Ordained MinisU-y 

Enti-ance Procedures into licensed and Ordained Min- 

Candidacy for Licensed and Ordained Ministiy 

Continuation of Candidacy 

Discontinuance and Reinstatement of Certified Candi- 

Appointinent of Certified Candidates 

Clergy Orders 

Order of Deacons and Order of Elders 

Purpose for an Order 

Organization of an Order 

Membership in an Order 

The Ordained Deacon 

Relation to the Ministiy of All Christians 

The Ministry of Deacons 

Qualifications for Ordination as Deacon 

The Ordained Deacon as Probationary Member 

Meaning of Ordination 

Probationary Service of A Deacon 

Eligibility and Rights of Probationary Membership 

The Ordained Deacon in Full Connection 

Ministiy, Authority and Responsibilities of Deacons in 

Requirements for Admission of Deacon in Full Connec- 



MS 21848-MN437-D The Itinerant System 
MS 21849-MN-438-D Definition of a Pastor 

MS 21850-MN442-D Appointinents Beyond the Local United Methodist 
Church 

MS 21851-MN-443-D Elders in Appointment Beyond the Local Church 

MS 21852-MN-440-D Special Provisions 

MS 21853-MN-441-D Elders in Full Connection Appointed to Pastoral 
Charges 

MS 21854-MN-424-D Requirements for Admission to Full Connection and 
Ordination as Elder 

MS 21855-MN-425-D Historic Examination for Admission into Full Connec- 
tion and Ordination as Elder 

MS 21856-MN-426-D Clergy fi-om Other Annual Conferences and Denomi- 
nations 

MS 21857-MN-426-D Appointinents 

MS 21858-MN-427-D Transfers 

MS 21859-MN-428-D Recognition of Orders 

MS 21860-MN-406-D Authority and Duties 

MS 21861-MN-407-D License As a Local Pastor 

MS 21862-MN-341-D Interim License as Local Pastor 

MS 21863-MN-408-D Categories of Local Pastor 

MS 21864-MN-409-D Continuance As a Local Pastor 

MS 21865-MN-410-D Existing, Reinstatement, and Retirement of Local Pas- 
tors Who Are Not Ordained Deacons 

MS 21866-MN411-D Mentors 

MS 21867-MN419-D Eligibility and Rights of Associate Members 

MS 21868-MN-420-D Requirements for Election as Associate Members 

MS 21869-MN-421-D Progression into Full Membership 

MS 21870-MN445-D Evaluation for Continuing Formation 

MS 21871-MN445-D Continuing Formation and Spirihial Growth 

MS 21872-MN446-D Sabbatical Leave 

MS 21873-MN444-D Evaluation 

MS 21874-MN439-D Responsibilities and Duties of a Pastor 

MS 21875-MN-447-D Changes of Conference Relationship 

MS 21876-MN447-D Changes in Conference Relationship 

MS 21877-MN448-D Leave of Absence 

MS 21878-MN449-D Family Leave 

MS 21879-MN450-D Maternity/Paternity Leave 

MS 21880-MN451-D Disability Leave 

MS 21881-MN452-D Retirement 

MS 21882-MN453-D Honorable Location 

MS 21883-MN454-D Grievance Procedures 

MS 21884-MN454-D Grievance Procedures 

MS 21885-MN-455-D Readmission to Probationary Membership 

MS 21886-MN456-D Readmission after Honorable or Administrative Loca- 



f Deacons in Full Connection to Various 



MS 21841-MN-323-D Appointment! 
Ministi-ies 

MS 21842-MN-324-D The Ordained Elder in Full Connection 

MS 21843-MN-324-D Ministiy of an Elder 

MS 21844-MN422-D Elders in Full Connection 

MS 21845-MN-423-D Autiiority and Responsibilities of an Elderr in Full Con- 
nection 

MS 21846-MN-436-D Appointinents to Various Ministi-ies 

MS 21847-MN436-D General Provisions 



MS 21887-MN457-D 

MS 21888-MN458-D 

Conference 

MS 21889-MN459-D 

MS 21890-MN412-D 

MS 21891-MN412-D 

MS 21892-MN-364-D 

MS 21893-MN-201-D 

MS 21894-MN-201-D 

MS 21895-MN-202-D 

MS 21896-MN-203-D 

MS 21897-MN-204-D 

MS 21898-MN-205-D 

MS 21899-MN-206-D 

MS 2190OMN-206-D 

MS 21901-MN-207-D 

MS 21902-MN-208-D 

MS 21903-MN-209-D 

MS 21904-MN-21O-D 

MS 21905-MN-211-D 

MS 21906-MN-212-D 

MS 21907-MN-213-D 

MS 21908-MN-214-D 



Readmission after Surrender of the Ministerial Office 
Readmission afterTermination by Action of the Annual 

Readmission After hivoluntary Retirement 

General Provisions 

General Provisions 

Transitional Provisions 

Organization and Administi-ation 

Local Church 

The Church of Jesus Christ 

The Local Church as a Connectional Society 

Responsibilities of tiie Local Church 

Pastoral Charge 

Cooperative Parish 

Cooperative parish Ministries 

Churches in Transitional Communities 

Church Membership 

Church Membership 

Member of the Global United Methodist Connection 

The Meaning of Membership 

Faitiiful Membership 

Faithful Discipleship 

Members Called to Share tiie Ministiy 



April 16. 1996 



59 



MS 21909-MN-215-D 

MS 21910-MN-216-D 

MS 21911-MN-217-D 

MS 21912-MN-218-D 

MS 21913-MN-219-D 

MS 21914-MN-220-D 

MS 21915-MN-221-D 

MS 21916-MN-222-D 

MS 21917-MN-22a-D 

MS 21918-MN-224-D 

MS 21919-MN-225-D 

MS 21920-MN-226-D 

MS 21921-MN-227-D 

MS 21922-MN-228-D 

MS 21923-MN-229-D 

MS 21924-MN-230-D 

MS 21925-MN-231-D 

MS 21926-MN-232-D 

MS 21927-MN-233-D 

MS 21928-MN-234-D 

MS 21929-MN-235-D 

MS 21930-MN-236-D 

MS 21931-MN-237-D 

MS 21932-MN-238-D 

MS 21933-MN-239-D 

MS 21934-MN-240-D 

MS 21935-MN-241-D 

MS 21936-MN-242-D 

MS 21937-MN-243-D 

MS 21938-MN-244-D 

MS 21939-MN-245-D 

MS 21940-MN-246-D 

MS 21941-MN-247-D 

MS 21942-MN-248-D 

MS 21943-MN-446-D 

MS 21944-MN-248-D 

MS 21945-MN-248-D 

MS 21946-MN-249-D 

MS 21947-MN-250-D 

MS 21948-MN-251-D 

MS 21949-MN-452-D 

MS 21950-MN-252-D 

MS 21951-MN-253-D 

MS 21952-MN-254-D 

MS 21953-MN-255-D 

MS 21954-MN-256-D 

MS 21955-MN-257-D 

MS 21956-MN-258-D 

MS 21957-MN-259-D 

MS 21958-MN-260-D 

MS 21959-MN-261-D 

MS 21960-MN-262-D 

MS 21961-MN-263-D 

MS 21962-MN-264-D 

MS 21963-MN-265-D 

MS 21964-MN-266-D 

MS 21965-MN-267-D 

MS 21966-MN-268-D 

MS 21967-MN-269-D 

MS 21968-MN-270-D 

MS 21969-MN-271-D 

MS 21970-MN-272-D 

MS 21971-MN-273-D 

MS 21972-MN-274-D 

MS 21973-MN-275-D 

MS 21974-MN-276-D 

MS 21975-MN-277-D 



Members Held Accountable for Faithfulness 

Admission into the Church 

Admission into the Chruch 

Admission into the Church 

Admission into the Church 

Admission into the Church 

Children and the Church 

Children and the Church 

Children and the Church 

Children and the Church 

Children and the Church 

Youth 

Affiliate and Associate Membership 

Care of Members 

Care of Members 

Care of Members 

Care of Members 

Membership Records and Reports 

Membership Records 

Membership Records 

Membership Secretary 

Transfer and Termination of Membership 

Transfer and Termination of Membership 

Transfer and Termination of Membership 

Transfer of Membership 

Certificate of Transfer 

Transfer of Membership 

Withdrawal of Membership 

Withdrawal of Membership 

Organization and Administration 

Basic Organizational Plan for Local Church 

Standards for Computer Information and Data 

General Provisions 

Powers and Duties 

Members of the Chrge Conference and Administrative 

Powers and Duties of the Charge Conference 

Powers and Duties of the Charge Conference 

The Church Conference 

Election of Leaders 

Election of Stewards 

Election of Lay Ministry Steward 

Lay Leader 

The Administrative Council 

Purpose of the Administrative Board 

Membership of the Administrative Board 

Organization 

Responsibilities 

The Council on Ministries 

Basic Membership of Council on Ministries 

Age-Level, Family, and Specialized Coordinators 

Work Areas 

Work Area Chairperson 

Program Support Personnel 

Program Agencies 

United Methodist Men 

Age-Level and Family Councils 

Work Area Commissions 

Task Groups 

Classes, Class Leaders, and Class Meetings 

Administrative Committees 

Organizing a New Local Church 

Transfer of a Local Church 

Protection of Rights of Congregations 

Special Sundays 

Churchwide Special Sundays With Offerings 

Special Sundays Without Churchwide Offerings 

Three Special Sundays 



MS 21976-MN-278-D Lay Speaking 

MS 21977-MN-279-D Local Church Lay Speaker 

MS 21978-MN-280-D Certified Lay Speaker 

MS 21979-MN-281-D Transfer of Certification by Certified Lay Speakers 

MS 21980-MN-282-D Lay Preacher 

MS 21981-MN-501-D The Task of the Superintendent 

MS 21982-MN-504-D Offices of Bishops and Superintendents 

MS 21983-MN-514-D Spiritual and Temporal Leadership 

MS 21984-MN-516-D Working with Ordained, Licensed, Consecrated and 

Commissioned Personnel 
MS 21985-MN-522-D Pastoral Responsibilities of District Superintendent 
MS 21986-MN-527.1-D The Council of Bishops 
MS 21987-MN-529.1-D The Cabinet 

MS 21988-MN-702-D Composition and Character of The Annual Conference 
MS 21989-MN-705-D Business of the Conference 
MS 21990-MN-722 2-D Equitqble Compensation 
MS 21991-MN-733-D Conference Board of Ordained Ministry 
MS 21992-MN-734-D Board of Diaconal Ministry 
MS 21993-MN-756.1-D District Committee on Ordained Ministry 
MS 21994-MN-1202-D ResponsibiUties of the General Board of Discipleship 
MS 21995-MN-1505-D Objectives of the General Board of Higher Education 

and Ministry 
MS 21996-MN-1508.1-D Divisions ofthe General Board of Higher Education 

and Ministry 
MS 21997-MN-1509.1-D Eliminate Divisions of Ordained and Diaconal Min- 
istry 
MS 21998-MN-1524-D Deacons 
MS 21999-MN-1524-D Divisionof Diaconal Ministry 
MS 22000-MN-1525-D Purpose of Division of Diaconal Ministry 
MS 22001-MN-1526-D ResponsibiUties of Division of Diaconal Ministry 
MS 22002-MN-1527-D Work and Care of Elders and Local Pastors 
MS 22003-MN-1527-D Work and Care of Elders and Local Pastors 
MS 22004-MN-1528-D The Nominating Committee 
MS 22005-MN-1529-D Specific Responsibilities of Board of Higher Education 

and Ministry 
MS 22006-MN-153O-D Schools of Theology 
MS 22007-MN-1531-D Education and Preparation of Shidents 
MS 22008-MN-1532-D Responsibibty for Education and Formation 
MS 22009-MN-3&C Ministerial Delegates to tiie General. Jurisdictional and 

Central Conferences 
MS 22010-MN-NonDis-O Revision of Ordination Services for Deacons 
MS 22011-MN-NonDis-O Consecrations and Ordinations 685 
MS 22012-MN-NonDis-O Revision of The Ordination of Elders 
MSS 20204-CO-702-D VotingStatusof Retired Clergy at Annual Conference 
N. Central Jurisdictional Committee on Episcopacy 22380-MN-509.1-D 

Mandatory Retirement of Bishops 
Naapi, Leo L., Covenant UMC, Reedsport, OR 22495-CS-71-D Human 

Sexuality 
Naapi, Leo L., Covenant UMC, Reedsport, OR 22588-MN402.2-D Rela- 
tions of Ordained Ministers to the MinistiT of All Christians 
Nagle, Elizabeth C. & Frederick W., First irMC, Madison, WI 22863- 

MN-NonDis-O Clergy Counseling 
NAIC + SCA Coram, on CCUIC * OKL 22023-lC-NonDis-O Adopt the 

proposal "Churches in Covenant Communion 
NAK, HOL 20289-CS-71-D Concerning Alternatives to Abortion 
NAK, SIL, EOH, WVA, HOL, TEX 20526-CS71-D Human Sexuality 
NAL 20184-CS-71-D Abortion: The beginning and ending of life 
NAL 20209-GJ-802.4-D Amenability and Program Accountability 
Namic, Bernard E., NGA 22313-CS-71-D Abortion 
Nashville UM Administrative Board & Charge Con/., Nashville UM, 

Nashville, GA 22619<:S-NonDis-0 Restore Religious Freedom 
Nat Assoc. Deaconeses & Church and Commimity 22643-GM-1418.5-D 

Voting Rights for Deaconesses 
Natj\ssoc. Deaconeses & Church & Community Workers 22624-CO- 

702 3-D Voting Rights for Deaconesses 
Nation United Methodist Native American Center 22281-GM-1403.1-D 

Objectives of tiie General Board of Global Ministiies 
National Assoc, of A. C. Lay Leaders Committee 22512-DI-757.2-D Dis- 

tiict Board of Laity 
National Assoc. ofAnn. Conference Lay Leaders 22404-DI-730.1-D Con- 
ference Board of Laity 



60 



Daily Edition Vol. 5 No. 1 



National Assoc, of Annual Conference Lay Leaders 22405-01757-0 Dis- 
trict Board of Laity 

National Assoc, of Annual Conference Lay Leaders 22441LC-252.1-D 
Responsibilities of a Lay Leader 

National Assoc, of Annual Conference Lay Leaders 22443-LC-270.2-D 
Committee on Pastor-Parish Relations 

National Association of Annual Conf. Lay Leaders 20915-MN-NonDis-O 
The Order of Elder 

National Association of Korean-American United, Methodist Churches 
21731-CO-NonDis-0$ Executive Summary of Proposed Korean American 
Missionary Conference 

National UM Native American Center 22037-GM-NonDis-O$ National 
United Methodist Native American Center 

National Youth Ministry Organization 22660-GJ-NonDis-O Scheduling 
Board and Agency Meetings 

Native American Comprehensive Plan Task Force 22102-GM-NonDis-O 
Native American Comprehensive Plan Report and Recommendations 

Native American International Caucus of The UMC 22014-GM-NonDis- 
OS Native American Comprehesive Plan 

Native American International Caucus 21555-GJ-275.6-D General Provi- 
sions Regarding Churchwide Special Sundays with Offerings 

Native American International Caucus 22162-CO-507.3-D Assignment of 
a Bishop to Oversee The Native American Comprehensive Plan With the 
Church 

Native American International Caucus 22261-GJ-748-D Committee on 
Native American Ministry 

NCJ Town & Country & Urban Network Committees 20882-FA-723-D 
Basic Salary Plan 

NCJ Town & Country & Urban Network 20916-MN-532-D Community 
Context in Appointment Making 

NCJ Town & Country and Urban Network Committees 20893-GM-R157- 
U Basic Rural Worth 

NCJ Town & Country and Urban Network Committees 20917-GM-Non- 
Dis-0 Continuation of the Shalom Initiative 

NCJ Town & Country Assoc and Urban Network 20875-CO-702-D Vot- 
ing Rights for Clergy Members 

NCJ Town & Country Assoc. & Urban Network, Auburn, IN 20872-CO- 
38-C Election of Clergy Delegates to General and Jurisdictional or Central 
Conferences 

NCJ Town & Country Association Executive Committee 20877-D1-282-D 
Lay Preacher 

NCJ Town & Country, Urban Network Committees, and. United Meth- 
odist Rural Fellowship 20889-GJ-810.3-D Length ofService on General 
Church Boards and Agencies 

NCJ Town & County and Urban Network Committees 20894-GM-R204-U 
The Church's Response to Changing Rural Issues 

NCJ Urban Network + The N.A International Caucus +, National Urban 
Strategy Council 22291-GM-NonDis-O Holy Boldness: A National Plan 
for Urban Ministry 

NEB 20249-CO-NonDis-O Index to The Book of Discipline to show the 
membership/lay participation 

NEB 20251-DI-280-D Membership/Lay participation 

NEB 20252-D1-1202.1-D Incorporate Membership/Lay Paricipation 

NEB 20258-MN-454.1-D Regarding Joint Review Committee Evidence 

NEB 20263-CS-74-D The Political Community. Add H) Cultural Violence 

NEB 20266-Dl-NonDis-O Resolution for Spiritual Unity in Human Diversity 

NEB 20268-DI-68-D Thepresentchallenge to Theology in the Church 

NEB 2027(>FA-NonDis-O Comprehensive Protection Plan Contributions 

NEB 20275-GJ-NonDis-O Interim report on the findings and recommenda- 
tions of the Connectional Issues Study 

NEB 20278-MN-NonDis-O The Permanent Diaconate 

NEB 20520-DI-NonDis-O Receiving, Endorsing and Implementing the 
Bishop's Statement on Wisdom 

NEB 20749<;S-71-D Abortion 

NEN 20250-DI-NonDis-O Baptism and Confirmation: Amend the study "By 
Water and the Spirit." 

NEN 20253-lC-NonDis-O Pan-Methodist Approach 

New York Conference Board of Trustees, Port Washington, NY 22625- 
CO-703.7-D Organization of the Annual Conference 

NGA, NCA 20153-CS-71-D Revise the paragraph on Abortion 

NGA. WNC, SGA, EPA, WNY, SIN 20053-CS-71-D Human Sexuality 

NGA, WNC, 'WNY, SIN 20132-MN-402.2-D Retain Homosexuality State- 
ment in 402.2 

NGA 20154-Dl-NonDis-O Doctrinal Integrity 



NGA 20155<:S-R125-U Responsible Parenthood: Abortion 

NGA 20156-CS-NonDis-O Taxation Fairness 

NGA 20157-CS-NanDis-O Organizations Connected to Abortion Matters 

NGA 20158-GJ-NonDis-O Rationale for General Church restructuring 

NGA 20159-GJ-802.2-D General Provisions 

NGA 20160-GJ-803-D Definitions, Structures, and TiUes 

NGA 20161-GJ-805-D Nominations by Conferences 

NGA 20162-GJ-806-D Committee to Nominate additional Members 

NGA 20163-GJ-813-D General Secretary of General Program Agencies 

NGA 20164-GJ-814.6-D Provisions pertaining to staff 

NGA 20165-GJ-906 ID Fiscal Responsibilities 

NGA 20166-GJ-907.2-D Other Administrative responsibilities 

NGA 20167-GJ-911.2-D General budget policies 

NGA 20168-GJ-912-D The World Service Fund 

NGA 20169-GJ-913-D World Service Special Gifts 

NGA 20170-GJ-914.1-D The Advance 

NGA 20171-FA-922-D Missional Priority Fund 

NGA 20172-GJ-lOOl-D Name 

NGA 20173-GJ-1002-D Incorporation 

NGA 20174-GJ-10O3-D Amenability 

NGA 20175-GJ-1004-D Purpose 

NGA 20176-GJ-1005-D Objectives 

NGA 20177-GJ-1006-D Responsibilities 

NGA 20178-GJ-1007-D Organization and membership. Amend 1007 

NGA 20179-GJ-1221.4-D MembershipoftheCommitteeonOlderAdultMin- 
istries 

NGA 20180-GJ-1307.1-D Membershipofthe National Youth Ministry Organi- 
zation Steering Committee 

NGA 20181-GJ-1429-D Membership 

NGA 20183-GM-NonDis-OS Establish an Office on Hunger and a Hunger 
Challenge Fund 

NGA 20751-GJ-800-D$ Committee on Audit and Review 

NGR 20021-CC-NonDis-O$ Hausa translation of the Book of Discipline, the 
Book of Worship and the Hymnal 

NIL & NCJ AccessibiUty Advocates Association 21472-CO-747-D Annual 
Conference Committees on Disability Concerns 

NIL and NCJ Accessibility Associations 2I673-CO-NonDis-0 Jurisdic- 
tional Accessibility Advocates Association 

NIL Conf. and NCJ Accessibility Advocates Assoc. 21470-CO-703-D Ac- 
cessibility of Annual Conference Meetings 

NIL 20699-CS-R538-U Gun Violence 

NIL 20701-CS-71-D Human Sexuality 

NIL 20709-CO-608.2-D General Conference Petitions 

NIL 20715-FA-NonDis-O Voluntary Conversion Program fi-om MRPF to 
MPP 

NIL 20726-IC-NonDis-O Racism 

NIL 20727-IC-NonDis-O The Ecumenical Decade of The Churches in Soli- 
darity with Women 

NIL 20728-lC-NonDis-O In Support of Reparations for Afiican Americans 

NIL 20732-MN-NonDis-O Joint Inquiry Process for Ordained and Diaconal 
Ministries 

NIN 20923-CS-72-D The Social Community 

NIN 20952-DI-745.1-D Inclusion of a Council on Young Adult Ministries in 
the Annual Conference Structure 

NIN 20953-FA-NonDis-O Continuation of Enrollment in the Comprehensive 
Protection Plan as a Student Local Pastor 

NIN 20954-GJ-810.2-D Provisions pertaining to General Agency Member- 
ship 

NIN 20955-GJ-NonDis-O Granting of Advance Special status to Applachia 
Service Project, hic 

NIN 20959-MN-1529-D Specific Responsibilities of the Division of Ordained 
Ministry 

NMX 20407-CO-13O Meeting of General Conference 

NMX 20408-CO-15.15<; The Power of General Conference 

NMX 20409-CO-21-C Responsibility of General Conference 

NMX 204 10-CO-25C Power and Duties of Jurisdictional Conferences 

NMX 20411-CO-804.2-D Accountability of Receipts and Expendihires of 
Funds by all General Agencies 

NMX 20412-FA-711.3-D World Service and Conference Benevolence 

NMX 204I3-FA-712-D Apportionments 

NMX 20414-FA-712.4-D Conference Benevolences Apportionments 



April 16, 1996 



NMX 20415-FA-716.1-D Responsibility of a Local Church Treasurer 
NMX 20416-FA-906.1-D Fiscal Responsibilities 
NMX 20417-FA-910-D Definitionof "General Funds." 
NMX 20418-FA-911.5-D General PoUcies 
NMX 20419-FA-912-D The World Service Fund 

NMX 20420-FA-913.4-D Support of World Service and Conference Benevo- 
lence 
NMX 2(M21-GJ-802.3-D Evaluation of General Agencies 
NMX 20422-LC-248.14-D Responsibility of Distinct Superintendent 
NMX 20423-LC-2533.5-D Powers and Limitations of the Board of Trustees 
NMX 20424-LC-2534.1-D Permanent Endowment Fund Committee 
NMX 20425-LC-2535-D Local Church Foundations 
NMX 2(M26-MN-519-D Special responsibilities of Distinct Superintendent 
NMX 20427-CO-704.13-D Power and Authority of Annual Conference 
NMX 20428-CO-707-D Connectional relationship 
NMX 20429-CO-707.1-D Conference Agencies 
NMX 20430-CO-726-D Conference Council on Ministries 
NMX 20431-CO-726.2-D Membership 

NMX 20432-CO-726.3-D Officers of Conference Council on Ministiies 
NMX 20433-CO-726.4-D Executive Committee of the Conference Council on 

Ministries 
NMX 20434-CO-726.5-D Committees.Task Forces, and Consultations 
NMX 20435-CO-726.5-D Committee on Ethnic Local Church Concerns 
NMX 20436<;O-726.5-D Committee on Communications 
NMX 20437-CO-726.5-D Committee on Planning and Research 
NMX 20438-CO-726.5-D Committee on Evaluation 
NMX 20439-CO-726.6-D Age-level and Family Ministiies 
NMX 20440-CO-726.7-D Director 
NMX 20441-CO-726.-D Responsibilities 

NMX 20442-CO-726.5-D Committee on Publishing House Liaison 
NMX 20443-CS-728.1-D Conference Board of Church and Society 
NMX 20444-CS-728.2-D Membership of the Board of Church and Society 
NMX 20445-DI-729-D Conference Board of Discipleship 
NMX 20446-D1-730.1-D Conference Board of Laity 
NMX 20447-DI-730.4-D Chair of the Conference Board of Laity 
NMX 20448-DI-745.1-D Conference Council on Youth Minishy 
NMX 2(M49-DI-745.2-D Membership of Conference Council on Youth Minis- 

tiy 
NMX 20450-FA-746-D Joint Committee on Disability 
NMX 20451-GJ-748-D Annual Conference Committee on Native American 

Ministi-y 
NMX 20452-GM-73L1-D Annual Conference Board of Global Ministiies 
NMX 20453-GM-73L2-D Membership of the Conference Board of Global 

Ministry 
NMX 20454-GM-73L3-D Conference Secretary of Global Ministiies 
NMX 20455-GM-73LSD Committee on Parish and Community Develop- 
ment 
NMX 20456-GM-731.-D Membership of the Committee on Parish and Com- 
munity Development 
NMX 20457-HE-732.1-D Board of Higher Education and Campus MinistiT 
NMX 20458-HE-732.3-D Chairperson of the Board of Higher Education and 

Campus Ministry 
NMX 20459-IC-738. 1-D Commission on Archives and History 
NMX 20460-IC-739. 1-D Conference Commission or Committee on Christian 

Unity and Interreligious Concerns 
NMX 20461-IC-739.2-D Membership of the Committee on Christian Unity 

and Interreligious Concerns 
NMX 20462-IC-740.1-D Conference Commission on Religion and Race 
NMX 20463-IC-740.2-D Basic membership of the Commission on Religion 

and Race 
NMX 20464-IC-741-D Conference Commission of the Status and Role of 

Women 
NMX 20465-IC-741,2-D Membership of the Commission on the Status and 

Role of Women 
NMX 20466-1C-741.3-D Chairperson of the Commission on the Stahis and 

Role of Women 
NMX 20467-MN-733.1-D Membership of Conference Board of Ordained 

Ministry 
NMX 20468-MN-733.1-D Membership of the Board of Ordained Ministry 
NMX 20469-MN-734.1-D Membership of the Board of Diaconal MinishT 



NMX 20470-MN-735.1-D Conference Committee on Episcopacy 
NMX 20471-MN-735.2-D Conference Committee on Episcopacy 
NMX 20547-GJ-NonDis-O Support Efforts to Provide Economic Develop- 
ment for Native Americans 
NMX 21556-GJ-NonDis-O General Council on Ministiies 
NNJ 2(XX)9-CS-728-D Conference Board of Church and Society 
NNJ 20035-MN-NonDis-O Support the ordination of persons called into min- 
istry 
NNJ 20043-MN-424.3-D Educational requirements for Pastors 
NNJ 20075-MN-2625.3-D Investigation procedures 
NNJ 20139-MN-454.1-D Grievance Procedures 
NNJ 20141-MN-454.1-D Grievance Procedures 
NNJ 20237-GJ-NonDis-O Annual AIDS Awareness Sunday 
NNJ 20489-CO-707-D The Sbucture of Annual Conference 
NNJ 20490-CO-726-D Conference Council on Ministiies 
NNJ 20491-CO-726.5-D Committees, Task Force, and Consultations 
NNJ 20493-DI-729-D Conference Board of Discipleship 
NNJ 20494-DI-73O-D Conference Board of Laity 
NNJ 20495-DI-744-D United Methodist Men 
NNJ 20496-DI-745-D Conference Council on Youth Ministry 
NNJ 20497-FA-708-D Conference Council on Finance and Administi^tion 
NNJ 20498-FA-722-D Commission on Equitable Salary 
NNJ 20500-FA-737-D Conference Board of Pensions 
NNJ 20501-FA-746-D Conference Joint Committee on Disability 
NNJ 20502-GJ-748-D Conference Committee on Native American Ministiy 
NNJ 20503-GM-731-D Conference Board of Global Ministiies 
NNJ 20504-GM-743-D United Methodist Women 
NNJ 20505-HE-732-D Conference Board of Higher Education and Campus 

Ministry 
NNJ 20507-IC-738-D Conference Commission on Archives and History 
NNJ 20508-IC-739-D Conference Commission on Christian Unity and Inter- 
religious Concerns 
NNJ 20509-IC-740-D Conference Commission on Religion and Race 
NNJ 20510-IC-741-D Conference Commission on the Stattis and Role of 

Women 
NNJ 20511-MN-733-D Conference Board of Ordained Ministir 
NNJ 20512-MN-734-D Conference Board of Diaconal Ministiy 
NNJ 205I3-MN-735-D Conference Committee on Episcopacy 
NNY 20697-CS-NonDis-O The Promised Financial Aid to the Palestinians 
NNY 20698<;S-NonDis-O The Building of Settlements in the Occupied Ter- 
ritories 
NNY 20713-FA-NonDis-O Disabled Pastors 
NNY 20746-CS-NonDis-O Jerusalem 
North Alabama Conference Board of Laity, NAL 22737-DI-278-D Lay 

Speaking 
North Alabama Conference Board of Laity, NAL 22738-D1-278-D Lay 

Speaking 
North Alabama Conference Board of Laity 22739-D1-279-D Local Church 

Lay Speaker 
North Alabama Conference Board of Laity 22740-DI-28O-D Certified Lay 

Speaker 
North Alabama Conference Board of Laity 22741-DI-281-D Transfer of 

Certification by Certified Lay Speakers 
North C, South C, and Southeastern Jurisdictions 22361-GJ-805. 1-D 

General Agency Membership 
Nouwen, Bob, Jr., Tanner Williams UMC, MobUe, AL, 22886^S71-D 

Abortion 
NTX 20342-LC-244-D Organization and administi^tion of the local church 
NTX 20343-LC-245-D Basic organizing plan for the local church 
NTX 20344-LC-253.1-D The Administtative Council 
NTX 20347-LC-256-D Organization of the Administi^tive Board 
NTX 20348-LC-257-D Responsibilitiesof the Administi^tive Board 
NTX 20349-U:-258-D Responsibilitiesof the Council on Ministiies 
NTX 20350-LC-259-D Basic membership of the Council on Ministiies 
NTX 20351-LC-260-D Age-level, family, and specialized ministries 
NTX 20352-LC-261-D Work Areas 
NTX 20355-LC-264.1-D Program Agencies 
NTX 20473-CO-701-D The Purpose of the Annual Conference 
NTX 20474-CO-707.1-D ResponsibiUties of the Annual Conference 
NTX 20475-CO-726-D Annual Conference Council on Ministiies 



52 



Daily Edition Vol. 5 No. 1 



GCCUIC 21103-MN-443-D Clergy in Ap|)ointment Beyond the Local United 

Methodist Church 
GCCUIC 21104-MN-443.1-D Appointments within the Connectional Struc- 
tures of United Methodism 
GCCUIC 2U05-MN-i43.1D Appointments to Ministries in Ecumenical Set- 
tings 
GCCUIC 21106-MN-443.4-D Special Ecumenical AffiUation 
GCCUIC 21107-MN-519-D Specific Responsibilities of District Superinten- 
dents 
GCCUIC 21108-MN-524.2-D Program Responsibilities of the District Super- 
intendent 
GCCUIC 21109-MN-529.6-D The Cabinets Responsibility in United Method- 
ist presence in Ecumenical Shared Ministries 
GCCUIC 21110-MN-530.1-D Responsibility in Appointment Making 
GCFA, GCOM 21559-FA-709.2-D Membership of the Annual Conference 

Council on Fmance and Administration 
GCFA, GCOM 21562-FA-711-D Budgets 
GCFA, GCOM 21563-FA-7U.5-D Budget Revisions 
GCFA, GCOM 21566-FA-722.8-D Equitable Compensation 
GCFA, GCOM 21567-FA-722.11-D Equitable Compensation 
GCFA, GCOM 21569-FA-905.1-D Organization 
GCFA, GCOM 21576-FA-906.10-D fiscal ResponsibiUties 
GCFA, GCOM 21593<JJ-816-D Policies Relative to Socially Responsible In- 
vestments 
GCFA, GCOM 21594-GJ-821-D Meetings 
GCFA 21111 FA-NonDis-O World Service Fund 
GCFA 21112-FA-NonDis-O Ministerial Education Fund 
GCFA 21113-FA-NonDis^ Bbck College Fund 
GCFA 21114-FA-NonDisO Africa University Fund 
GCFA 21115-FA-NonDisO Episcopal Fund 
GCFA 21116-FA-NonDis-O General Administration Fund 
GCFA 21117-FA-NonDis-O Interdenominational Cooperation Fund 
GCFA 21118-FA-NonDis-O Apportionment Formulas 
GCFA 21119-FA-NonDisO Special Sundays With Offerings 
GCFA 21 120-FA-NonDis-O Directives for the Administration of the General 

Funds 
GCFA 21121-FA-NonDis-O References from Previous General Conferences 
GCFA 21122-FA-NonDisO Budget of the General Council on Fmance and 

Administration 
GCFA 21123-FA-NonDis-O Other Reports and Recommendations 
GCFA 21124-FA-NonDis-O Reports and Recommendations presented With 

Other General Agencies 
GCFA 21558-CO-608.4-D Petitions to General Conference 
GCFA 21560-FA-710.1-D Responsibilities of the Annual Conference Council 

on Fmance and Administration 
GCFA 21561-FA-710.7-D Relationships 

GCFA 21564-FA-714.2-D Authority and Responsibility of the Annual Confer- 
ence Council on Fmance and Administration 
GCFA 21565-FA-716.1-D Conference Treasurer/Director of Administi^tive 

Services 
GCFA 21568-FA-724-D Pastors' Expenses and Allowances 
GCFA 21570-FA-905 4-D Committee on Audit and Review 
GCFA 21571-FA-905.5-D Staff 
GCFA 21572-FA-906.3^D fiscal Responsibilities 
GCFA 21573-FA-906.4-D fiscal ResponsibiUties 
GCFA 21574-FA-906.5-D fiscal Responsibilities 
GCFA 21575-FA-906.6-D fiscal ResponsibiUties 
GCFA 21577-FA-907-D Other AdminisQ^tive ResponsibiUties 
GCFA 21578-FA-907.7-D Other Administi^tive ResiwnsibiUties 
GCFA 21579-FA-907.8-D Other Administi-ative ResponsibiUties 
GCFA 21580-FA-907.13-D Other Administi^tive RcsimnsibiUties 
GCFA 21581-FA-907.14-D Other Administrative ResponsibiUties 
GCFA 21582-FA-907.15-D Other Administi^tive ResponsibiUties 
GCFA 21583-FA-909-D ResponsibiUties of the Treasurer 
GCFA 21584-FA-910-D Definition of "General Funds" 
GCFA 21585-FA-911.1-D General PoUcies 
GCFA 21586-FA-9112-D General Policies 
GCFA 21587-FA-911.3-D General PoUcles 
GCFA 21589-FA-2503-D Trust Clauses in Deeds 
GCFA 21590-FA-2503.5-D Trust Clauses in Deeds 



GCFA 21591-FA-2512-D The Methodist Corporation 

GCFA 21592-GJ-8U.3-D Provisions Pertaining to Staff 

GCFA 21595-LC-114-D Employment Status of Clergy 

GCFA 21596-LC-262.10-D The Chairperson of Stewardship 

GCFA 21597-IjC-2525-D Local Church Board of Trustees— Qualifications 

GCFA 21598-LC-2533.1-D Board of Trustees-Powers and Limitations 

GCFA 21599-U;-2534-D Planned Giving and Endowments Committee 

GCFA 216(X)-LC-2534.4-D Permanent Endowment Fund Committee 

GCFA 21601-LC-2534-D Resources 

GCFA 21602-GJ-513.5-D Complaints 

GCFA 21603-MN-523.5-D Administration 

GCOM 21609CO*02-D Composition of The General Conference 

GCOM 21610CO«)4 ID Election of Secretary-Designate 

GCOM 21611-CO-605-D ResponsibiUties of the Secretary-Designate 

GCOM 21612-CO-608.2-D Petitions to General Conference 

GCOM 21613CO-612-D Interjurisdictional Committee on Episcopacy 

GCOM 21614<;0-624-D The Jurisdictional Conference 

GCOM 2161SCO-702-D Composition and Character 

GCOM 21616<;O-705.3-D Business of the Conference 

GCOM 21617-CO-707-D Conference Agencies 

GCOM 21618<;0-72frD Annual Conference Council on Ministiies 

GCOM 21619-D1-282-D Uy Missioners 

GCOM 21620-DI-729-D Conference Board of Discipleship 

GCOM 21621-DI-751.4-D ResponsibiUty of the Distiict Lay Leader 

GCOM 21622-DI-758.2-D Distt-ict Committee on Lay Speaking 

GCOM 21623-FA-708-D Conference Council on finance and Administi^tion 

GCOM 21624CO-700-D Conference Commission on Conraiunication 

GCOM 21625-FA-716-D Conference Treasurer/Director of Administrative 

Services 
GCOM 21626-FA-722-D Equitable Compensation 
GCOM 21627-FA-736.2-D Episcopal Residence Conunittee 
GCOM 21628-FA-737-D Conference Board of Pensions 
GCOM 21629-FA-746-D Joint Committee on DIsabiUty 
GCOM 21630-FA-1702-D Organization of the General Board of PubUcation 
GCOM 21631-D1-730.1-D Conference Board of Laity 

GCOM 21632-CS-728.1-D Board of Church and Society 

GCOM 21633<iJ-274-D Special Sundays 

GCOM 21634-GJ-275-D General Provisions Regarding Churchwide Special 
Sundays With Offerings 

GCOM 21635-GJ-277-D Three Special Sundays 

GCOM 21636-LC-lOlD The Churches 

GCOM 21637-LC-102-D The Churches 

GCOM 21638-LC-103-D The Churches 

GCOM 21639-LC-103-D The General Ministry of All Christian BeUevers 

GCOM 21640-LC-107-D The General Ministry of All Christian BeUevers 

GCOM 21641-LC-112-D Thejoumey of a Connectional People 

GCOM 21642-LC-113-D CaUed to Inclusivcness 

GCOM 21643-LC-245-D Local Church Organization and Administtation 

GCOM 21644-LC-248-D The Local Church Historian 

GCOM 21645-MN-524-D ResponsibiUties of the Distiict Superintendent 

GCOM 2164&CO-NonDisO Persons with DisabiUties 

GCOM 21647-CS-1106-D Organization of the General Board of Church and 
Society 

GCOM 21648-D1-1204-D Organization of the General Board of Discipleship 

GCOM 21649-GJ-748-D Annual Conference Committee on Native American 
Ministiy 

GCOM 2165(KlJ-802.4-D AmenabiUty and Program AccounlabiUty 

GCOM 21651-GJ-803-D Definitions. StiTJChircs, and Titles 

GCOM 21652-GJ-805.2-D Other Members 

GCOM 21653-MN-734.1-D Conference Board of Diaconal Ministry 

GCOM 21654-GJ-805-D General Agency Membership 

GCOM 21655<;j-810.2-D Provisions Pertaining to General Agency Member- 
ship 

GCOM 21656-GJ-812-D Vacancies 

GCOM 21657-GJ-S14.10-D Provisions Pertaining to Staff 

GCOM 2I658-GJ-1006.6-D ResponsibiUties of the General Council on Minis- 
tries 

GCOM 21659-GJ1007-D Membership of the General Council on Ministiies 

GCOM 21660GM-731-D Conference Board of Global Ministries 



April 16, 1996 



53 



GCOM 21662-HE-732-D Conference Board of Higher Education and Cam- 
pus Ministry 
GCOM 21663-HE-1507-D Organization of the General Board of Higher Edu- 
cation and Ministry 
GCOM 21664-IC-738.1-D Conference Commission on Archives and History 
GCOM 21665-IC-739.1-D Conference Commission on Christian Unity and 

Interreligious Concerns 
GCOM 21666-IC-740.1-D Conference Commission on Religion and Race 
GCOM 21667-IC-741-D Conference Commission on the Status and Role of 

Women 
GCOM 21668-IC-1907.1-D Membership of the General Commission on Com- 
munications 
GCOM 21669-1C-2006-D Membership of the General Commission on Chris- 
tian Unity and Interreligious Concerns 
GCOM 21670-IC-2103-D Membership of the Commission on Religion and 

Race 
GCOM 21671-IC-2204-D Membership of the Commission on the Status and 

Role of Women 
GCOM 2 1672-M N-733. 1-D Conference Board of Ordained Ministiy 
GCOM 21675-GJ-NonDis-O GCOM Quadrennial Report 
GCOM 21676-GJ-NonDis-OS Connectional Issues Shidy 
GCOM 21677-GJ-NonDis-0$ Sti-engthening the Black Church 
GCOM 21678-GJ-NonDis-OS A Shared Mission Focus 
GCOM 21679-GJ-NonDis-O Resolutions on Special Sundays 
GCOM 21680-GJ-NonDis-O Mission and Ministi^- in Alaska 
GCOM 21681-GJ-NonDis-O Prison Ministry/Prison Reform 
GCOM 21682-GJ-NonDis-O Spanish Language Resources 
GCOM 21683-GJ-NonDis-O The Book of Resolution 
GCOM 21684-GJ-NonDis-O Churches' Center for Theology and PubUc Pol- 
icy 
GCOM 21685-GJ-NonDis-O World Service Special Gifts Program 
GCOM 21686-GJ-NonDis-O Peace With Justice Special Program 
GCOM 21687-GJ-NonDis-O Evaluation of the General Program-Related 

Agencies, Etc. 
GCOM 21688^GJ-NonDis-0 National Plan for Hispanic Ministiies 
GCOM 21689-GJ-NonDis-O Ethnic Local Church Concerns Committee 
GCOM 21690-GJ-NonDis-O Advance for Christ and His Church 
GCOM 21691-GJ-NonDis-O Evaluation of GCOM 
GCOM 21692-GJ-NonDis-O Interagency Task Force on Legislation 
GCOM 21693-GJ-NonDis-O Implementation of Theme 
GCOM 21694-GJ-NonDis-O Implementation of Special Programs 
GCOM 21695-GJ-NonDis-O Process for Developing Theme. Missional Pri- 
orities & Special Programs 
GCOM 21696-GJ-NonDis-O Priority on Crisis in the Cities 
GCOM 21697-GJ-NonDis-O Reclaiming the Cities 
GCOM 21698-GJ-NonDis-O Response to Refugee Crisis 
GCOM 21699-GJ-NonDis-O Grants from the World Service Contingency 

Fund 
GCOM 21700-GJ-NonDis-O Environmental Racism 
GCOM 21701-GJ-NonDis-O Sti-engthening the Small Membership Church 
GCOM 21702-GJ-NonDis-O The Natural World 
GCOM 21703-GJ-NonDis-O New Developments in Genetic Science 
GCOM 21704-GJ-NonDis-O Developing Congregations for Deaf Ministries 
GCOM 21705-GJ-NonDis-O Assessment of Sexual Harassment 
GCOM 21706-GJ-NonDis-O Training Events for New Distiict Superinten- 
dents and Conference Council Directors 
GCOM 21707-GJ-NonDis-O Joint Training Events 
GCOM 21708-GJ-NonDis-O Telecommunications and Centi^al Ordering 
(;COM 21709-GJ-NonDis-O Biblical & Theological Language 
GCOM 21710-GJ-NonDis-O Racial Harassment Policy 
GCOM 21711-GJNonDis-O Native American Center 
GCOM 21712-GJ-NonDis-O Use of Name and Insignia 
GCOM 21713-GJ-NonDis-O General Agency Headquarters/Staff Location 
GCOM 21714-GJ-NonDis-O Needs of the General Program Agencies from 

the World Service Fund 
GCOM 21715-GJ-NonDis-O GCOM Requested World Service Allocations to 

Program Agencies 
GCOM 2171frGJ-NonDis-0 Mission and Aging in a Global Population 



GCORR 20964-DI-1307-D Membership of the National Youth Ministry Or- 
ganization Steering Committee 

GCORR 20966-IC-2108.2-D ResponsibiUty of the General Commission on 
Religion and Race 

GCORR 20967-IC-2108.21-D ResponsibiUty of the General Commission on 
Religion and Race 

GCORR 20968-IC-NonDis-O 1992 General Conference Referral-Member- 
ship in Supremacist Groups 

GCORR 20969-IC-R159-U Affirmative Action 

GCORR 20971-IC-NonDis-O Racism in Rural Areas Task Force Report 

GCORR 21035-DI-1306.2-D Voting Membership of National Youth Ministry 
Organization Steering Committee 

GCORR 21604-IC-R248-U EUmination of Racism in The United Methodist 
Church 

GCORR 21605-1C-R256-U Global Racism 

GCORR 21606-IC-R346-U A Program to Emphasize Inclusiveness in All Di- 
mensions of the Church 

GCSRW 20848-CS-71-D Sexual Harassment 

GCSRW 20849-IC-2203-D Responsibility of the General Commission on the 
Status and Role of Women 

GCSRW 20850-IC-2203.7-D AdvocacyroleoftheGeneralCommissiononthe 
Status and Role of Women 

GCSRW 20851-MN-NonDis-O Sexual Abuse Within the Ministerial Relation- 
ship and Sexual Harassment Within the UM Church 

GCSRW 20852-MN-313-D Family Leave 

General Commission on Central Conference Affairs, 23023-CC-NonDis-O 
Episcopal Oversight in the Commonwealth of Independent States 

General and Jurisdictional Delegation, Florida Annual Conference, 
Leesburg, FL 20733-MN-NonDis-O Mandatory Retirement Age for 
Clergy, Bishops and other Church Employees 

General Commission on Central Conference Affairs 22013-CC-NonDis-O 
Zaire to Become a Centi-al Conference 

George R. Rhoads, Rogers, ARK 21017-LC-2539-D Incorporated Local 
Church Property - Notice and Authorization 

Gibson, James A. m, SGA 22332-CS-1104-D The Responsibilities of the 
General Board of Church and Society 

Gibson, James A. Ill, SGA 22333-CS-1104-D The Responsibilities of the 
General Board of Church and Society 

Gibson, James A. in, SGA 22334-CS-1104-D Responsibilities of tile Gen- 
eral Board of Church and Society 

Gibson, James A. m, SGA 22335-CS-1104-D Responsibilities of the Gen- 
eral Board of Church and Society 

Gibson, James A.III, SGA 21539-GJ-816-D PoUcies ReUtive to Socially 
Responsible Investinents 

GJ 20540-GJ-NonDis-O$ REPORT: Site Selection Task Force for GBGM 

Gooding, Dick, Calvary United Methodist Church, Sherrodsville, OH 
20786-Dl-NonDis-O Baptism Shidy 

Gregg, Odie, Hartselle UMC, Hartselle, AL 22164-CO-602-D Composi- 
tion of The General Conference 

Gregg, Odie, Hartselle United Methodist Church, Hartselle, AL 20797- 
GJ-4-C Inclusiveness of the Church 

Gregg, Odie, United Methodist Church of Hartselle, Hartselle, AL 
20778-CO-I3-C Meeting of the General Conference 

Gregg, Odie, United Methodist Church of Hartselle, Hartselle, AL 
20779-CO-14-C Tlie Res|X)nsibility of General Conference 

Griffith, Thomas H. , CAP 22560-FA-2516-D Sale, Transfer, Lease or Mort- 
gage of Annual Conference Property 

Griffith, Thomas H., CAP 22561-FA-2518.2-D Mortgage of Sale of Real 
Property by a District Board of Trustees 

Griffith, Thomas H., CAP 22564-FA-NonDis-O Plan Document forthe Min- 
isterial Pension Plan 

Griffith, Thomas H., CAP 22565-FA-NonDis^ Plan Document of the Min- 
isterial Pension Plan 

Griffith. Thomas H., CAP 22574-LC-257.3-D ResponsibiUties of the Admin- 
isti-ative Board 

Griffith, Thomas H., CAP 22596-MN-448.1-D Leave of Absence 

Griffith, Thomas H., CAP 22597-MN-454.1-D Grievance Procetlures 

Griffith, Thomas H., CAP 22598MN-)54.3-D Recommendation to Admin- 
istrative Location 

Griffith, Thomas H., CAP 22605-MN-2618-D Statement of Information by 
the Judicial Council 

Griffith, Thomas H., CAP 22606-MN-2622.3-D Fair Process 

Griffith, Thomas H., CAP 22607-MN-2623.1-D Additional Chargeable Of- 



64 



Daily Edition Vol. 5 No. 1 



SNJ 20010-CS1113.1-D Election of General Secretary of General Board of 

Church and Society 
SNJ 20027-CS-NonDis-O AmendmenttotheConstitutionoftheUnitedSlatcs 

of America 
SNJ 20137-MN-402.2-D Persons practicing homosexuality 
SNJ 20543-CO-702-D Clergy Membership of Annual Conference 
SNJ 20544-CO-726-D Conference Council on Ministries 
SNJ 20545CO-726-D Program Coordinator 
SNJ 20546-DM205.5-D Unit Staff 
SNJ 20548-GJ-813-D Election of General Secretaries of General Program 

Agencies 
SNJ 20549-GM-1409-D Board Staff 
SNJ 20550-HE-1506.2-D ResponsibilitiesoftheGeneralBoardofHigherEdu- 

cation and Ministry 
SNJ 20551-IC-2005.6-D Organization 
SNJ 20552-1C-2106-D Staff 
SNJ 20553-IC-2208-D Staff 

SNJ 20554-IjC-230-D Tune Umit for Inactive Members 
SNJ 20569-GJ-100I-D$ Name 
SNJ 20574-GJ-1006-D Responsibilities 
SNJ 20575-GJ-1007-D Organization and Membership 
SNJ 20576-GJ-1007-D Organization 

Solwell, Joe, NCA 22864-CS-llOl-D General Board of Church and Society 
South Georgia Conference United Methodist Men, SGA 20881-DI-1223-D 

Men's Division 
Southeastern Jurisdictional Conference 20874-CO-602D Composition of 

General Conference 
Southwest Texas Conference United Methodist Women, STO 20891-GM- 

NonDis-O The Authority of the Women's Division 
SoweU,JoeH.,SCA 22805-IC-2101-D General Commission on Religion and 

Race 
Spady, R. + Cate, Wm. & Jan + Ellington, Wm. +, Harding, Joe + Adm. 

C. & Members St. Peters UMC, Seattle, WA 22717IC-NonDisO Es- 
tablish a Steering Committee to study the new "Fast Forum" 
Spady, R.+ Cate, Wm. & Jan, + Ellington, + Hardingjoe + 40 Lay 

Members & Adm C. St. Peters UMC, Seattle, WA 22705-CO-610-D 

Speaking for the Church 
Spencer, Gordon, OKL 22075-MN-439.1-D Responsibilities and Duties of 

a Pastor 
Stabler, L. Vastine Jr., Highlands UMC, Birmingham, AL 22602-MN- 

733-D Conference Board of Ordained Minishr 
Staff-Parish Relations Committee, Euclid Avenue UMC, Oak Park, IL 

22851-MN-533-D Process of Appointment Making 
Staff/Parish Relations Committee, Euclid Avenue UMC, Oak Park, IL 

22848-MN-531-D Appointinent Making 
Stafford, Unda E., WOH 22530-LC-230.1-D Membership in the United 

Methodist Church 
Stafford, Unda E., WOH 22595-MN439.1-D United Methodist Ministers 

acting as Agents for die State 
Steel, Darlene + 6 other individuals, Fairview UMC, Texarkana, AR 

22455-GJ-NonDis-O Exit Procedures for Persons in Leadership Positions 

that Profess to be Homosexuals 
Sterling/Algler Charge Conference, Alger, MI 22484^GJ-NonDis-0 Re- 
sponsibilities of the General Council on Ministiies regarding Staff 
Stockholm UMC, Stockholm, NJ 22749-DI-NonDisO National Day of 

Prayer 
Stoner, Nadine, First UMC, Beloit, WI 22620-CS-NonDis-O Land Value 

Taxation 
STX 20267-D1-68-D Our Theological Task 
Sunday School Class, First UMC, SedaUa, MO 22498-CS-71-D Rights of 

Homosexual Persons 
Sunday S. Class, 1 Adm. Council & Peace w/Justice, Church of the 

Redeemer and 2 Others, Cleveland Heights, OH, 22877-CS-71-D 

Human Sexuality 
Sunshine DCOM of the RKM, Bculah, CO, 23025-CO-702.2-D Consistency 

in Responsibilities & Privileges of Ordained and Local Pastors 
SunshineDCOMofRKM, Beulah, CO, 23029 MN-406.7-D Consistency in 

Responsibilities & Privileges of Ordained and Local Pastors 
SunshineDCOMofRKM, Beulah, CO, 23035-MN-t40.5-D Consistency in 

Responsibilities & Privileges of Ordained and Local Pastors 
Sutton, Letha ♦ 28 Other Individuals, Fairview UMC, Texarkana, AR 

22257-FA-NonDis-O Implementation of "Voluntary" Apportionments 
Swantner, M. Thomas, CIL 21530-MN-513.5-D Complaints Prepared by 
the Review Committee 



Swift, Clyde N. and 8 other Individuals, NAK 22036-IC-NonDis-O To 
Withdraw Membership from the National Coalition Against Censorship 

Szpak, Michael, BMW 22488-GM-NonDis-O Opposition to the Deportation 
of Salvadoran Refugees from the United States 

Tagg, Lawrence V., IWA 22789-H&NonDis-0 PoUcy of the Division of 
Chaplains and Related Ministi-ies 

Talbott, Norbert L., Epworth UMC, Indianapolis, IN 22070-MN-436-D 
Ordained Ministry 

TEN 21607-CO-702.1-D Composition and Character 

TEN 21608-CO-702.2-D Composition and Character 

TEN 22194-CO-NonDis-O AUow Part-Tune and Student Pastors to Vote at 
Annual Conference 

TEN 22267-GJ-NonDisO Similarities and Uniformity of StiTicture 

Tenn. Annual Conference Board of Diaconal Ministry, 22914-MN-319-D 
FYobationary Service of a Deacon 

Tenn. Conference Board of Diaconal Ministry and Diaconal Ministry 
Clearness Committee, 22913-MN-318-D The Ordained Deacon 

Tenn. Conference Board of Diaconal Ministry, 22915-MN-320-D Eligibility 
and Rights of Probationary Members 

Tennessee Conference Board of Diaconal Ministry, 22912-MN-317-D 
Qualifications for Ordination as a Deacon 

Tennessee Conference Board of Diaconal Ministry, 22917-MN-422-D 
Members in Full Connections 

Tennessee Conference Board of Diaconal Ministry, 22916-MN-322-D 
Requirements for Admission of Ordination to Deacon 

Tennessee Conference Board of Diaconal Ministry, 22969-MN-324-D 
Ministry of an Elder 

Temeus, John L., UMC, Yukon, OK 22642GJ-NonDis-0 Annual Confer- 
ence Church Membership on General Boards and Agencies 

Temeus, John, UMC, Yukon, OK 22637-FA-NonDis-O Reporting of 
Funds of General Boards, Agencies and Committees 

Temeus, John, UMC, Yukon, OK 22644-GM-NonDis-O Concern for 
North Korea 

Temeus.John, UMC, Yukon, OK 22645-GM-NonDis-O ConcemforCuba 

Temeus, John, Yukon UMC, Yukon, OK 20975-CS-71-DS Membership 
of Homosexual Study Committee 

Temeus, John, Yukon UMC, Yukon, OK 21011-GJ-2400-D$ Offices of 
General Agencies, Boards, Commissions, Councils and Organizations 

Temeus, John, Yukon UMC, Yukon, OK 21014-1C-2302-DS General 
Commission on the Status and Role of Conservatives 

Temeus, John, Yukon UMC, Yukon, OK 21015-IC-2303-D$ General 
Commission on Alcohol, Tobacco, and Drugs in the United Methodist 
Church 

Temeus, John, Yukon UMC, Yukon, OK 22611-CS-71-D Human Sexual- 
ity 

Temeus, John, Yukon, OK 22615-CS-74-D Military Service 

Temeus, John, Yukon, OK 22694-MN-423.2-D Rights and Responsibilities 
of Members 

TEX 20104-LC-2534.5-D Permanent Endowment Fund Committee 

TEX 20124-DI-68-D The present challenge to Theology in the Church 

TEX 20521-FA-NonDis-OS General Council on Finance and Adminish^tion 

TEX 20961-CO-14-C Ratio of Representatives in General, Cenh-al, Jurisdic- 
tional Conferences fi-om Conferences 

TEX 20962-CO-602.2-D Composition of the General Conference 

TEX 20963-CO-602.3-D Delegates to General Conference by Annual Confer- 
ences 

TEX 20965-GJ-4-C Inclusiveness of die Church 

The Council of Bishops, General Commission on. Central Conference 
Affairs 21727-CC-NonDis-O Continuation of the Eurasia Episcopal Area 

The Council of Bishops 21719-CO-NonDis-OS The Global Nahire of The 
Church 

The Council of Bishops 21720-CO-505-D Bishops in Jurisdictions 

The Council of Bishops 21721-CO-660.1-D Organization of a Missionary 
Conference 

The Council of Bishops 2172SMN-NonDis-0 Covenanting Relationships 
with Spain and West Africa 

The Council of Bishops 21732-MN-2623.1-D Chargeable Offenses 

The National Committee on Deaf Ministry 22090-MN-530.2-D Appoint- 
ment-Making Across Conference Lines 
The National Committee on Deaf Ministry 223I8-CS-72-D Rights of Per- 
sons with Special Needs 



April 16, 1996 



65 



The Native American International Caucus of The, United Methodist 
Church 2229S-GM-NonDis-0$ National Plan for Hispanic Ministries 

The Student Forum of The United Methodist Church 22274HE-1519 4-D 
Requirements for Church Affiliation in Institutions of Higher Education 

Thompson, Carol, OKI 22576-LC-270.2-D Pastor-Parish Relations Conunit- 
tee and the Lay Preacher 

Thurman, Gary L., First UMC, Midland, TX 22535-CS-71-D The Nurtur- 
ing Community 

Thurman, Gary L., First UMC, Midland, TX 2253frCS-72-D The Social 
Community 

Thurman. Gary U, First UMC. Midland, TX 22537-CS-73-D The Eco- 
nomic Community 

Thurman, Gary L.,Fu^t UMC, Midland, TX 22538-CS-74-D ThePoliUcal 
Community 

Thurman, Gary L,, First UMC, Midland, TX 22539-CS-75-D The World 
Community 

Thurman, Gary L., Fu^t UMC, Midland, TX 2254(K;S76-D Our Social 
Creed 

Thurman, Gary L., First UMC, Midland, TX 22541-CS-llOl-D General 
Board of Church and Society 

Thurman, Gary L., First UMC. Midland. TX 22542-CS-1102-D The Pur- 
pose of the General Board of Church and Society 

Thurman, Gary L., First UMC, Midland, TX 22543-CS-1103-D The Ob- 
jectives of the General Board of Church and Society 

Thurman, Gary L., First UMC, Midland. TX 22544-CS-1106-D The Or- 
ganization of the General Board of Church and Society 

Thurman, Gary L., First UMC. Midland. TX 22545-CS-1107-D Filling 
Vacancies on the General Board of Church and Society 

Thurman, Gary L., First UMC, Midland, TX 22547-CS-l 110-D Meetings 
of the General Board of Church and Society 

Thurman, Gary L,. First UMC. Midland. TX 22548-CS-1114-D Headquar- 
ters of the General Board of Church and Society 

Thurman, Gary L, First UMC, Midland, TX 22549-LC-248.2-D Powers 
and Duties of the Charge Conference 

Thurman, Gary L., First UMC. Midland, TX 2255O-LC-270.1-D Commit- 
tee on Nominations and Personnel 

Thurman, Gary L., First UMC, Midland, TX 22551-MN-515,5-D Mutual 
Accountability of Bishops with District Superintendents 

Thurman, Gary L., First UMC, Midland, TX 22552-MN-517D ElecUon 
of District Superintendents 

Thurman, Gary L., First UMC, Midland, TX 22553-MN-518-D Term of 
District Superintendents 

Thurman; Gary L., First UMC, Midland, TX 22554-MN-534-D Tenure in 
Local Church Appointments 

Thurman, Gary, First UMC, Midland, TX 22534-CS-70-D Social Princi- 
ples 

Thurman, Randy L., First UMC, Midland. TX 22546^S-1109-D Mem- 
bership of the Executive Committee of the General Board of Church and 
Society 

Tippit, Stephen L.. Union UMC. BeUeviUe. IL 22808^1C-NonDis-O Real- 
izing Unity Between Lutherans and Methodists 

Tippit, Stephen L., United Methodist Church of Belleville, IL, Mascou- 
tah, IL 22628-Dl-NonDis-O Recovering the Centrality of the Eucharist 

TRY, NEB, NIL, WMI, NYK 20519-Dl-NonDis-O Affirming Our Theologi- 
cal Task 



TRY. PNW 20517-GJ-NonDis-O Location of the General Board of Global 
Ministiies 

Try 20O42-MN-420.1-D Elimination of category of associate member 

TRY 20108-DI-1306-D Voting members of National Youth Ministry Organiza- 
tion Restrictions 

TRY 20152-MN-406-D Local Pastors: Authority and Duties 

TRY 20197-Cai5.1(K; Amendment to the Constitution 

TRY 20198<;a35<: Amendment to the Constitution 

TRY 2020<K;a505-D Number of Bishops 

TRY 20207-GJ-NonDis-O Size of General Boards 

TRY 20219-GM-NonDis-O Teens at Risk 

U.M Task Force on Developmental DisabiUties 22317-CS-72-D Rightsof 
Persons with Handicapping Conditions 

U.M. Task Force on Developmental Disabilities 22260-GJ-277D Relat- 
ing to Disability Awareness Sunday 



UM Task Force on Developmental DisabiUties, First UMC, Philadel- 
phia, PA, 22897-CO-747-D Annual Conference Committee on Disability 

Concerns 

U.M.R.F. + Elliott, Dirk Rev., WOH. WMI 22049-MN-406-D Local Pas- 
tor: Authority & Duties 

U.M.R.F. + ElUott, Dirk Rev., WOH, WMI 22052-MN408..5-D Rights of 
Local Pastors 

U.M.R.F. + EUiott, Dirk Rev., WOH, WMI 22055-MN-412.1-D Local Pas- 
tor as Member of Annual Conference 

UM Task Force on Developmental Disabilities 22218-Dl-NonDis-O 
Camping for Persons with Developmental Disabilities 

UM Task Force on Developmental Disabilities 22219-DI-NonDis-O Ar- 
chitectal Accessibility of Camping Facilities 

UMCOM, GCFA 21376-IC-1906.16-D Specific Responsibilities and Func- 
tions of the General Communication 

UMCOM 21365<:O-706.2-D Records and Archives 

UMCOM 21366-CO-726.5-D Committees, Task Forces, and Consultations 

UMCOM 21367-CO-726.5-D Committee on Communication 

UMCOM 21368-CO-726.5-D Committee on Publishing House Uaison 

UMCOM 21369-CO-726.10-D ResponsibiUties 

UMCOM 21370-CO-726iaD Responsibilities 

UMCOM 21371-CO-726.10-D Responsibilities 

UMCOM 21372-FA-907.5-D Other Administi-ative Responsibilities 

UMCOM 21374-IC1906.4-D ResponsibiUties of the General Commission on 
Communication 



UMCOM 21377-IC-1907.1-D Organization and Membership of the General 
Commission on Communication 

UMCOM 21378-IC-1907.2-D Meetings of die General Commission on Com- 
munication 

UMCOM 21379-IC-1907.3-D Officers of the Commission 

UMCOM 2138aiC-NonDis-0 A Call for Tnjdi. Fairness and Accuracy 

UMCOM 21381-IC-NonDis-O Violence in Elecfi-onic Media and Film 

United Methodist Appalachian Development Committee, Hagerstown, 
MD 20898-HE-1506.7-D Responsibibty of die General Board of Higher 
Education and Minisfi-y 

United Methodist Appalachian Development Committee, Hagerstown, 
MD 20901-LC-206.2-D Cooperative Parish Ministiies 

United Methodist Appalachian Development Committee, Hagerstown, 
MD 21514-CO-NonDis-O A Day at the 1996 General Conference to Ad- 
dress Centi-al Conference Issues 

United Methodist Appalachian Development Committee 20867-CS-l 104- 
D Responsibility of the General Board of Church and Society 

United Methodist Appalachian Development Committee 2087CK;O-Non- 
Dis-0 A Day at General Conference to Address Centi-al Conference Issues 

United Methodist Appalachian Development Committee 20879-DI- 
1202. 10-D Responsibility of the General Board of Discipleship 

United Methodist Appalachian Development Committee 20892-GM- 
R401-U Appalachian Mission 

United Methodist Appalachian Development Committee 22482-GJ-Non- 
Dis-O Training of New Distinct Superintendents and Conference Council 
Directors by GCOM 

United Methodist Appalachian Development Committee 22483-GJ-Non- 
Dis-O Program Funds of die General Board of Global Ministiies 

United Methodist Men Foundation, Madill, OK 20880-DI-1223-D United 
Methodist Men 

United Methodist Men Foundation, Waymire, Dale, Pres., Madil, OK, 
Adams. David C. Nashville, TN 20712-DI-NonDis-OS General Com- 
mission on United Methodist Men 

United Methodist Rural FeUowship * Elliott, Dirk, WOH 22236-FA-722- 
D Basic .Salary Plan - Option for Annual Conference 

United Methodist Rural Fellowship tPaige, Margaret, WMI 22176-CO- 
702-D Voting Rights tor Clergy Members 

United Methodist Rural FeUowship »Paige, Margaret 22284-GM-NonDis 
Rural Life Regional Centers 

United Methodist Rural Fellowship +Paige, Margaret 22436-LC-206-D 
Sti-engthening Cooix-rative Ministries through Training and Funding 

United Methodist Rural Fellowship +Paige, Margaret 22437-LC-208-D 
Study of I-ocal Church Potential 

United Methodist Rural Fellowship, National 21519-GJ-277.3-D Setting 
the Annual Theme for Rural Life Sunday 

United Methodist Rural Fellowship, National 21528-MN-509-D Termi- 
nation of Office — Bishop 



66 



Daily Edition Vol. 5 No 1 



United Methodist Rural Fellowship, National 21531MN-733.1D Board 

of Ordained Ministry ■ Associate Member 
United Methodist Rural Fellowship, National 21536-GJ-802.6-D Foster- 
ing Greater Awareness of Cooperative Ministries among all General Boards 
and Agencies 
IFnited Methodist Rural Fellowship, National 21542-GJ-1007.1-D Length 

of Service on General Council on Ministries 
United Methodist Rural Fellowship, Pigeon, MI 22020-IC-742-D Small 

Membership Church Commission 
United Methodist Rural Fellowship, WMI 22038-MN-53-C limitation of 

Tenure for Bishops 
United Methodist Rural Fellowship, WMI 22050-MN-407.5-D Local Pas- 
tor - Physical Evaluation 
United Methodist Rural FeUowship, WMI 22051-MN-408.2-D Definition 

of Part-Tmie Local Pastors 
United Methodist Rural Fellowship, WMI 22057-MN416.2-D Special 

Conditions for Admission to Probationary Membership 
United Methodist Rural FeUowship, WMI 22059-MN-419-D Rights of 

Associate Members 
United Methodist Rural FeUowship, WMI 22061-MN-421-D Progression 

to Full Membership for Associate Members 
United Methodist Rural FeUowship, WMI 22065-MN424.3-D Associate 

Members Prior to Elimination of Category 
United Methodist Rural FeUowship, WMI 22066-MN-426.4-D Ordained 

Ministers from Other Nations - Affiliate Members 
United Methodist Rural Fellowship, WMI 22069-MN-435-D Order of E- 

Ider and Elimination of Category of Associate Member 
United Methodist Rural Fellowship, WMI 22071-MN-437-D Part-Time or 

Bi-Vocational Ministry 
United Methodist Rural FeUowship, WMI 22073-MN439-D Duties of a 

Pastor: Community Context 
United Methodist Rural Fellowship, WMI 22080-MN-514-D Specific Re- 
sponsibilities of Bishops 
United Methodist Rural FeUowship, WMI 22081-MN-517-D Assignment 

of District Superintendent to Area-Wide Responsibilities 
United Methodist Rural FeUowship 21545-MN-532-D Community Con- 
text in Appointment Making 
United Methodist Rural FeUowship 22096-MN-756-D Committee on Or- 
dained Ministry - Associate Member 
United Methodist Rural FeUowship 22099-MN-1528-D Division of Or- 
dained Ministry - Laity as Members 
United Mediodist Rural FeUowship 22106-LC-207.5-D Churches in Tran- 
sitional Communities 
United Methodist Rural FeUowship 22117-LC-248.13-D Enabling Legisla- 
tion for Basic Salary Plan Option- The Charge Conference 
United Methodist Rural Fellowship 22118-LC-253.2-D Clarification of Re- 
sponsibilities of the Chairperson of Outreach Ministries 
United Methodist Rural FeUowship 22121-LC-257.3-D Enabling Legisla- 
tion for Basic Salary Plan Option- The Administrative Board 
United Methodist Rural Fellowship 22123-LC-262.2-D Responsibilities of 

Work Area Chairperson of Church and Society 
United Methodist Rural FeUowship 22129-LC-264-D Program Agencies: 

Involvement in Community Ministries 
United Methodist Rural FeUowship 22130-LC-264.1-D The Church 

School and Non-Violence 
United Methodist Rural FeUowship 22137-LC-270.2-D Enabling Legisla- 
tion for Basic Salary Plan Option- Committee on Pastor-Parish Relations 
United Methodist Rural Fellowship 22138-LC-270.2-D Responsibilities of 
Pastor-Parish (Staff-Parish) Relations Committees Regarding Lay Preachers 
United Methodist Rural FeUowship 22151-LC-2551-D Study of Local 

Church Potential 
United Methodist Rural Fellowship 22157-CO-38^ Election & EUgibility 

of Clergy Delegates to General, Jurisdictional or Central Conference 
United Methodist Rural FeUowship 22159-CO-505-D Number of Bishops 

in Jurisdictions 
United Methodist Rural Fellowship 22161-CO-506.2-D Election of Bish- 
ops and Limited Tenure 
United Methodist Rural FeUowship 22174-CO-612.1-D biterjurisdictional 

Committee on Episcopacy and Number of Bishops in Jurisdictions 
United Mediodist Rural FeUowship 22180-CO-707.4-D Membership on 

Annual Conference Councils. Boards & Agencies 
United Methodist Rural FeUowship 22182-CO-726.2-D Annual Confer- 
ence Council on Ministries Membership 
United Mediodist Rural Fellowship 22184-CO-726,10-D Responsibilifies 
of Annual Conference Council on Ministries 



United Methodist Rural FeUowship 22204-DM202.4-D Board of Disci- 

pleship Responsibilities 
United Methodist Rural FeUowship 22206-D1-1218.5-D Christian Forma- 
tion Responsibilities 
United Mediodist Rural FeUowship 22221-DI-1218.4-D Christian Forma- 
tion Responsibilities - EUB Traditions 
United Methodist Rural Fellowship 22228-FA-709.2-D Membership on 

Annual Conference Council on Finance & Administration 
United Methodist Rural FeUowship 22233^FA-718-D Enabling Legislation 

for Basic Salary Plan - Clergy Support 
United Methodist Rural FeUowship 22234-FA-719-D Enabling Legislation 

for Basic Salary Plan Option -Proportional Payments 
United Methodist Rural Fellowship 22235-FA-72aD Enabling Legislation 

for Basic Salary Plan Option - Clergy Base Compensation 
United Methodist Rural Fellowship 22245-FA-925-D Enabling Legislation 

for Basic Salary Plan - Option Episcopal Fund 
United Methodist Rural FeUowship 22247-FA-NonDis-O The Book of 

Resolutions in Computer Readable Format 
United Mediodist Rural FeUowship 22255-FA-NonDis-OS General Con- 
ference Budget 
United Methodist Rural Fellowship 2227SHE-NonDis-OS Funding Semi- 
nary Education 
United Mediodist Rural Fellowship 22276-HE-NonDis-OS Chair of Town 

and Country Ministries at Each Seminary 
United Methodist Rural Fellowship 22277-HE-NonDis-O Consistency in 
Language in The Book of Discipline Regarding Pastors/Clergy Members 
United Methodist Rural FeUowship 22279-GM-731.4-D Disaster Re- 
sponse Coordinator 
United Methodist Rural FeUowship 22280-GM-731.5-D Conference Par- 
ish & Development Committee 
United Methodist Rural Fellowship 22282-GM-1460-D Training of Disas- 
ter Response Coordinators: Responsibility of U.M.C.O.R 
United Mediodist Rural FeUowship 22285-GM-NonDis-O Affirming Rural 

Chaplaincy 
United Methodist Rural Fellowship 22286-GM-NonDis-O National Mis- 
sion Personnel 
United Mediodist Rural FeUowship 22287-GM-NonDis-O Office of Town 

and Country Ministries and Office of Urban Ministries 
United Mediodist Rural FeUowship 22288<}M-R204-U The Church's Re 

sponse to Changing Rural Issues 
United Methodist Rural Fellowship 22289-GM-NonDis-O Rural Crisis in 

the USA: Special Emphasis 
United Mediodist Rural FeUowship 22290GM-R157-U An Affirmation of 

Basic Rural Worth 
United Methodist Rural Fellowship 22292-GM-NonDis-O Appalachia: 

God's Face Toward the Mountains 
United Methodist Rural Fellowship 22294-GM-NonDis-OS Continuation 

of the Shalom Initiative 
United Methodist Rural FeUowship 22319-CS-72-D The Social Commu- 
nity: Rural Life 
United Mediodist Rural Fellowship 22331-CS-728.4-D Annual Confer- 
ence Board of Church and Society Responsibilifies 
United Mediodist Rural Fellowship 22388-MN-756.5-D District Commit- 
tee on Ordained Ministry and Lay Preacher 
United Mediodist Rural Fellowship 22403-DI-282-D Lay Preacher 
United Mediodist Rural Fellowship 22420-MN-520-D District Superinten- 
dent and Lay Preacher: Supervision 
United Mediodist Rural FeUowship 22421-MN-521-D The District Super- 
intendent and the Lay Preacher: Personnel 
United Methodist Rural FeUowship 22429-lC-NonDis-O Support "Racism 

in Rural Areas" Task Force Report 
United Methodist Rural Fellowship 22430-IGNonDis-O Designate "The 
Elimination of Racism in Us Many Forms" as a Special Emphasis for 
1997-2000 
United Methodist Rural FeUowship 22479-GJ-NonDis-O Staffing of Gen- 
era! Boards and Agencies 
United Mediodist Rural FeUowship 2252(>GM-R87-U U.S. Agriculture 

and Rural Communities in Crisis 
United Mediodist Rural Fellowship 22523-HE-1531-D Schools of Theol- 
ogy and Small Membership Churches 
United Mediodist Women, First UMC, RosweU, NM 22858-MN-NonDis- 
Resolution on the Re-Imaging Conference 



April 16, 1996 



67 



United Methodist Women, LRK UMW +11 Other Conf. UMW, 3 DisL 
20 Local Unit, and 20 individuals 20087-GM-NOND-O Affirm to 
Continue Giving through the Proper Channels ol United Methodist Women 

United Methodist Women, St James UMC, St. James, MN 22131LC- 
264.6-D Raffles of Handicraft Products 

Upper Room Sunday School Class, Central UMC, Fitzgerald, GA 22514- 
DI-NonDls-O Re-Affirm the Historic Foundation o( United Methodist 

Van Giesen, David L., MOW 22083-MN-518-D Limitations on Years of 
Service 

Van Giesen, David L., MOW 22205-DM217-D Leadership and Ministry 
Development Responsibilities 

Van Giesen, David U, MOW 22226-DI-282.2-D Lay Preacher 

Vieira, Gilbert H.,CNV 20869-CaNonDis-O Annual Conference Voting by 
Retired Clergy 

VIR 20011-CS-71-D Family Violence and Abuse 

VIR 20205-CO-703.2-D Timing of Conferences 

VIR 20220-GM-1411.3-D Reaffirmation of Bishop's Working Group on Mis- 
sion 

VIR 20247-HE-NonDis-O Guidelines for Sexual Misconduct Policies 

Vii^nia Annual Conference Board of Lait>' 22433-CO-3W: Voting Rights 
of the Annual Conference 

Voice for Life, South Georgia Annual Conference 22730-CS-NonDis-OS 
Establishment of a Ministry Promoting the Sanctity of Human Life 

Walter, Duane and Diane, Lakewood UMC, Sunfield, MI 22062-MN-421 
D Admission and Continuance of Full Membership in the Order of Elder 

Walter, Duane and Diane, Lakewood UMC, Sunfield, MI 22068-MN-435- 
D Admission and Continuance of Full Membership in the Annual Confer- 
ence and the Order of Elder 

Wasson, William, MOW 22076-MN445-D Continuing Education and Spiri- 
tual Growth 

Welton, Marilyn, Grand Avenue UMC, Crowder, OK 2278aGM-NonDis- 
0$ Ministry to Persons Who have Mental Illness 

West Ohio Conference MESA, 22905-IC-NonDis-O Racism Today 

West Ohio Conference MFSA, 22904-GM-NonDis-O Opposition to Abusive 
Treatment Methods of Persons with Mental Disabilities 

Wheat, Frank, MSS 22442-LC-270.2-D Committee on Pastor-Parish Rela- 



WiUis, Clarence J., The United Methodist Church of Bemaidsville, 
BemardsviUe, NJ, 23024-CS-NonDis-O Worth of a Life of Service 

Wilson, Wayne, Hughes United Methodist, Wheaton, MD 20004-CS- 
NonDis-0 Support rights to object to an autopsy on rebgious grounds 

Winget, Garry, KSW 22432-C0-35-C Composition of the Annual Confer- 
ence 

Winget, Gany, KSW 22435CO-702-D The Purpose of the Annual Confer- 

Wmget, Garry, KSW 22448CS-73-D The Economic Community 

WIS, EPA 20149-MN-733.1-D Giving Lay Members of the Board of Ordained 
Ministry a vote on all matters before die Board 

WIS, EPA 20151-MN-756.1-D Lay Members of the DisL Committee on Or- 
dained Ministry vote on all matters before Committee 

WIS, KEN, AKM 20I86-CO-3&C Remove Prohibition of Laity voUng on 
Ordination, Character, and Conference Relations of Ministers 

WIS, MNN, CAP, NYMO 20136-MN-402.2-D Correcting Language which 
Classifies Lesbians and Gay Persons 

WIS, NEB, NIL 20030-IC-R178-U Concerning Demeaning Names to Native 
Americans 

WIS, NEB, RKM, NYK, NIL 20031-CS-R634-U Recognition of Cuba 

WIS, WYO, NEB, NY-K 20516-GJ-NonDis-O Vote to keep the headquarters 
of the General Board of Global Ministries in New York City 

WIS, WYO, NEB 20032-CS-NonDis-O Use of the Church Studies on Homo- 
sexuality 

WIS 20015-FA-906.12-D Correcting Language which Classifies Lesbians and 
Gay Persons 

WIS 20046-MN-443.1-D hiterim pastors as category of appointment 

WIS 20115-MN-437.3-D Iterim Pastors 

WIS 20116-MN452 1-D Raising the Mandatory Retirement Age for Clergy 
from Seventy to Seventy-five 

WIS 201 18-MN-533.3-D Changes to the Appointment Process 

WIS 201 19-MN-1529-D Certification Standards for Conference-Approved hi- 
terim Pastors 

WIS 20120-CS71-D Correct Language which classifies Lesbian and Gay Per- 
sons 

WIS 20140-MN454.I-D Supervision in the Grievance Procedures 

WIS 20146-MN454-D Clarifying a Confusing Passage to Conform with Judi- 
cial Council Decision 695 



White, Michael L, AFL 22217-DI-NonDis-O A United Methodist Creed 

White, Michael L., AFL 22034-IC-NonDis-O A United Methodist Presence 
on The Internet 

White, Michael L., AFL 22041-MN-402.2-D Human Sexuality 

White, Michael L. , AFL 22172-CO-610.1-D Accountability for United Meth- 
odist Agencies/ Officials 

White, Michael L., AFL 22241-FA-906.1-D A Uniform Church-Wide Appor- 
tionment Formula 

White, Michael L., AFL 2234^CS-NonDis-0 An Official Denominational 
Stance on Homosexuality 

White, Michael L., AFL 22571-LC-230-D Care of Members 

White, Michael L., AFL 22572-LC-232.1-D Membership Records and Re- 
ports 

White, Michael L., AFL 22823-MN402-D Clergy Members as Employees 
of the Annual Conference 

Whitfield, D. Max, LRK 20817-MN-454-D Complaints 

Whitfield, D. Max, LRK 21031-LC-252-D Committee on Pastor-Parish Re- 
lations 

Whitfield, D. Max, LRK 22148-LC-254L2-D Voting of Members of the 
Local Church Property Committee 

Whitfield, D. Max, LRK 22149-LC-2544.7-D Voting of the Membership of 
the Building Committee 



Widmer, Scott & Members, First UMC, Elysburg, PA, WTA 2246aCS^ 

NonDis-O Proposal to Reduce the Waste of Paper 
Wilcox, Deborah M., St Paul UMC, Terre HiU, PA 22192-CO-NonDis-O 

Date of 2000 General Conference 
WiUiams, Mitchell, Asbury UMC, Birmingham, AL 21535-GJ-802.4-D 

Amenability and Program Accountability 
WiUiamson, H. C, Mullins UMC, Memphis, TN 20789-MN-NonDis-O 

Compensation of Local Pastors 
Williamson, H. C, Mullins UMC, Memphis, TN, 22906-LC-NonDis-O 

Compensation of Local Pastors 



WIS 20189-CO-702.1-D Enabling Laity as Voting Members of the Clergy 
Session 

WIS 20190-CO-705,6-D Givinglay members of the Board of Ordained Minis- 
try vote at the Clergy session 

WIS 20214-MN-2622-D A Description of the Nature of an Appeal 

WIS 20215-MN-2622-D Reasonable setting of time and place for fair Process 
Hearings and Interviews 

WIS 20216-MN-2622-D Stating the Constitutional Right of Protection fi-om 
Self-incrimination 

WIS 20218-MN-2625.3-D Democratizing tiie Nomination of the Committee 
of Investigation 

WIS 20224-LC-23aD Period of Grace for Inactive Members of a Local United 
Methodist Church 

WMI, HOL 20285-CS-71-D Human Sexuality 

WMI 20284-CS-71-D Amendment on Human Sexuality 

WMI 20288-CS-71-D Violence against Abortionists 

WMI 20290-CO-602.2-D Definition of membership in the Annual Conference 

WMI 20291-CO-702-D Definition of membership in the Annual Conference 

WMI 20293-IC-740.3-D Boundaries and Relationship of the Conference Com- 
mission on Religion and Race 

WMI 20294-MN-406.1-D Definition of "Charge- 

WMI 20295-MN-4U.3-D Associate Members replacing Counseling Elders 
for Local Pastors 

WMI 20296-MN-419.3-D Eligibility and Rights of Associate Members 

WMI 20297-MN-424.3-D Admission and continuance of Full membership in 
Annual Conference 

WMI 20298-MN-441-D Equalized Salary Task Force 

WMI 20300-MN452.1-D Mandatory Retirement of Clergy 

WMI 20303-MN435-D The Order of Elders 

WNC, NIL, GCCUIC, The Council of Bishops 20018^FA-918.2-D The 
Church of Christ Uniting in the Interdenominational Cooperation Fund 

WNC, NIL, GCCUIC. The CouncU of Bishops 20084-IC-5<; Ecumenical 
Relations 



Daily Edition Vol. 5 No. 1 



WNC, NTX 20345-LC-254-D Eliminate Administrative Board 
WNC, NTX 20346-LC-255-D Eliminate Administi-ative Board Membership 
WNC, NTX 20353-IjC-262-D Eliminate Local Church Work Area Chairper- 
sons 
WNC, NTX 20354-LC-263-D Eliminate Local Church Program Support Per- 
sonnel 
WNC, NTX 20356-LC-266-D Eliminate Local Church Age-Level and Family 

Councils 
WNC, NTX 20357-LC-267-D Eliminate Local Church Work Area Commis- 
sion 
WNC, NTX 20358-LC-268-D Eliminate Local Church Task Groups 
WNC, NTX 20472-CS-728-D Eliminate Annual Conference Board of Church 

and Society 
WNC, NTX 20476-CO-747-D Committee on Ministry To and With Persons 

with Handicapping Conditions 
WNC, NTX 20478-GM-731-D Eliminate Annual Conference Board of Global 

Ministries 
WNC, NTX 20479-HE-732-D Eliminate Annual Conference Board of Higher 

Education and Campus Ministiy 
WNC, NTX 20480-IC-738-D Eliminate Annual Conference Commission on 

Archives and History 
WNC, NTX 20481-IC-739-D Eliminate Annual Conference Commission on 

Christian Unity and Interreligious Concerns 
WNC, NTX 20483-IC-741-D Eliminate Annual Conference Commission on 

tile Status and Role of Women 
WNC, NTX 20484-1C-742-D Eliminate Annual Conference Commission on 

tiie Small Membership Church 
WNC, NTX 20488-GJ-748-D Eliminate Annual Conference Committee on 

Native American Ministi-y 
WNC, SNJ 20568-GJ-lOOl-D Eliminate General Council on Ministries 
WNC, SNJ 2057O-GJ-1002-D Eliminate General Council on Ministries 
WNC, SNJ 20571-GJ-1003-D Eliminate General Council on Minishies 
WNC, SNJ 20572-GJ-1004-D Eliminate General Council on Ministiies 
WNC, SNJ 20573-GJ-1005-D Eliminate General Council on Ministiies 
WNC 2(X)91-lC-2402-D Covenantal Relationships in the Church of Christ 

Uniting 
WNC 20555-CS-753-D Eliminate Disb-ict Director of and Committee on 

Church and Society 
WNC 20556-CO-12.1-C Effective Bishops as Members of General Confer- 

WNC 20557-CO-505-D President of Council of Bishops 

WNC 20558-CO-506-D Eliminate Nominations for Episcopal Elections 

WNC 20559-CO-6n.2-D Review of Resolutions 

WNC 20560-CO-629-D Eliminatejurisdictional Council on Ministries 

WNC 20561-CO-630-D Eliminate Jurisdictional Agencies 

WNC 20562-CO-638.32-D Stahis of Retired Bishops 

WNC 20563-CO-703.8-D Conference Lay Leader 

WNC 20564-CO-706.2-D Eliminate General Council on Ministiies 

WNC 20565-CO-707-D Connectional Relationships 

WNC 20566-CO-726-D Eliminate Conference Council on Ministiies 

WNC 20567-CO-752-D Optional Distinct Council 

WNC 20577-DI-279.1-D Church Council Approval of Lay Speaker 

WNC 20578-DI-280-D Church Council Approval of Certified Lay Speaker 

WNC 20579-DI-632-D EUminate Council on Minishies 

WNC 20580-D1-729-D Eliminate Annual Conference Board of Discipleship 

WNC 20581-DI-730-D Eliminate Annual Conference Board of Laity 

WNC 20582-DI-745.1-D Relationshipsof Council on Youth Ministiy 

WNC 20583-DI-757-D Eliminate Distiict Board of Laity 

WNC 20584-D1-762-D Distiict Youth Council 

WNC 20585-D1-1307-D Membership of National Youtii Ministir Organiza- 
tion Steering Committee 

WNC 20586-DI-7.5L1-D Disti-ict Lay Leader 

WNC 20587-FA-709.2-D Annual Conference Council on Finance and Admini- 
stration 

WNC 20588-FA-71H-D Annual Conference Budgeting Procedures 

WNC 20589-FA-712-D Annual Conference Apportionment Procedures 

WNC 20590-FA-716.1-D Duties of Treasurers 

WNC 20591-FA-722-D EquiUible Compensation 

WNC 20592-FA-904-D Amenability of General Council on Finance and Ad- 
minisb'ation 



WNC 20593-FA-905-D Organization of General Council on Fmance and Ad- 

ministi-ation 
WNC 20594-FA-906-D Fiscal Responsibilities of General Council on Fmance 

and Administration 



WNC 20596-FA-908-D General Program Agency Funds 

WNC 20597-FA-910-D Definition of General Funds 

WNC 20598-FA-911-D General Policies of General Council on Fmance and 

Administi-ation 
WNC 20599-FA-912-D Support of tiie General Program Agencies of tiie 

Church 
WNC 2060O-FA-913-D EUminate World Service Special Gifts 
WNC 20601-FA-916.1-D Eliminate General Council on Ministiies 
WNC 20602-FA-922-D EUminate General Council on Ministi-ies 
WNC 20603-FA-1602.1-D Membership of General Boani of Pension and 

Health Benefits 
WNC 20604-FA-1604.8-D Funding of General Board of Pension and Health 

Benefits 
WNC 20605-FA-1702-D Organization of General Board of PubUcation 
WNC 20606-FA-1737-D EUmination General Council on Ministries 
WNC 20607-GJ-275-D EUminate General Council on Ministiies 
WNC 20608-GJ-276-D EUminate General Council on Ministi-ies 
WNC 20609-GJ-277.3-D EUminate Annual Conference Council on Ministries 
WNC 20610-GJ-727-D Conference Advance Program 
WNC 20611-GJ-802-D General Agency AccounUibiUty 
WNC 20612-GJ-803-D General Agency Definitions, StinicUires, and Tides 
WNC 20613-GJ-805-D General Agency Membership 
WNC 20614-GJ-806-D EUminate Committee to Nominate Additional Mem- 
bers 
WNC 20615-GJ-810.5-D General Agency Members on Annual Conference 

Agencies 
WNC 20616-GJ-813-D Election of General Secretaries 
WNC 20617-GJ-814.6-D Convening of General Secretiuies 
WNC 20618-GJ-818-D Consultation Concerning Use of General Church Pro- 
grams and Funds 
WNC 20619-GJ-914.1-D The Advance 

WNC 20620-GJ-1006-D EUminate General Council on Ministiies 
WNC 20621-GJ-1006.2-D Funding of General Agencies 
WNC 20622-GJ-1007-D EUminate General Council on Ministiies 
WNC 20623-GM-1409.1-D Election of General Secretary of General Board of 

Global Ministiies 
WNC 20624-GM-14U.4-D General Board of Global Minishies Funding 
WNC 2062SGM-1412.6-D Membership of General Board of Global Minis- 
hies 
WNC 20626-GM-1415.1-D Authority of National Division 
WNC 20627-GM-1429-D Membership of Women's Division 
WNC 20628-GM-1446-D Financial Support of Healtii and Welfare Ministiies 

Department 
WNC 20629-HE-1503-D Amenabihty of General Board of Higher Education 

and MinishY 
WNC 20630-HE-1509.2-D Support of General Board of Higher Educationa 

and Ministry 
WNC 20631-H&1512-D Fundingof Division of Chaplains and Related Minis- 
tries 



WNC 20633-1C-754-D EUminate Distiict Director of and Committee on Eth- 
nic Local Church Concerns 

WNC 20634-1C-755-D EUminate Distiict Director of and Committee on ReUg- 
ion and Race 

WNC 20635-1C-1803.2-D AccountabiUty of General Commission on Archives 
and History 

WNC 20636-IC-1804.2-D Membership of General Commission on Archives 
and History 

WNC 20637-IC-1904-D Amenability of General Commission on Communica- 
tion 

WNC 20638-1C-1906.12-D Promotion of Funds by General Commission on 

WNC 20639-IC-1906.21-D EUminate General Council on Ministiies 

WNC 20640-IC-1907.1-D Membership and Staff of General Commission on 



April 16, 1996 



69 



WNC 20641-IC-1908-D Funding for General Commission on Communication 

WNC 20642-IC-2003-D Eliminate General Council on Ministries 

WNC 20643-IC-2(X)4D Eliminate General Council on Ministries 

WNC 20644-1C-2006.1-D Membership of General Commission on Christian 

Unity and Interreligious Concerns 
WNC 20645-1C-210I.1-D Amenability of General Commission on Religion 

and Race 
WNC 20646-IC-2103-D Membership of General Commission on Religion and 

Race 
WNC 20647-1C-2204.1-D Membershipof General Commission on the Status 

and Role of Women 
WNC 20648-1C-2208-D Eliminate General Council on Ministries 
WNC 20649-LC-206.3-D Church. Charge and Parish Councils 
WNC 20650-LC-227-D Associate Church Membership and Church Council 
WNC 20651-LC-228-D Church Council and Care of Members 
WNC 20652-LC-229-D Church Council and Membership Groups 
WNC 2065^LC-230-D Church Council and Inactive Church Members 
WNC 20654-LC-233-D Church Council and Church Membership Audit 
WNC 20655-LC-235-D Church Council and Membership Secretary 
WNC 20656-LC-244-D Local Church Organization in Relationship to District 

and Annual Conference Structure 



WNC 20658-LC-248-D The Charge Conference and the Church Council 

WNC 20659-LC-248.14-D Local Church Apportionments 

WNC 20660-LC-249-D The Church Council and Church Conference 

WNC 20661-LC-250-D Basic Leadership of the Local Church 

WNC 20662-LC-251-D Eliminate Certain Mandated Local Church Officers 

WNC 20663-LC-252.1-D Local Church Lay Leader, Lay Member of Confer- 
ence, and Church Council Chairperson 

WNC 20664-LC-253.1-D The Church Council 

WNC 2066SLC-256-D Eliminate Administrative Board Officers 

WNC 20666-LC-257-D Eliminate Administrative Board Responsibilities 

WNC 20667-LC-257.4-D The Church Council and Local Church Funding 

WNC 20668-LC-258-D Eliminate Local Church Council on Ministries 

WNC 20669-LC-259-D Eliminate Local Church Council on Ministries 

WNC 20670-LC-260-D Eliminate Local Church Coordinators 

WNC 20671-LC-261-D Eliminate Local Church Work Areas 

WNC 20672:LC-264-D Local Church Program Agencies 

WNC 20673-LC-269-D Eliminate Local Church Classes and Leaders 

WNC 20674-LC-270.1-D Local Church Administrative Committees 

WNC 20675-LC-271.6-D Constituting Church Conference 

WNC 20676-LC-2553.1-D Church Council in Shared Facility Situation 

WNC 20677-MN-5(K; Membership of the Council of Bishops 

WNC 20678-MN-57-C President of the Council of Bishops 

WNC 20679-MN-315.4-D Church Council and Diaconal Minister 

WNC 20680-MN-445.3-D Church Council and Clergy Growth Leave 

WNC 20681-MN-445.4-D Eliminate Conference Council on Ministries 

WNC 20682-MN-452-D Ad Interim Clergy Retirement 

WNC 20683-MN-510-D Status of Retired Bishops 

WNC 20684-MN-514-D Election of General Secretaries 

WNC 20685-MN-514.3-D Limit Travel of Bishops 

WNC 20686-MN-516.3-D Announcement of Appointments 

WNC 20687-MN-734.1-D Diaconal Ministry 

WNC 20688-MN-519-D Council on Ministries and District Superintendents 

WNC 20689-MN-521-D Limit Travel of District Superintendent 

WNC 20690-MN-524.1-D Council on Ministries and District Superintendents 

WNC 20691-MN-527-D Responsibilities of Council of Bishops 

WNC 20692-MN-527-D ResponsibiUtiesof Council of Bishops 

WNC 20693-MN-533-D Consultation in Appointment-Making 

WNC 20694-MN-1529.5-D ResponsibiUtiesof Division of Ordained Ministry 

WNC 20695-1C-2106-D Eliminate General Council on Ministries 

WNC 20696-LC-245-D Basic OrganizaUonal Plan for the Local Church 

WNC 21126<:S-NonDisOS Denominational Office and Director of Prison 

Ministry 

WNY 20370-Dl-NonDisO Reaffirm our "Doctrinal Standards and Our Theo- 
logical Task" 

WNY 20378-GM-NonDis-O Holy Boldness and Urban Ministry 



Wofford, Delbert R., Settle Memorial UMC, Owensboro, KY 22813-LC- 

253-D Chairperson of Prayer Ministries 
Wofford, Delbert R., Settle Memorial UMC, Owensboro, KY 22814-LC- 

261-D Work Area on Prayer in the Local Church 
WOH 20719-GJ-NonDis-O Relocation of the General Board of Global Minis- 
tries 
Work Area of Church and Society, Williamsburg UMC, WUIiamaburg, 

VA, 22883CS-71-D Rights of Homosexual Persons 
Work Area of Church and Society, Williamsburg UMC, Williamsburg, 

VA, 22882-CS-71-D Human Sexuality 
Work Area of Church and Society, Williamsburg UMC, Williamsburg, 

VA, 22881-CS71-D Human Sexuality 
Work Area of Church and Society, Williamsbui^ UMC, Williamsburg, 

VA, 22887-CS-NonDis-O Responsible Parenthood 
WPA Board of Ordained Ministry 22053-MN^ll-D Change in Language 

Concerning Quadrennial Training of Counseling Elders 
WPA Board of Ordained Ministry 22097-MN-756.1-D Extending Voting 

Privileges of Lay Persons on District Committee on Ordained Ministry 
WPA, GBCS 20304-CO-NonDis-O Implementing the "People Fu-st" Lan- 
guage 
WPA, SGA. WTWI, NTX, RKM 20242-LC-102-D The Ministry of all Chris- 
tians 
WPA, SGA, WMI, NIX, RKM 20243-LC-I03-D The Churches 
WPA, SGA, WMI, NTX, RKM 20244-LGlOl-D The Mission and Ministry 

of the Church 
WPA, SGA, WMI, NTX 20234-D1-69-D Mission statement 
WPA, SGA, WMI, NTX 20241-U:-101-D The Mission of the Church 
WPA 20305-CS-72-D Rights of Persons with Handicapping Conditions 
WPA 20306<;S-76-D Our Social Creed 

WPA 20307-CO-628-D Authority of the Jurisdictional Conference. Amend 
WPA 20308CO-702-D Annual Conference membership of Local pastors 
WPA 20309-CO-707.4-D Membership on Boards and Agencies 
WPA 20310-CO-747-D Committee on Ministry to and with persons with 

Handicapping Conditions 
WPA 20311-CO-752.2-D Membership of the District Council on Ministries 
WPA 20312-D1-729.1-D General responsibilities of the Conference Board of 

Discipleship 
WPA 20313-D1-730.3-D Membership of the Conference Board of Laity 
WPA 20314-D1-757.2-D Membership of the District Board of Laity 
WPA 20315-D1-1209.5-D Standards Governing Camping 
WPA 20316-D1-1210.2-D Ministry to Persons with Handicapping Conditions 
WPA 20317-D1-1221.4-D Membershipof the Committee on Older Adult Min- 
istries 
WPA 20318-FA-2519-D Board of Church Location and Building 
WPA 20319-FA-2521-D Approval of construction, purchase, or remodeling 

plans for local churches 
WPA 2032O-GJ-805.1-D General Agency Membership 
WPA 20321-GJ-815-D Policies relative to nondiscrimination 
WPA 20322-GM-731-D Responsibilities of the Conference Board of Global 

Ministiies 
WPA 20323-GM-1440-D Purpose of the Health and Welfare Ministiies De- 
partment 
WPA 20324-GM-1441.5-D Responsibilities of the Health and Welfare Depart- 

WPA 20325-GM-1442-D Responsibilities of the Health and Welfare Depart- 

WPA 20326-HE-I515.-D Responsibilities of the Board of Higher Education 

WPA 20327-1C-740.2-D Conference Commission on Religion and Race 

WPA 20328-LC-250.7-D Special Attention for the Inclusion of all 

WPA 20329-LC-251.4-D Duties of the Charge Conference 

WPA 20330-LC-259-D Elections to the Council on Ministiies 

WPA 20331-LC-260-D Age-Level, Family, and Specialized-Ministries Coordi- 
nators 

WPA 20332-LC-263 2-D The Health and Welfare Ministiies Representative 

WPA 20333-LC-2533.6-D AccessibiUty Audit by the Board of Trustees 

WPA 20334-LC-2544-D Responsibility of the Building Committee 

WPA 20335-MN-306.4-D Completion of Candidacy 

WPA 20336-MN-4 I2-D Annual Conference membership of Local Pastors 

WPA 20337-MN-414 4-D Qualification for Election to Probationary Member- 
ship 

WPA 20338-M N-439. ID Responsibilities and Duty of a Pastor 

WPA 2034O-MN-735.1-D Conference Committee on ^iscopacy 



Daily Edition Vol. 5 No. 1 



WPA 20341-MN-759.1-D Membership of Committee on District Superinten- 

(lency 
WVA Church and Community Ministry Committee 22283-(;M-NonDis-0 

Program of Church and Communit>' Ministry 
WVA 20299-MN448.2-D Charge Conference Membership Requirements 
WVA 20339-MN-452.5-D Charge Conference Membership Requirement 
WVA 20499-FA-722.12-D Shared Salary Plan OpUon 
WVA 20524-CS-NonDis-O Principles of Welfare Reform 
WVA 20533-MN-414.8-D Deacon Candidates 
WVA 20534-MN-424-D Elder Candidates 
WVA 20772-IC-NonDis-O$ GeneralCommission on Inclusivenessof Persons 

with Handicapping Conditions 
WYO, CAP, WVA, NYK, NIL 20023<;S-72-D Basic Rights of all Persons 
WYO, RKM 20033-IC-NonDis-O Racism Today 
WYCTRY, RKM, NYK, NIL 20029-CS-NonDis-O Clinic Violence around 

Reproductive Rights 



WYO 20019-FA-931-D Shared Salary Plan 

WYO 2002&CS-NonDis-O The Embargo against Cuba 

WYO 20O44-MN-434.4-D Certificate of Ordination to those Ordained as Dea- 



WYO 2(X)47-MN-453.2-D Withdrawal to Unite with another DenominaUon 
WYO 20113-MN-412-D Credentials to all Clergy Members of the Annual 

Conference 
WYO 20230-CONonDis-O Voting Rights of ReUred Clergy Members 
WYO 21467-CO-35-C Composition of the Annual Conference 
Yeakel, Joseph H., Bishop, BMW 22673-L0114-D Definition of Clergy 



Yeaman, John F., SIX 22850-MN-532.2-D Criteria in Appointment Making 



■^m 



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the Episcopal Address 
by Bishop Judith Craig 
and the opening communion service 








scheduled for the convention center 
here tonight. 




Bishop Judith Craig 










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DailyRqport 



Daily Christian Advocate 

THE GENERAL CONFERENCE OF THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 



Denver, Colorado 



Wednesday, April 17, 1996 



Vol. 3 No. 2 



Holy Communion, Episcopal Address Highlight Day One 

When the early circuit riders and missionaries strug- 
gled to the foot of the Rockies, where Native Americans 
were already at home, did they ever imagine the future? 
Did they conceive of a time when nearly 1,000 delegates 
plus their reserves, 125 bishops, and 2,000 staff and visi- 
tors would gather in Denver to celebrate and map the 
future of a worldwide, vibrant United Methodist Church? 

But on Day One of the 1996 United Methodist General 
Conference it happened, beneath the familiar cross and 
flame symbol and the theme: "In Essentials Unity, In 
Non-Essentials Liberty, In All Things Charity" 

The opening procession for the Communion service 
began with the cross lifted high, followed by the bishops 
from Africa, Asia, Europe and the United States. Bishop 
Sharon Brown Christopher and Bishop Woodie W. White 
served as liturgist and celebrant respectively. 

In his sermon, Bishop Roy I. Sano challenged delegates 
to embrace a future which appreciates the distinctive 
contributions of women, people of color and those margi- 
nalized. "The past will be surpassed, but not supplanted," 
he said.' "New surprises and new possibilities await us. 
Let us keep open to new possibilities and respectful of our 
past." 

After debating the report of the Committee on Plan of 
Organization and Rules of Order (reported elsewhere in 
the DCA), the gathering dispersed throughout the con- 
vention center to meet in legislative committees, elect 
officers and begin to consider more than 3,000 petitions, 
reports and proposals. 






Agenda 




April 17, 1996 


8:15 a.m. 


Choral Music 


8:30 a.m. 

9:00 a.m. 
10:00 a.m. 
12:30 p.m. 


Morning Worship 

Laity Address 1 

Ministry Study 

Lunch 


2:30 p.m. 
5:00 p.m. 


Legislative Committees 
Dinner 


7:30 p.m. 
10:00 p.m. 


Legislative Committees 
Adjournment 



area. UMNS photo 

In the evening the General Conference experienced 
three of many "firsts" for the 10-day event. Bishop Judith 
Craig, the first woman to deliver the Episcopal Address, 
echoed the unity theme: "The church we order must be 
an open house, where Jesus sits at the doorway and 
welcomes all who come." For the first time, the address 
was accompanied by a multi-image visual, prepared by 
United Methodist Communications, and a choir of bishops 
and their spouses sang, another first. 

Acknowledging potential conflicts over several issues. 
Bishop Craig heralded the church as "alive and well." She 
listed: 29 Africa University graduates just six years after 
the school's beginning; 400,000 Disciple Bible Study 
graduates; more than 500,000 persons completing the 
Walk to Emmaus; more than 2,700 U.S. youth and young 
adults attending events focusing on ordained and diaconal 
ministry; a National Plan for Hispanic Ministiy taking 
wing; a growing United Methodist presence in Russia; and 
more than 103,000 Volunteers in Mission. And the list 
continued. 

"Is the church aUve? Does evangelizing bear fiiiit? . . . 
You know the signs. You are the signs," the bishop said. 
"The [Communion] table stands between the old and new 
covenants, bringing together as one the continuing activ- 
ity of the God of all covenants." 

Roger L. Burgess 



April17, 1996 



The Computer Bug Ate Them 

That's the only explanation we have for four peti- 
tions that should have been m one of the two advance 
editions of the DCA. 

"We caught the missing petition related to the 
Korean Missionary Conference early," said J. Rich- 
ard Peck, DCA editor. "We were able to include that 
petition in yesterday's edition." The editor's fur- 
rowed brow would lead one to believe he is con- 
cerned a few more petitions might show up missing. 

"I hope the bug had a restricted diet," the editor 
continued. "If not, the achieved record of entering 
3,064 petitions and only dropping four isn't bad I 
guess we could get our contract renewed!" 



Daily Christian Advocate 

Editorial Offices - Exhibit Hall B 

Denver Convention Center 

Sales and Subscriptions - DCA Booth 



Editor J. Richard Peck 

Associate Editor Shelia McGee 

Assistant Editor Joan Shoup 

Roundup and Photo Editor Brad Motta 

News and Features Editor Barbara Dunlap-Berg 

News and Features Writers: Roger Burgess, Keith Pohl 

Computer Manager/Calendar Editor Mike Cunningham 

Composition Editor for Proceedings Gayl Hinton 

Composition Editor for News aid Features Richard Street 

Recorder/Trainer/Conversion Specialist Glenn Hinton 

Assistant Tramer Vem Denney 

Manager of Audio Transcription George Dunn 

Audio technicians: Gilbert Elam. Steve Fleener, Walter Patton 

Coordinator of Verbaim Transcribers: Angela BuUer 

Transcribers: Heather Peck, Alice Gabel. Michelle Newman 

Coordinator of Copy Editors Marvin Cropeey 

Copy Editors: Martha Cooper, Beverly Sahnon, Phyllis Weeby, Patty Meyers 

Marjorie Pierson 

Verbatim Proof Reader/Channel B Identifiers: John Thoniburg, Bob McClean 

Index Editor Thelma Boeder 

ProducticD Manager Billy Murphy 

Sales Manager Juanita Freudenthal 

Sales Representatives Barbara Acuff. Aneal Joseph, Marge Poteete 

[)istribution Manager Cedric Foley 

Office Manager Mochell Hughes 

Hosl^ostesses JoAnn Qark, Roberta Sterrenberg, Burl Kreps 



Correction 

Council of Bishops listing in the April 16th DCA. 

Bishop Bruce P. Blake's name was spelled incorrectly. 
Bishop James K. Mathews is an active Bishop. 
Bishop Benjamin R. Oliphint's name was misspelled. 



NowSigtiing 
in Autogmj^ Area 



Tex Sample 

6:00-7:00 p.m. 

Hard Living People and Mainstream Christians 

Joe Harding and Ralph Mohney 
12:30-1:15 p.m. 
VISION 2000 

Raquel Martinez 

12:30-1:15 p.m. 

MIL VOCES (U.M. Spanish Hymnal) 

Eddie Fox 
12:30-1:15 p.m. 
Faith Sharing 

Philip Wogaman 

1:30-2:30 p.m. 

To Serve the Present Age 

Michael Slaughter 

1:45-2:30 p.m. 

Spiritual Entrepreneurs 

Ellsworth Kalas 

1:45-2:30 p.m. 

The Grand Sweep 

Reuben Job 

1:45-2:30 p.m. 

A Guide to Retreat for All God's People 

Maxie Dunnam 

12:30-1:30 p.m. 

Let Me Say That Again 



Daily Edition Vol.3 No 2 



Reception Honors Bishops, Judicial Council 



The evening before the official opening of the 1996 
General Conference, delegates and friends came to- 
gether tor a "homecoming" to honor episcopal leaders 
and their spouses and the 10 members of the Judicial 
Council. 

"Welcome the world to our neighborhood!" was the 
theme for the festive Monday evening event in the Con- 
vention Center ballroom. Honored were 68 active bish- 
ops, including 17 from conferences in Afnca, Asia and 
Europe; 60 retired bishops and their spouses from around 
the world; and 33 widows of bishops. 



"The Tongan Village Dancers," Rocky Mountain An- 
nual Conference church members from Tonga, provided 
entertainment. The ballroom was divided into sections, 
decorated and named for Tongan villages. 

This first gathering gave General Conference goers an 
opportunity to greet their episcopal leaders and reunite 
with friends in other conferences worldwide. Partici- 
pants took full advantage of this opportunity with joy, 
tears, memories and the discovery of new friends. 

-Bettte W. Story 




The "Tongan Village Dancers" 
welcome the guests to the 
Bishops' and Judicial Council 
Reception Monday evening in 
the Ballroom. 



UMNS photo by Mike DuBose 




Bishop Mary Ann Swenson (left) and 
her husband, Jeff Swenson, wel- 
come delegates and visitors. 

UMNS phoio by Mike DuBose 



Buttons, Buttons, Everywhere!!! 

If you have a message for the delegates at General 
Conference, it has probably been put on a button. 
Many groups, caucuses, boards and agencies have 
created buttons to make themselves visible here. 
The buttons are just beginnning to become visible. 
Share your buttons with the DCA , and we will pubHsh 
a collage of the buttons in a future issue. Drop them 
by the DCA office, attention Brad Motta. 



April17, 1996 



Legislative Committee Officers 

Committee on Central Conference Affairs 
Bishop Emerito P. Nacpil, chair, Baguio and Manila 
Minerva G. Carcano, secretary, Rio Grande 

Church and Society 

Don Pike, chair. Central Texas 

Joseph Hams, vice chair, Oklahoma 

Terrie Rae Chattin, secretary, Baltimore-Washington 

Conferences 

George G. Hunter III, chair, Florida 

Judith E. Siaba, vice chair, Northern Illinois 

Beth L. Cook, secretary, North Georgia 

Discipleship 

Paul Ervin Jr., chair. North Georgia. 

Susan Hasstnger, vice chair, Eastern Pennsylvania 

Martha Etter, secretary. Southwest Texas 

Financial Administration 

Casher Evans Jr., chair. North Carolina 

Mollie Stewart, vice chair. North Alabama 

Zedna Haverstock, secretary, Central Pennsylvania 

General/Judicial Administration 

David L. Severe, chair, Oklahoma 
Minerva G. Carcano^ vice chair, Rio Grande 
Thelma L. Johnson, secretary, West Ohio 

Global Ministries 

Carolyn E. Johnson, chair. North Indiana 

Howard L. Daughenbaugh Jr. , vice chair. Central 111. 

Betty Suzuki, secretary, California/Nevada 

Higher Education and Chaplaincy 

J. Allen Norris Jr., chair, North Carolina 
J. LaVon Wilson, vice chair. Central Ilhnois 
Janet E. Stephenson, Secretary, Iowa 

Independent Commissions 

Carl E. Stewart, chair, Lxjuisiana 

Ressie Mae Bass, vice chair, Florida 

Betty J. Adraussen, secretary, Missouri West 

Local Church 

Janice Riggle Huie, chair. Southwest Texas 
Shirley Parris, vice chair. New York 
Hershel S. Sheets, secretary, North Georgia 

Ordained and Diaconal Ministry 

Sandra W. Luty, chau". East Ohio 
Earl W. Bledsoe, vice chair, Texas 
Louise K. Schock, secretary, Northwest Texas 



Street Side Cafe, Convention Center 

Wednesday, April 17, 1996 
7:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. 

Waffles with whipped cream & fresh strawberries . . 

Green chili burritos with scrambled eggs 

Scrambled eggs, hash browns & bacon or sausage .... 


5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
200 


Cold cereal (adult selection) 

Assorted breakfast pastries 

HOT ENTTREES: 


1.50 
1.50 

6.50 


Herb roasted chicken served with four bean ragout 

and fresh market vegetables 

Vegetarian Wellington with four bean ragout 

ASSORTED SALADS 


4 25 


Tuna, chicken, pasU, fruit 
Soup of the day 


200 


Submarine sandwich (by the inch) 


1.25 
1.25 




ASSORTED DESSERTS 

Yogurt 


2.00 
175 




1.50 
1.50 






.75 


BEVERAGES 




Mineral water 


200 




200 


Fountain sodas 
Large 


1.50 




1.25 


Milk 

Coffee 


1.00 
1 on 





Newly Elected Officers Take Crash Course 

Twenty newly elected chairpersons and vice-chairper- 
sons met with several General Conference leaders for a 
crash course in how to be effective leaders of their 
respective legislative committees. Robert W. Stevens, 
Pacific Northwest Conference lay delegate, focused on 
how to move legislation through so it will be in good shape 
for consideration by the General Conference. 

Carolyn Marshall, General Conference secretary, 
acted as moderator and offered assistance to the leaders, 
most of whom are in their positions for the first time. 

Bishop Dan E. Solomon cautioned: "Remember you 
are about God's business. You must give leadership in 
that light. You have accountability to the gospel and 
accountability to the task." 

The new leaders also heard from representatives of 
groups which will work with them: the General Commis- 
sion on the Status and Role of Women, which will monitor 
the legislative committees; United Methodist Communi- 
cations, which is videotaping the plenary sessions; and 
the translators. 

"Your job starts immediately," Bishop Solomon said, 
"because you must return to your rooms tonight and 
become famihar with your petitions. It will be a very long 
night." 

-Carolyn Simms 



Daily Edition Vol.3 No. 2 



CHURCHES IN COVENANT COMMUNION 
The Church of Christ Uniting 



Approved and recommended to the churches by the 
Seventeenth Plenary of the Consultation on Church Un- 



PARTI 

THE COVENANTING PROPOSAL 

WHAT KIND OF UNITY? 

1) Scripture makes clear that Jesus calls the church to 
become visibly one. On the night before his crucifixion, 
Jesus prayed for the disciples and for those who would 
follow: 

"I do not pray for these only, but also for those who are 
to believe in me through their word, that they may all be 
one; even as you, Father, are in me, and I in you, that they 
also may be in us, so that the world may believe that you 
have sent me " — John 17:20-21 

2) Based on the conviction, grounded m Scripture and 
Tradition, that God wills the unity of the church, the 
following proposal describes a covenantal form of unity. 
Biblical examples of unity are expressed in metaphor, 
such as Isaiah's vision of the peaceable kingdom (Isaiah 
11), and m parable, such as Jesus' story of the great feast 
(Luke 14) Rooted in the nature and action of the tnune 
God, who is revealed to us as unity m diversity, the 
covenanting churches of the Consultation on Church Un- 
ion hold to the vision of a reconciled and reconciling 
household of faith. Scnpture and Tradition provide guid- 
ance on matters of unity, even though no blueprint exists. 

3) Attentive to the yearnings and insights discerned 
from ecumenical dialogues over many years, the partner 
churches have come to believe that such a form of unity 
bears at least the following characteristics: 

(a) Celebration of God's grace will be central to our life 
together. (Eph. 2:12-21) 

(b) Working together in Christ's mission of salvation 
for the whole world will mark our endeavors. (Matt. 
28:18-19a) 

(c) Each member, by virtue of baptism, will be under- 
stood to be a member of the apostolic and priestly minis- 
try. (I Peter 2:9-10) 

(d) The form of unity will mirror the diversity of its 
membership in every aspect of its fellowship and minis- 
try. (I Cor. 12:12-27) 

(e) In seeking God's justice in church and world, the 
reconciled communions will embody the unity that is 
God's gift. (Lk. 2:4(5-55) 

(0 Because of the mutual enrichment of our several 
traditions, this covenantal form of unity will more faith- 
fully reflect the universality of the body of Chnst and 
include the strengthening of our previous ecumenical 
commitments. (I Cor. 1:12-17) 

(g) Covenant com m union assumes a new kind of eccle- 
sial reality, an organic life that includes, in Pauline lan- 



guage, those "joints and ligaments" which enable the 
church to act as one body knit together under Christ the 
head. (Col. 2:19; Eph. 4:15-16) 

4) Given such characteristics of the unity God wills for 
the church, the Consultation on Church Union calls upon 
its member churches to confess their complicity in the 
sin of the church's division, and to do all that can be done 
to exhibit that unity. Moreover, the Consultation pro- 
poses to the member churches, in the pages that follow, 
a form of unity which it beheves to be at once faithful to 
God's will, appropriate to the present cu-cumstances, and 
open to the future for renewal and reformation. It is a 
proposal which calls for unity of heart and mind, for unity 
in faith, in prayer, in the breaking of bread, in the Word 
of the gospel, in ministry, in sharing, and in witness and 
service to the world. (Acts 2:42-44) Such unity will be a 
visible witness to the world of God's saving power in 
Jesus Christ. The Consultation on Church Union calls the 
churches to communion in Christ — a covenantal com- 
munion in faith, sacraments, mimstry, and mission. The 
name here given to the churches in covenant communion 
is The Church of Christ Uniting, and the means by 
which it comes into being is referred to as "covenanting." 

II. WHAT IS COVENANTING? 

1) "Covenanting," as the Consultation uses the term, 
IS both an act and a process by which the churches come 
into a new relationship with one other. 

2) It is an act of covenant by churches which, though 
one in Christ, are currently divided from one another. By 
this solemn act the churches will commit themselves, 
before God and each other, to live henceforth in one 
covenantal communion even though they continue to 
exist as distinct ecclesiastical systems. 

3) Such a covenantal act will inaugurate also a. process 
of deepening commitment by these churches to one an- 
other in which the Spirit's gift of unity in Christ will be 
enabled to grow and to flower. The process will be one of 
maturing in unity as the covenanting churches jointly 
identify and take such mutually agreed actions as may 
serve to deepen their communion in faith, sacrament, 
ministry, and mission. 

4) In covenanting, diversities remain even while the 
covenanting partners become truly one. Moreover cove- 
nant communion is itself a way of being one. The church 
is by its very nature a pilgrim people. Through covenant 
communion the relationship with one another will grow, 
deepen, and change as it matures over the years, as this 
covenant communion is drawn forward by the Holy Spmt 
into the fullness of God's perfect will for the church. 

5) In covenant communion the churches may mamtam, 
for so long as each may determine, their own church 
structures and traditions, including present forms of wor- 
ship, systems of ministerial selection, traimng, and place- 
ment, their international, confessional, and communion 
relationships, and their mission programs. What cove- 
nanting means is that these now separated churches will 



April 17. 1996 



resolve to live as one in the most basic things — in faith, 
sacrament, ministry, and mission. Uniformity in structure 
is not essential to covenant communion. 

6) Approaching Christian unity in this way will tend to 
focus the energy of the churches' shared life upon the 
local communities of now separated congregations. For it 
is in such towns, neighborhoods, and local areas that 
Christians most often gather about the Word and sacra- 
ments, served by their recognized ministers, in living 
communities of faith and mission. Covenanting will make 
it possible for these several congregations in each place 
to see themselves not only as members of a particular 
communion but also as members of a living and function- 
ing communion of communions, shanng the one baptism, 
proclaiming the one faith, receiving together the one 
bread and cup, recognizing the ministry of each as a 
ministry to all, and reaching out as one in love and service 
to the world, 

7) A covenant communion of churches is, by definition, 
committed to becommg truly inclusive. Each partner is 
enriched by sharing in the gifts that God has given to the 
other. Each partner works to take down walls of alienation 
that exist between the churches, and to overcome atti- 
tudes which tend to marginalize persons in regard to race, 
class, age, gender, disabilities, marital status, sexual ori- 
entation, and positions of power and powerlessness, and 
to live toward a church in which all participate in the 
wholeness of Christ. 

8) In covenanting, the churches will make an act of 
common repentance for the sin of disunity among them, 
and for the sins which inhibit community within the 
human family. In living out that repentance, the covenant- 
ingchurches dare to believe that in sacramental commun- 
ion these sins can be faced in a substantially new way. 
What is needed for reconciliation is a new and intentional 
community of the Spirit, rooted in one Lord, one faith, one 
baptism, and nurtured at one eucharistic table. Such unity 
anticipates God's coining future, now unfolding in Jesus 
Christ. It IS the promised gift of the Holy Spirit to those 
who penitently ask for it and diligently seek it. 

9) Covenant communion is intended to be a sign and 
foretaste of the community God wills for the world. In its 
ultimate intent, it is for the salvation of each and all. It is 
for the redemption of the world. 

III. HOW TO INITIATE COVENANTING 

1) Faithfulness to God's mission m the world impels the 
member churches to enter into covenanting. To initiate 
covenanting, actions of several different kinds will be 
required. Just as doctrine, polity, and liturgy are basic to 
the church's life and mission, so also the initiation of 
covenanting has these same three interrelated dimen- 
sions: 

• Theological: the churches receive and voice together 
the faith of the church through the ages. 

• Governmental: the governing bodies of the church 
consider and act on com monly developed proposals for 
Christian unity. 

• Liturgical: the churches' unity is declared and 
conSnned in corporate acts of worship. 



To initiate covenanting, action in all three of these 
dimensions is required, in faith that it is God who moves 
the churches to act and who alone is able to sustain them 
in covenant communion. In Christ, the interrelationship 
between these three dimensions can be discerned: the 
church's theological affirmation is grounded in the joyful 
praise of God, with implications for the church's polity; 
its governmental decision has a theological grounding, 
with implications for the church's worship; and its litur- 
gical action has a grounding in the church's polity, with 
implications for the church's theology. 

2) The theological dimension of entering into cove- 
nanting is basic to the rest. The Consultation on Church 
Union has looked carefully at the differences which his- 
toncally have divided the several traditions. Through the 
consultative process, confirmed by the claiming of The 
COCU Consensus, the churches have come to recognize 
in one another the apostolic faith of the church universal: 
the Tradition. Through covenanting, the distinctive 
treasures of these several histories will be maintained, 
while their insights and emphases will be made increas- 
ingly accessible to others for the common good. The 
process of covenanting begins by joyfully affirming the 
Chnstian faith. 

3) The governmental dimension of entering into 
covenanting is also essential. This has to do with the 
decision making processes of each church. It includes 
voting. For the church, however, voting is much more 
than an exercise of democratic rule. When Christians 
gather in church governing bodies and seek God's leading 
through prayer and careful listening to one another in 
faith, God is there in the midst of them. The formal 
decision by each church to enter into this new relation- 
ship IS therefore much more than a preparation for cove- 
nanting, but is itself a dimension of covenanting. Such 
governing action by each church is, the Consultation 
believes, a manifestation of God's action through the Holy 
Spirit in drawing the churches together into covenant 
communion. 

4) The liturgical dimension of entering into cove- 
nanting is crucial as well. It is God who affects reconcili- 
ation m the divided household of faith. Corporate 
expressions of mutual commitment, shared hope, and 
common will must therefore be lifted up together in 
words and actions appropriate to the worship of God. 
Agreements reached separately must be celebrated to- 
gether. The liturgical action in covenanting is much more 
than a ceremonial capstone for a uniting covenant which 
has been successfully voted; the Uturgical action itself will 
be a sign and means of church unity. 

5) Each of these dimensions has both an internal and an 
external aspect, related respectively to the church's life 
and to its mission. Thus the church's doctrinal life, con- 
sisting in appropriation of apostolic faith through contin- 
ual theological reflection and teaching, finds its missional 
aspect in the urgent proclamation of the gospel of Jesus 
Christ, by word and deed, in and to the world. Similarly, 
the church's polity as the pastoral pattern of its Ufe in 
Chnst at once stands under the constant judgment of the 
gospel of God's reign and is directed to active mission for 
a just and life-giving stewardship of creation. Also, the 
worship of God in the church's Ufe issues in mission and 



Daily Edition Vol.3 No. 2 



service to the whole human community created in the 
divine image and redeemed by Christ from its multiple 
distortions. Mission illummates each of these three di- 
mensions. 

6) Crucial to covenant communion, in all three of the 
dimensions by which it is initiated, is a deliberate process 
of reception of the covenanting agreements by the 
churches. Such reception includes the participation and 
nurture of the people of the church, enabling them to 
understand and to receive these agreements and to enter 
fully the covenant communion into which their churches 
are bemg drawn. No such communion is possible, what- 
ever one's system of church government may be, without 
the willing and joyful assent of the people of God. To that 
end, it is essential that the membership of the churches 
be fully informed about what is being proposed, so that 
their AMEN may be from the heart. A strong educational 
effort, accompanied by relationships which anticipate 
covenant life, can be an important part of the reception 
process. These can serve as vehicles of the Holy Spirit 
for building and strengthening ecclesial communion, as 
the churches find themselves increasingly beckoned of 
God to be and become one covenant people in Christ. 

IV. THE ELEMENTS OF COVENANTING 

1) Since the unity that we seek is not chiefly organiza- 
tional, what then are the identifying characteristics of that 
covenant communion here described? Through the Con- 
sultation on Church Union, the participating churches 
have together identified eight elements of covenanting, 
none of which now consistently characterize the relation- 
ship between these churches. They are: 

1. claiming unity in faith; 

2. commitment to seek unity with wholeness; 

3. mutual recognition of members in one baptism; 

4. mutual recognition of each other as churches; 

5. mutual recognition and reconciliation of ordained 
ministry; 

6. celebrating the Eucharist together; 

7. engaging together in Christ's mission; 

8. formation of covenanting councils. 

These are described more fully below. They are called 
"elements" because each is regarded as basic to a cove- 
nant communion of churches. Together, they comprise a 
single reality, and each in its own way is essential to the 
whole. 

Claiming Unity in Faith 

There is one body and one Spirit, just as you were called 
to the one hope that belongs to your call, one Lord, one 
faith, one baptism, one God and Father of us all, who is 
above all and through all and in all.— Ephesians 4:4-6 

2) The "one faith" which the church proclaims and by 
which it lives is the faith of the one holy catholic and 
apostohc church. This is the faith to which Scnpture and 
Tradition bear witness. Notwithstanding differences of 
emphasis and interpretation, the covenanting churches 
dare to affirm their essential unity m the faith. Claiming 

that faith in rnminnn ic Kaoi/* tr\ rr\\;^nant /^r»»ri mii«irtTi 



3) The ancient ecumenical creeds are not only wit- 
nesses to the faith but also abiding symbols of that faith. 
The divided voices of many churches, however, make it 
difficult today for the faith of the church to be heard by all 
as one. After more than two decades of theological work 
by officially designated persons responsible to the most 
authoritative bodies in the several churches, it is now 
evident that an essential core of theological agreement 
exists and continues to grow among these churches in 
matters of faith, worship, sacrament, membership, min- 
istry, and mission. That agreement is expressed in The 
COCU Consensus: In Quest of a Church of Christ Uniting 
(1984). The existence of that document is a sign of these 
churches' basic unity m faith; their claiming of it is treated 
as an element of covenanting, 

4) The COCU Consensus is not a complete exposition 
of every article of Chnstian doctrine. It is intended rather 
as a sufficient expression of the apostolic faith, order, 
worship, and witness to enable the participating churches 
to enter together into a covenanting relationship. It also 
is intended as the theological foundation for the vision of 
a covenant communion of communions which these 
churches seek by God's grace to become. It is therefore 
the theological basis of the document in hand. Churches 
in Covenant Communion: The Church of Christ Untting._ 
For a fuller expression of what it means to "claim" the 
consensus, see the Foreword of The COCU Consensus, 
pages 2-3. 

Commitment to Seek Unity with Wholeness 

5) Commitment to Christian unity is essential if 
churches are to become visibly one. The Consultation 
affirms that unity is a gift of God, to be made visible among 
the churches in response to the prayers and actions of 
those who dihgently seek it. 

6) Through patient and persistent work over many 
years, the covenanting churches have been led by God to 
overcome seemingly insurmountable obstacles to unity 
in matters of faith, sacraments, ministry, and mission. For 
this the church gives thanks to God. Yet the churches still 
are not one in other ways. Racism and sexism still hve as 
idolatries in churches, continuing to divide and destroy. 
Handicapism marginahzes people with disabilities as the 
institutions of both church and society continue to value 
physical wholeness in divisive and destructive ways. Rich 
and poor seldom worship God together. These are theo- 
logical issues, just as truly as those of sacrament and 
mission, for they demonstrate to the world the church's 
disobedience to the will of Christ "that they may all be 
one." 

7) Commitment to a living unity, therefore, requires a 
change of heart — "transformed by the renewal of your 
mind" — not for the sake of the church alone, but ulti- 
mately for the sake of that larger oneness for which our 
Savior prays. To repent of sins that divide Chnst's body 
IS to turn from them to God, committed by God's grace 
to obey the clear will of Christ. It means being ready to 
change, especially in these idolatries which alienate and 
cause pain to sisters and brothers in Chnst. It is to seek 
a unity that is inclusive of all who are baptized into Chnst, 
while rejoicing in the diversity of persons and gifts which 



April 17, 1996 



8)/« Christ "there is neither Jew nor Greek. " God abhors 
racism. It is essential to Christian unity that there be a 
redress of racism and a commitment to racial inclusive- 
ness, in both our churches and our society. This is not 
alone a matter of justice or mission. This commitment is 
fundamental to Christian community itself, forthe church 
is continually called to be and to become one living 
communion in Chnst. 

9) In Chnst "there is neither bond nor free. " God abhors 
all forms of oppression, whether economic oppression or 
that of society s exclusion of persons with disabilities. In 
a community where any ennch themselves at the ex- 
pense of the poor, or exert power through the disadvan- 
tage of others, Christian unity cannot exist. The gospel 
which the church proclaims is "good news to the poor... 
release to the captives... recovery of sight to the blind... 
liberty to those who are oppressed." Inclusiveness is not 
just a matter of goodwill, but of the justice which the 
gospel demands. It is therefore of the very nature of the 
church, which is called to be one living body in Christ, 

10) In Christ "there is neither male nor female. " God 
abhors sexism. Degradation or diminution of others on 
the basis of gender, whether intended or not, is an affront 
to them and an offense to their Creator. The church often 
has fostered attitudes which devalue women. Such atti- 
tudes are the root cause of many evils which the church 
deplores, such as domestic violence, pornography, and 
the disproportionate poverty of women. Opportunities for 
leadership and full participation in the church are in many 
instances still effectively closed to women. The church 
cannot be whole without the gifts both of women and men 
in covenant communion through Christ. 

11) Inclusiveness is essential to Christian unity. The 
word "inclusive," however, must be used with some care. 
For example, ethnic minorities often hear the word as a 
patronizing invitation to become part of the dominant 
group — to enter another's reality, but one which the 
other continues to dominate. Gay and lesbian persons in 
most churches seldom are included at all, if they are open 
m acknowledging their sexual identity. The appeal to 
inclusiveness is heard by some as an invitation to give up 
one's distinctive identity and merge into a culture alien 
to one's own. So the word "inclusive" is not an altogether 
adequate word, though it is far better than any others thai 
have yet been proposed to replace it. The Consultation 
uses it, therefore, sensitive to its possible misuse, being 
deeply persuaded that there can be no unity forthe church 
unless it is truly inclusive. By "inclusiveness" is meant 
the catholicity of God's inclusiveness. 

12) The goal of this covenant communion is not a 
homogenization of all differences into a new sameness, 
but a new community in Chnst, in which differences are 
affirmed, accepted, and celebrated as the gifts of God for 
the common good. This is a work of divine grace. The 
integrity, moral authority, and strength of witness that 
this covenant communion of churches will have within the 
nation and the world will be in significant measure related 
to its becoming, by God's grace, a truly inclusive com- 
munion in Christ. 



Mutual Recognition of Members in One Baptism 

13) Scripture and Tradition are united m witness that 
there is one baptism with water in the name of the triune 
God. Baptismal practice among the churches, however, 
IS quite diverse, including both a variety of baptismal 
modes and, for some, preliminary acts of dedication or 
blessing and, for others, additional acts of affirmation of 
baptismal vows such as confirmation. This diversity re- 
flects not different baptisms but different facets of the one 
baptism into the one body of the one Lord. (Eph. 4:4-6) 

14) At its 1974 plenary session the Consultation on 
Church Union proposed a "Mutual Recognition of Mem- 
bers," by which it invited the member churches to recog- 
nize that "all who are baptized into Christ are members 
of Christ's universal church and belong to and share in 
Chnst's ministry through the people of the one God, 
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit." Over the next four years 
each of the participating churches took formal and official 
action approving this resolution. These acts were a dra- 
matic witness to our unity in Chnst. 

15) In its 1979 plenary, the Consultation proposed to 
its member churches that each take actions to move 
"Beyond Affirmation to Action" in implementing such 
mutual recognition. Many suggestions were offered by 
the plenary, and a number of significant actions were 
taken in response by the several churches, but much 
remains to be done. Recovery of our unity in baptism is 
at the heart of the covenanting journey, for it is central to 
realization of genuine koinonia among the churches. Mu- 
tual recognition of members in one baptism is of basic 
ecclesiological significance. It implies recognition of the 
ministry of all the others in the common priesthood in 
which and from which God calls those ministers who will 
be ordained. Membership in Christ and in Christ's church 
is for every believer a calling by God to ministry and 
witness in the world. 

Mutual Recognition of Each Other as Churches 

16) A church's membership in the Consultation on 
Church Union implies at least some recognition of the 
other member churches as participants in the one church 
of Jesus Christ. So also does membership in a council of 
churches. In local experience, congregations have some- 
times achieved relationships which amount to mutual 
recognition in spite of certain canons and constitutions of 
their churches. The fact is, however, that the member 
churches of the Consultation on Church Union, acting in 
conformity with their respective foundational documents 
and theological principles, have not yet recognized each 
other as churches truly catholic, truly evangelical, and 
truly reformed. The absence of mutual recognition comes 
as a surprise to many who have been unaware of the 
official positions of the churches, and compels us to press 
on until such mutual recognition is achieved. 

17) Covenanting provides the occasion and the means 
whereby that which is implicit in the relationship among 
the churches may become explicit, that which is privately 
and unofficially achnowledged may be openly and joyfully 



Daily Edition Vol.3 No. 2 



declared before God and many witnesses. To that end, in 
the liturgical event in which covenantmg is inaugurated, 
participating churches through their authorized repre- 
sentatives will together make affirmations of: 

• faith m the one God who through the Word and m the 
Spirit creates, redeems, and sanctifies; 

• commitment to Jesus Christ as Savior and as the 
incarnate and risen Lord; 

• obedience to the Holy Scriptures which testify to 
Tradition and to which Tradition testifies, as 
containing all things necessary for our salvation as well 
as being the rule and ultimate standard of faith, 

• commitment to faithful participation in the two 
sacraments ordained by Jesus Christ, baptism and the 
Lord's Supper; 

• commitment to the evangelical and prophetic mission 
of God and to God's reign of justice and peace; 

• grateful acceptance of the ministry which the Holy 
Spirit has manifestly given to the churches. 

These affirmations are to be voiced together in the 
liturgical act by which covenanting will be inaugurated. 
Through these words spoken together, each church will 
publicly and officially recognize the others as authentic 
expressions of the one, holy, catholic, and apostohc 
church of Jesus Christ. This liturgical action will fulfill the 
intention to confess the faith together affirmed in Chapter 
V of The COCU Consensus, where the fundamental 
sources of the doctrine of the faith are described in detail: 
Scripture, Tradition, and the creeds and confessions of 
the church, together with worship, mission and inclusive- 
ness as forms of confession. 

Mutual Recognition and Reconciliation 
of Ordained Ministry 

18) Through their baptism all Christians are called and 
empowered by the Holy Spirit to share in the ministry of 
Jesus Chnst in the church and in the world. Those among 
them who are ordained to particular ministries share also 
in that common ministry of the people of God, and repre- 
sent to every member the ministry of Chnst to which all 
have been called. Because the ministry of the baptized is 
affirmed already by each of the covenanting churches, 
there appears to be no impediment to public recognition 
and reconciliation of this common ministry. Obstacles 
remain to be overcome, however, to affect the mutual 
recognition and reconciliation of our ordained ministries. 
In the paragraphs which follow, therefore, attention is 
focused largely upon the ordained because that is where 
obstacles to the mutual recognition and reconciliation of 
our ministries lie. 

19) The theological understanding of ministry, both lay 
and ordained, which underlies covenanting is set forth in 
Chapter VII of The COCU Consensus. But it is important 
to remember how that chapter of the Consensus is in- 
tended to function m the covenanting process. It is not a 
constitution. 



Many details are deliberately left unsettled. There is 
room for the participating churches to grow together in 
unforeseen ways as they work out the implications of the 
covenant. 

In the realm of ministerial order, just as in the doctrines 
ot the faith, there is a historic tradition which these 
churches hold in common, despite their differing expres- 
sions of it; and it is this that the Consultation has sought 
to express in Chapter VII of The COCU Consensus. The 
concept of ministry expressed there is not embodied in 
quite this way in any of the participating churches. Yet 
there can be seen in the divergent polities of the member 
churches particular ministries which are in fact episcopal, 
presbyteral, diaconal, and lay in their essential nature. 
Chapter Vn articulates this historic, underlymg pattern, 
providing thereby a common frame of reference for rec- 
ognizing in one another's ministries the ministry of the 
church through the ages, and thus for reconciling their 
ministries one to another. Uniformity among the several 
church polities is not essential to covenant communion; 
but mutual recognition and reconciliation of the ordained 
ministries is essential, for it is integrally related to the 
recognition of churches. 

20) Mutual recognition of ordained ministries is in- 
tended to acknowledge in these ministries the manifest 
blessing of God and the fruit of the Spirit, and to affirm 
that they are rooted in the apostolic tradition. Such rec- 
ognition does not obscure real differences, but neither 
does it depend upon first setting those differences aright 
according to one's own tradition before recognition can 
be granted. To the contrary, the mutual recognition of 
ordained ministries is a way of acknowledging both the 
headship of Christ over every ecclesial tradition and the 
freedom of the Spirit to work in and through these tradi- 
tions however the Spirit wills. 

21) Reconciliation of ordained ministnes is intended to 
refer to actions by the churches, both separately and 
together, whereby the ordained mmistnes of each cove- 
nanting church become one ministry of Jesus Christ in 
relation to all. This is not intended to mean that the 
standard of ministerial training and certification must 
become the same for all the churches, nor that their call 
or appointment systems must change, but rather that the 
ministry of one may function, whenever invited, as a 
ministry to all. This is not now possible among all of the 
covenanting churches. Hence, covenanting will make 
possible an enrichment of the ordained ministry for each 
church, as well as provide a new and visible demonstra- 
tion of our essential unity in faith, sacraments, ministry, 
and mission. 

22) The method by which the covenanting churches 
intend to accompUsh reconciliation of ordained mmistries 
IS, first, by setting this reconciliation in the context of 
mutual recognition of members in one baptism, mutual 
recognition of churches, and mutual recognition of minis- 
tries. Within the covenanting liturgy, these three acts will 
precede the reconciliation of ordained ministries and, 
taken together, are regarded as foundational to it. For the 
sake of reconciliation, the sequential order of these acts 
IS important, and their close conjunction with one another 
IS equally important. This ordenng is reflected in the 
accompanying liturgy for declanng covenant and recon- 



10 



April17, 1< 



ciling ordained ministers. Reconciliation of ministnes 
enables full euchanstic sharing. 

23) Having mutually recognized one another's mmis- 
tnes, these ministers will then offer themselves in mutual 
commitment to one another, so that their ministry in the 
wider covenant communion may be received and appro- 
priately ordered in all of the covenanting churches. To 
this end, the accompanying liturgies provide that the 
reconcihation of bishops shall include words of mutual 
commitment to one another in covenant, and an act of 
mutually laying hands upon each other in acknow- 
ledgment of the authority of the other churches within 
which each will, from time to time, exercise elements of 
shared ministry through covenanting. So also, the accom- 
panying liturgy for the reconciliation of presbyters and 
welcoming of deacons includes words which similarly 
acknowledge the authority of the other churches within 
which each is enabled to minister occasionally through 
covenant communion and an act of laying on of hands by 
a reconciled minister of episkope, together with other 
signs of reconciliation and peace. 

24) Lest there be any misunderstanding in regard to 
the sign of reconciliation which these liturgies employ — 
the laying on of hands by an authorized minister of over- 
sight — the covenanting churches recognize and declare 
that these are not liturgies of ordination or reordination, 
but of reconcihation among those whose ordained minis- 
try already has been mutually recognized. The act of 
laying on hands is used for many different purposes within 
the church. It is used in blessing, in confirmation, in 
dedication, in anointing the sick, in commissioning to 
tasks of education or of mission, as well as in ordination. 
In each case, it is the context which defines its purpose. 
In the covenanting liturgies, the laying on of hands is 
administered in silence. The context, especially the 
prayer which precedes or follows, leaves no doubt as to 
its meaning: it is an act of reconciliation. 

25) The Consultation is persuaded that no other sign 
serves that purpose as well as the ancient sign of the 
laying on of hands by the churches' authorized ministers 
of oversight. From the beginning of their journey to- 
gether, the covenanting churches have sought a distinc- 
tively new communion: one that is simultaneously 
catholic, evangelical, and reformed. However evangelical 
and reformed this covenant communion may be, it will not 
effectively invite recognition of its ordained ministnes by 
all parts of the universal church if the reconciliation of 
ordained ministnes does not include the histonc sign of 
episcopal succession — the laying on of hands. Its use 
under the circumstances here defined has to do, not with 
ordination, but with the recovery of a visible and widely 
valued sign of unity and continuity within the church of 
God, a sign that in this case signifies the mutual shanng 
of our ordered ministries. This understanding is m har- 
mony with increasingly universal ecumenical under- 
standing. 

26) Just as the use of this sign is judged to be essential, 
so also the way it is used is equally essential: by the 
mutual laying on of hands. It is m the mutuality of this act 
that each tradition gives to the other a sign of acceptance 
and of deepened or enriched understandings of ordination 



and episkope as they have been preserved and practiced 
in the separate churches. 

27) When reconciliation of ordained ministries has been 
achieved at the regional level, everyone who is ordained 
thereafter in that region will be ordained into an already 
reconciled ministry. No further act will be required to 
accomplish reconciliation. Nonetheless, the ordination of 
women and men to the ministry is such a highly visible 
act in the life of the churches that it provides for our 
covenant communion an unparalleled opportunity to 
demonstrate before the church and the world the unity 
which God has given. From the date of inauguration of 
covenant communion, there will be no more ordinations 
earned out in denominational isolation from the other 
covenanting churches. The Covenanting Councils will 
enable the conduct of all ordination of persons, creden- 
tialed by the churches, through the laying on of hands and 
prayer by reconciled bishops together with the presence 
and participation of ministers, both lay and ordained, from 
as many of the covenanting churches as possible. More- 
over, it IS the desire of the covenanting churches that 
these ordinations be conducted according to mutually 
acceptable rites, in order to facilitate participation from 
all parts of the covenant communion. 

28) All of the participating churches in COCU already 
have a ministry of Word and sacrament, but not all now 
have a personalized ministry of episkope at the middle 
judicatory level where ordination and pastoral care of 
pastors is lodged. Nor do all now have a regularly consti- 
tuted office of deacon. It will be the responsibility of each 
participating church, prior to the COCU liturgy in which 
covenant is declared and ministries are reconciled, to 
determine how its present categories of ordained minis- 
try relate to the historic categories set forth in The COCU 
Consensus^ Chapter VII. 

29) Among the several functions of deacons listed in 
paragraph VII.63 of The COCU Consensus, the one func- 
tion which may be regarded as sine qua non in identifying 
persons who are to be put forward initially for reconcili- 
ation as deacons is: "(f) Servants in Pastoral Care." 
Among the several functions of presbyters listed in The 
COCU Consensus VII.56, those which may be regarded 
as sine qua non in identifying persons who are to be put 
forward initially for reconcihation as presbyters are: "(a) 
Preachers of the Word," and "(b) Celebrants of the Sac- 
raments." Among the several functions of bishops listed 
in paragraph VII.5 1 of The COCU Consensus , those which 
may be regarded as sine qua non in identifying those who 
are to be put forward initially for reconcihation as bishops 
are: "(c) Pastoral Overseers" of districts or regions, "(e) 
Representative Ministers in the Act of Ordination," and 
"(g) Servants of the Unity of the Church." 

30) Each covenanting church may find these ministenal 
offices already existing within its polity, or may make 
amendment of existing offices to the extent necessary to 
fulfill the intention of ministry reconciliation through 
covenanting, or may create a new office within the integ- 
rity of its continuing polity but m a manner conformable 
to the intention of ministry reconcihation through cove- 
nantmg. Each church may assign or continue to use such 
names for these offices as it may desire; however, in the 
shared life of the churches they commonly will be identi- 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No. 2 



11 



fied as deacons, presbyters, and bishops of the covenant 
communion of the churches. 

31) By reconciliation through covenanting, a presbyter 
or bishop docs not acquire new nghts, powers, or author- 
ity within his or her own denomination or communion. 
Such decisions about authonty are properly left to the 
member churches. Rather, through ministry reconcili- 
ation It becomes possible to act in ecclesial unity with 
other lay and ordained ministnes of the covenanting 
churches to make manifest in new and wider ways the 
visible and organic unity of the church. 

Celebrating the Eucharist Together 

32) The Lord's Supper is the sacred feast of the people 
of God. In communion with Chnst, members of the 
church are renewed in their communion with one another 
in Christ, and are commissioned afresh to be Christ's 
agents of reconciliation in the world. The sacrament is at 
the heart of the church's life. Regular celebration of the 
Eucharist together is at the heart of covenanting as well. 

33) Observance of the Lxsrd's Supper is a sign of the 
church's unity m Chnst. In the present divided state of 
the churches, it is an ironic witness against their disunity 
as well. As Chnstians gather in all their diversity at one 
table of the Lord, they give evidence that their commun- 
ion IS with Chnst, and hence, that they are in communion 
with one another in Christ. But when Christians are 
unable or unwilhng to partake together of the one Eucha- 
nst, they witness against themselves and give a visible 
demonstration of the brokenness of Christ's body. Com- 
mon celebration of Holy Communion is essential to the 
unity we seek. 

34) The sacrament of the Lord's Supper exhibits a 
richness of meaning that is larger than the tradition of any 
single church. Its essential meaning is bnefly stated in 
The COCU Consensus, Chapter VI, paragraphs 15-19. 
Without obscuring differences which remain, the cove- 
nantmg churches find in The COCU Consensus sufficient 
agreement regarding the meaning of the Lord's Supper 
to enable partaking of it as one, while allowing for diver- 
sity of administration and practice. At the same time, they 
share in an increasingly universal convergence of Chns- 
tian understanding that includes the following elements 
which should characterize all eucharistic liturgies: 

• it is a great thanksgiving to God for everything 
accomplished in creation and redemption; 

• it is a memonal of the crucified and risen Chnst and a 
sign of Christ's redeeming love for all humankind; 

• it is an invocation of the Holy Spirit who makes the 
crucified and risen Christ really present to us in the 
sacramental meal; 

• it is a communion of the faithful who, in communion 
with Christ, are in communion with one another in 
Chnst; 

• it is a meal of the kingdom, a foretaste of the final 
redemption of all things in Chnst. 

The euchanstic hturgies already authonzed by the 
churches of the Consultation reflect such a mutually 
accepted pattern. 



35) Shared celebration of the Eucharist is both a sign 
and a means of unity in Christ. Even before the inaugura- 
tion of covenanting, the churches' experience of interim 
euchanstic fellowship over more than a decade has dem- 
onstrated the dynamism of regular eucharistic sharing for 
the sake of Chnstian unity. The power of reconciling 
grace made present in the sacrament has been compelling 
in furthering a new degree of unity between churches 
which have been deeply separated for many years along 
racial lines. It is that same power which has long been 
evident at the Lord's Table within each church, effecting 
the reconciliation of those who have become personally, 
politically, or theologically estranged from one another. 

36) The Lord's Supper also is a powerful centering 
reality for the church's mission. The church always is 
tempted to pursue either institutional or ideological ends 
in mission, substituting its own will for the will of Christ. 
Some even regard Christian unity as an enemy of the 
church's mission, in the belief that unity draws energy 
away from cherished causes. But at the eucharistic table, 
we "show forth the Lord's death until he comes." That is 
in itself a powerful act of gospel proclamation, providing 
the spnng for Christian witness and action. Indeed, it is 
the paradigm of all that the church is called to say and to 
do in mission in the world. Unity and mission are one at 
the Lord's Table. 

37) In covenanting, it is important that common cele- 
brations of the Eucharist be planned with intentional 
regularity. The frequency of such occasions is left to the 
discretion of the covenanting partners in each place. 

Engaging Together in Christ's Mission 

38) Mission is essential to the church's apostolicity. 
The church is apostolic not only because it continues in 
the faith and teaching of the apostles, but also because it 
is sent, like the apostles, to carry out Christ's mission to 
all people. Mission is essential to life in the church. It is 
essential as well to life in covenant communion among 
the churches. 

39) The mission of the church takes many forms. In 
simplest terms, it is a mission of reconciliation and re- 
demption. It is participation as a commissioned servant in 
God's mission, which is "to umte all things in Christ, 
things in heaven and things on earth." (Eph. 1:10) The 
church engages in mission through worship, through/)roc- 
lamation of the gospel, and through action which embod- 
ies God's justice, peace and love. 

40) In worship, the church recalls and celebrates the 
mighty acts of God in creation, redemption and provi- 
dence, is graciously forgiven and renewed in faith, hope 
and love, and is sent out in the power of the Holy Spirit, 
individually and collectively, to be ambassadors, wit- 
nesses and servants of Christ to the world . But in worship 
the church does more than just prepare for mission. 
Worship itself is one of the ways the church engages in 
its mission until the end of time. Even in places where 
some forms of mission are forbidden by the state, the 
faithful assembhng of the people for Chnstian worship is 
a mighty witness to the gospel. What happens in worship 
IS of vital significance for the world: the church intercedes 
for the world, and Chnst is present for the life of all 
people. There is no such thing as Chnstian mission not 



12 



April 17. 1996 



rooted and renewed continuously in the church's wor- 
ship. Worship IS mission 

41) Proclamation of the gospel also is mission. Be- 
yond the gathered worshipping community, faithtul tell- 
ing of the story by which the church Uves is an essentia! 
part of its apostolate to the world. The church has been 
entrusted with the story that is hfe for the world. It is 
preserved and sent mto the world to proclaim that story 
The church can never be content simply to signify its faith 
by deeds done m silence, however essential such deeds 
are. The church is called as well to confess unambiguously 
the Christ m whom it lives, and to invite all who will to 
enter the fellowship of life in Chnst through the church, 
and thus be faithful to its evangeUstic task. Proclamation 
is mission, 

42) Action which embodies Christ's mission of 
justice, peace and love is the church's mission, too. With- 
out such action, the church's worship and proclamation 
are betrayed, "for the tree is known by its fruit." This 
action is described in many ways in Scripture: it is rehef 
for the poor, release for pnsoners, sight for the blind, 
liberty for the oppressed; it is food for the hungry, dnnk 
for those who thirst, welcome for strangers, clothes for 
those who have none, companionship for those who are 
sick, imprisoned, or alone. God in Christ has a special 
concern for those whom the world mistreats or over- 
looks: the poor, the weak, the oppressed, those excluded 
from full participation m society, and those who by reason 
of physical or mental disability, race, language or culture 
(such as African American, Asian, Pacific Islander, His- 
panic, Native American) are dehumanized. Faithful par- 
ticipation in Christ's mission of justice, peace and love for 
all people, and the integrity of creation, requires repen- 
tance of the church: a deliberate turning away from all the 
various expressions of unconscious racism — individual, 
corporate, systemic — naming them and renouncing 
them. But such repentance is not enough unless it results 
in actions for justice, focused on eliminating those condi- 
tions which permit racism to fester and violate human life. 

43) It is appropriate to add something more specific 
regarding the church's action in mission, in view of the 
racial and ethnic diversity of this covenant communion. 
Christian unity, for churches of predominantly Afiican 
American membership, is a subject never far removed 
from struggles to overcome poverty and to achieve social, 
economic, and racial justice. The struggle for civil nghts 
in this country was rooted in the African American 
churches, and it became the greatest contribution of these 
churches to Christian unity in this century. With its 
hohstic concern for the civic, spiritual and material well- 
being of every person, this evangelical movement for 
human nghts gave new meaning to the word from which 
"ecumenical" is derived, oikoumene: "the whole inhabited 
earth." It embodied "ecumenical altruism": love that 
leaps all boundaries out of a profound respect for all 
people. This movement has taught us that where there is 
no condemnation of idolatry and no call to social justice, 
there can be no positive or prophetic ecumenical vision 
of unity orofpeace. The covenant communion upon which 
we enter dehberately claims and shall seek by God's grace 
to embody this understanding of what it means to be the 
body of Chnst in mission to the world. 



44) The Consultation desu-es that its unity in mission 
find expression in all three of these dimensions of mis- 
sion For the sake of the world, these churches wish to 
find occasions for worshipping together in covenant com- 
munion, and celebrating the euchanst together. For the 
sake of the world, they seek ways in which their procla- 
mation of the gospel may be made with one voice in 
covenant communion. For the sake of the world, they 
seek opportunities for acting together in the service of 
God's justice, peace and love in the world, that the unity 
and diversity of this covenant communion may be a sign 
to all people of God's redemptive will "to unite all things 
in Chnst, things in heaven and things on earth." 

Formation of Covenanting Councils 

45) Wherever covenanting occurs — nationally, region- 
ally, or locally — one of the inaugural covenanting acts 
will be the formation of a covenanting council in each such 
"place" The reason for doing this is that church unity will 
be neither visible nor organic if it is not embodied m 
tangible form. The church exists not alone in the mind. It 
takes up space on the earth. It can be seen. It can act, and 
be accountable for its actions. In a covenant communion 
of churches, therefore, it is essential that there be a 
company of persons who representatively give expres- 
sion and leadership to its common hfe. Such groups we 
refer to as covenanting councils. 

• 46) The primary purpose of these covenanting councils 
will be to enable the communion of churches in 
covenant. Several of their functions are of a distinctly 
ecclesial nature. By giving visible expression to the 
unity of the churches in covenant communion, the 
covenanting councils create the corporate ecclesial 
setting for the ordering of the covenanting ministries 
of bishops, presbyters, deacons, and lay persons. 
Among them are: 

• ordering the sacrament of Holy Communion in ways 
that are faithful to the Tradition as claimed in the 
covenanting agreements, and assembling the people 
&"om time to time to celebrate it as one; 

• enabling joint ordinations among all the covenanting 
churches in which reconciled bishops lay on hands with 
prayer together with the presence and participation of 
representative ordained and lay persons from as many 
of the covenanting churches as possible; 

• giving joint spiritual oversight (episkope) of the things 
which enable covenant communion among the 
churches, including; 

pursuit of inclusiveness, 
pursuit of a fuller embodiment within each 
church of the full vision of ministry' described 
in Chapter Vn of The COCU Comensus. 
provision of public occasions which visibly bear 
witness to unity in Christ, such as common 
baptisms, confirmations, ordinations, and other 
sacred occasions; 

• acting as one in the service of justice on 

behalf of all for whom justice is delayed 
or denied, doing so within existing 
ecumenical bodies where appropriate; and, 



Daily Edition Vol.3 No. 2 



• providing opportunity for shared decision-making in 
our common engagement in Christ's mission in the 
world. 

The covenanting councils may also be given other tasks 
which the participating churches find appropriate to give 
them. Covenanting councils will not have authonty over 
the churches. They will derive their authority to act from 
the judicatories which brought them into being. They will 
exercise a shared oversight of the covenanting process 
upon which the churches will enter. 

47) This list of functions makes clear that the primary 
focus of the covenanting process is the local worshiping 
community, gathered around the Word and sacraments, 
and giving expression to the church's missionary vocation 
in the world. It is the local covenanting council, more than 
the regional or the national, on which pnmary attention 
falls in the covenanting process, 

48) Local covenanting councils will exist to enable 
congregations of the covenanting churches, located in 
close proximity to one another (m the same town or in an 
urban or rural neighborhood) to live and act as one cove- 
nant communion in that place, even while maintaimng 
their distinct existences and traditions. Through a shared 
life of Word and sacrament, pubUcly confessing the one 
faith together, and served by ordained ministers who are 
fully reconciled and hence fully accessible to all, these 
congregations will be able to reach out in mission as one 
people of Christ in ways not possible before they entered 
into covenant communion. 

49) Regional covenanting councils bnng together 
representatively those judicatories of the covenanting 
churches where ordination and oversight is located. They 
are a collegial expression of shared oversight of the 
covenanting commitment of the churches, particularly in 
relation to the ordained ministries, congregations of the 
faithful, and common mission. Additionally, they facilitate 
formation of local covenanting councils, and encourage 
and assist those which have been formed. 

50) The national covenanting council will encourage 
regional judicatories to enter into covenanting, and will 
assist those that have been formed. It will invite other 
communions of Chnst's church to enter the covenant. 
The national covenanting council will provide a forum 
where churchwide concerns may be considered, includ- 
ing concerns that arise from local and regional covenant- 
ing experience. It will enable the churches to think 
together about matters of worship, including mutually 
acceptable hturgical norms for shared worship. It will 
enable churches to think together about matters of eccle- 
siastical pohty as each church seeks increasingly to em- 
body the vision of ministry contained in The COCU 
Consensus, in partnership with the other covenanting 
churches. Any necessary amendments to the two docu- 
ments embodying the basic agreements of the covenant 
communion shall be recommended to the participating 
churches by the national covenanting council. In sum, it 
will give collegial guidance to the covenanting process in 
matters of a general nature. 

51) The covenanting churches will continue to partici- 
pate fully m the life of other ecumemcal bodies. The 
relationships nurtured through the conciliar movement 
have done much to bring the covenantmg churches into 



closer relation with each other, and it is anticipated that 
the ecclesial depth of relationship among the covenanting 
churches will mean much to the conciliar movement as 
well. Councils of churches represent a broader constitu- 
ency than do the covenanting councils; hence, councils of 
churches will continue to be of great importance to the 
covenanting churches. It is intended that the relationship 
between covenanting councils and the councils of 
churches will be a cooperative, complementary, and mu- 
tually enriching one. It is intended that the funding and 
human resources now committed by the churches in their 
present separateness will not be eroded when they enter 
into covenant communion. Covenanting councils are not 
a substitute for councils of churches; rather, they give 
expression to a covenantal form of church union. 

52) Each covenanting council may be organized in such 
manner as seems appropriate to the consenting covenant- 
ing churches in that "place," provided only that the fol- 
lowmg basic agreements be observed: 

— covenanting councils shall be composed of elected 
representatives of churches which have formally entered 
into covenanting through affirmative action on The COCU 
Consensus and Churches tn Covenant Communion and 
through participation in the inaugurating liturgies of cove- 
nanting; 

— covenanting councils shall be composed in such a 
way as to be representative of the total ministry of the 
people of God, lay ministries as well as ordained minis- 
tries, within these churches; the churches, with appropri- 
ate consultation, will determine in what way their existing 
ministries will be represented in the councils, and the 
particular persons who will be sent to them; 

— covenanting councils shall be composed in such a 
way as to be inclusive of the diversity which God has given 
to the churches which form them. 

The size, organization, and frequency of meeting of the 
several covenanting councils, as well as their geographi- 
cal territories or boundaries, shall be determined in the 
joint discretion of the ecclesiastical bodies which form 
them in each "place." 

V. THE PROCESS OF COVENANTING 

1) The process of covenanting is intended to be imple- 
mented by the churches through a series of deliberate 
steps and stages. 

Claiming the Theological Consensus 

2) The first formal act of covenanting is for each church 
to claim The COCU Consensus: In Quest of a Church of 
Christ Uniting (1984). What that means specifically is 
stated in the foreword to that document, namely that each 
participating church is asked, by formal action, to recog- 
nize in it 

[1] an expression, in the matters with which it deals, of 
the Apostolic faith, order, worship, and witness of the 
Church, 

[2] an anticipation of the Church Uniting which the 
participating bodies, by the power of the Holy Spirit, wish 
to become, and 



April 17. 1996 



[3] a sufficient theological basis for the covenanting acts 
and the uniting process proposed at this time by the 
Consultation. 

The churches' action on these resolutions began in 
1986 It is expected that by 1989 all of the member 
churches of the Consultation will have had opportunity to 
consider and act upon them. 

Approving the Covenanting Proposal 

3) The second formal act of covenanting is for the 
participating churches to receive, study, and take formal 
action upon the document, Churches in Covenant Com- 
munion: The Church of Christ Uniting (1988). What that 
means specifically is stated in the resolution of transmittal 
of this document to the churches, issued by the 1988 
Plenary of the Consultation on Church Union (see Pref- 
ace). This document contains the essentials of the cove- 
nanting agreements, together with the liturgies by which 
the covenant is to be inaugurated. 

The Consultation Considers Next Steps 

4) After the participating churches have considered and 
acted upon the proposals of the Consultation contained in 
the two documents. The COCU Consensus and Churches 
in Covenant Communion, the Consultation on Church 
Union will carefully examine the actions of the churches 
on these recommendations, and determine next steps 
accordingly. No judgment has been made in advance 
regarding the number of churches that must approve the 
proposals in order for them to be implemented, nor on 
other questions concerning the nature of the churches 
actions upon them. Such matters will be addressed to- 
gether by the churches, through the Consultation on 
Church Union, after the participating churches have acted 
upon the proposals now before them. If the decision of the 
Consultation is that the actions of the churches justify 
implementation of the covenanting proposals as pre- 
sented, the following two sections of this chapter on "The 
Process of Covenanting" then apply. If the decision is 
other than that, the Consultation on Church Union in 
plenary session will itself determine what action to rec- 
ommend to the churches. 

Preparations to Implement Covenanting 

5) The fourth step in the covenanting process may be 
somewhat different for each church. It has to do with the 
particular preparations that each church will need to make 
in order to participate fully in the inaugurating liturgies 
of covenanting. Each church which takes affirmative ac- 
tion on the first two steps described above will then need 
to take other steps as promptly as possible, internal to its 
own polity, to prepare itself in what- ever ways it may 
deem to be necessary for the acts of recognition and of 
reconciliation which are described m the covenanting 
document and its accompanying hturgies. Specifically this 
could mean as many as four things; 



(a) discovering what categones of ordained ministry 
within one's polity correspond most closely to that of 
■'bishop," "presbyter," and "deacon" as described in the 
two documents named above; 

(b) making such amendment of one's polity or ecclesi- 
astical system as may be necessary — in good faith, in 
dialogue with other participating churches, and in the 
spirit of this covenantal commitment — in order: 

[1] to make possible the participation of one's church 
in a covenantal form of church union as here proposed, 

[2] to delegate to covenanting councils (upon their 
formation) sufficient authority to act in the ways de- 
scnbed in this document, 

[3] to make possible, through whatever changes may 
need to be made, full participation within the covenant 
communion of those who are to be put forward for recon- 
ciliation as covenanting bishops and presbyters — utiliz- 
ing the collegial processes of the Consultation on Church 
Union to assure mutual acceptability of these forms of 
ministry within the covenant communion of churches; 

(c) naming its representatives to the national service of 
covenanting, and its representatives to the national cove- 
nanting council which will be inaugurated soon thereafter; 
and 

(d) encouraging its regional bodies to name their rep- 
resentatives for participation in regional services of cove- 
nanting 

Participation in the Covenanting Liturgies 

6) The fifth step in the covenanting process is the act 
of consummating the new relationship of covenant com- 
munion amongthe churches. Each church will participate 
representatively in the liturgies of covenanting, by which 
covenant will be declared, ministries reconciled, cove- 
nanting councils inaugurated, and the Euchanst shared 
by all. The full text of these three liturgies is attached. 
These covenanting acts are parts of a single reaUty. 
Though they occur in three liturgical settings, each is 
integrally related to the others. These three liturgical 
actions are described as follows. 

7) The first will be the national service of declaring 
covenant. This liturgy will include an act of mutual recog- 
nition of each other as churches, together with an act for 
the reconciliation of a small but representative number of 
ordained ministers (a bishop, a presbyter, and a deacon) 
from each church. The primary services for the reconcili- 
ation of ordained ministries will be held later, in many 
regional and local settings: bishops wiU ordinarily be 
reconciled in regional liturgies, presbyters and deacons 
in local liturgies. The national liturgy, however, is chiefly 
focused upon the formal declaring of the covenant on 
behalf of the participating churches as a whole. Nonethe- 
less, in so doing, it will anticipate as well the reconciliation 
of ministnes which is to follow both there and elsewhere. 
The national service will not include an act for the inaugu- 
ration of a national covenanting council, but will instead 
express the commitment of the churches to do so later 
after recognition and reconciliation of ministry has oc- 



Daily Edition Vol.3 No. 2 



15 



curred in several regions. The liturgy for declaring cove- 
nant among the churches will conclude with the celebra- 
tion of the Lord's Supper, done in a manner that expresses 
the new relationship among the participating churches, 
under the leadership of a reconciled covenanting bishop 

8) The second liturgical action will be the regional service 
for the reconciliation of bishops. This action is intimately 
related to the first Therefore, the first of these regional 
services will occur in close conjunction with the national 
service. The choice of location for the national service will 
be in part made in light of the readiness of the middle 
judicatones of the covenanting churches in that place to 
enter promptly into the implementation of the covenant 
through the reconciliation of their ordained ministers of 
Tegiom\episkope. It is hoped that several of these regional 
services will be held immediately following the national 
service, perhaps simultaneously with one another at dif- 
ferent places across the country. The reconciliation of 
bishops will be accomplished through the mutual recogni- 
tion of one another's ministry of episkope and through a 
mutual laying on of hands among the bishops, together 
with other appropriate signs, and prayer. The regional 
service will include an act for the inaugurating of a regional 
covenanting council. The regional service will conclude 
with the celebration of the Holy Communion, done in a 
way that expresses the new relationship among the par- 
ticipating churches. 

9) The third liturgical action will be the local service for 
celebrating the covenant, for reconciling presbyters and for 
welcoming deacons and other ordained ministers of govern- 
ance. These local services will occur within regions where 
there has already been a regional service for the reconcili- 
ation of bishops. They will, of course, occur in many 
localities throughout the region. The first such local cele- 
bration may well occur on the same day as the regional 
service of reconciliation of bishops, and possibly in the 
same place. The local service will include an acknow- 
ledgment of the reconciliation of bishops that has occurred 
in that region. It will then move to the reconcihation of 
presbyters, this being essential to eucharistic fellowship. 
To that end, the liturgy will include the laying on of the 
hands of a reconciled bishop upon each of the presbyters 
there gathered, together with the giving of the hand of 
fellowship and other appropriate signs of welcome. 

10) The diaconal ministries of the churches are now so 
dissimilar to one another that a meaningful act of recon- 
ciliation into a single ministry of deacon is difficult to 
contemplate at this time. Nonetheless, every church does 
engage in diaconal ministry; some of these diaconal min- 
isters are ordained and others are unordained. So also, 
each church provides in some manner for the participation 
of other persons in ecclesial governance — persons vari- 
ously defined as Elders, members of the Vestry or of the 
Official Board. For some, these ministries of governance 
are an ordained office, and for others they are not. Hence, 
no meaningful act of reconciliation into a single ministry 
of governance can be effected at this time. Nonetheless, 
the local liturgy will include a public act for the mutual 
welcoming of all ordained deacons and all ordained minis- 
ters of governance within the shared hfe of the covenant 



communion of churches, but it will not include a liturgical 
act for the reconciliation of these varied ministries 

11) The service will include an act for the inauguration 
of a local covenanting council, and will be concluded with 
the celebration of the Eucharist, done in a way that ex- 
presses the new relationship among the participating 
churches. 

The Expanding Process of Covenanting 

12) It is not anticipated that covenanting will commence 
in all places at the same time. While the national church 
bodies will declare covenant and will proceed sometime 
thereafter to form a national covenanting council, regional 
church judicatories will in turn celebrate covenant, recon- 
cile rainistnes, and form a regional covenanting council 
when they are ready to do so. Even after the regional 
judicatories of the churches have entered into covenant- 
ing, groups of congregations within the region will cele- 
brate the covenant and form a local covenanting council 
when they are prepared so to do. Relationships can be 
encouraged but not compelled, 

13) For an indefinite penod, therefore, there may be 
some unevenness and indeed some anomaly in this cove- 
nant communion of churches. One may judge, however, 
that the anomaly will not be greater than the divisions 
which now fracture the one body and the one Table of 
Chnst. Covenanting provides a means whereby the Holy 
Spirit may draw the churches into an ever widening and 
deepening unity, where and when the Spirit wills. 



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April 17, 1996 



THE EPISCOPAL ADDRESS 
1996 

By Bishop Judith Craig 



The Grace and Peace of Jesus Christ be with you, 
sisters and brothers of the Household of Faith. 

Your Bishops greet you in the fresh and lively light of 
Easter Dawn that Hngers in these days of Eastertide. 

We come together in the presence of the Triune God. As 
God is Three, yet One, so we come from many cultures and 
expressions of faith, yet we are one in baptism and profes- 
sion of faith m Jesus Christ. 

Nothing reveals our unity more than having come to One 
Table this afternoon. At that Table we met the Risen Christ 
and each heard: "Take this ... do this . . . remember this." 
A lay woman. Amy Spencer, wrote a prayer for the Table: 
"Help me to understand that your words . . . (take, do, 
rememberj . are really an mvitation to know you, trust 
you and follow you " Let us thank God for the inviting Table 
Let us thank God for the rich and vaned ways we may 
respond according to our national origins, our unique tradi- 
tions, and our historic identities. With Amy let us pray that 
.IS a General Conference we will come to know Christ more 
deeply, trust Chnst more fully, and follow Chnst more 
faithfully in the conduct and completion of our work. 

United Methodists are part of a world fellowship. Our 
global nature is made visible by the largest number of 
delegates in our history from Central Conferences: one 
hundred thirty eight (138) delegates from the Annual Con- 
ferences in our six (6) Central Conferences. In addition 
there are ten (10) delegates from those with whom we have 
concordat relationship, thirty-three (33) from affiliated 
autonomous churches in the Methodist family, and two 
observers from Russia. 

In our Central Conferences we see our fastest numerical 
growth. At the end of 1994 the Central Conferences ac- 
counted for more than One and Half Million (1,500,000) of 
the worldwide ten million two-hundred thirty-six thousand, 
eight hundred thirty-five (10,236,835) members of United 
Methodism. This growth keeps giving birth to new annual 
conferences around the globe. Every day new professions 
of faith are made in chapels, house churches, cathedrals, and 
open air meetings around the world. The missionary enter- 
prise is truly global, with no one way streets, no sense of 
one part of the world sending and another receiving. We all 
send to each and each receives from all. 

We gather in a beautiful place where we can feel secure 
and comfortable. Here we have enough to eat, enough to 
wear. Some of us come from places in the world where 
security and comfort are a privilege restricted to the few. 
There danger stalks the daily walk of the many. Others live 
in places where freedom from war or disease is the usual. 
In those places the privilege of feeling secure and having 
more than enough for daily needs belongs to the majonty. 
Yet we confess a sad truth: No place in this world is safe 



from violence and disruption at the hands of those whose 
anger and frustration explode in destruction of life. 

Some of our delegates have left homes where wars 
rage, coming here not knowing what they will find when 
they return. Others have known the terror of violence 
in homes and cities and towns we do not usually think 
of as danger zones. Among us are Bishops who have 
escaped brushes with death and survived serious injury 
at the hands of violent people. And some — Bishops 
and delegates — are not here at all, caught in cross fire 
of battles at this moment and shut out of the United 
States for want of a visa. 

But here our relative sense of safety and comfort 
numbers us among the privileged of the world as we are 
free to debate and think and decide with honor for each 
and all. 

In our security, we dare not slip into a false sense of 
God abiding with us only. God is not confined in our 
assembly. God's attention is not limited to debates 
about order within The United Methodist Church. 
God's knowing and doing range far beyond us. God 
surely cares what we decide and how we decide. But 
God insists that our decisions embrace the creation plan 
for justice and life abundant for all the created order 
without limitation or exception. Our work here must 
manifest the justice and abundance envisioned by the 
Creator. 

May the peace ofChrist hold us as we are here. May 
the peace ofChrist go with us as we return to our homes 
near and far when the work of this General Conference 
is completed. 

The United Methodist Church is alive and well 
around the world. While many lament and wring their 
hands with worry and despair about the Church, there 
are signs of God at work all around us and within us. 
There is so much good in the Church, we could, in the 
words of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., "dig a tunnel of 
hope through every mountain of despair." 

Consider these signs: 

• Twenty-nine (29) persons have graduated from 
Africa University a bare six years after its beginnings. 
Now there are five faculties in place and enrollment 
in 1996 is three hundred (300). That University was 
a vision, birthed in a few inspired minds, caught by a 
General Conference and extended by a global 
community. It is the church alive, touching minds 
and hearts with knowledge and faith. 

• More than four hundred thousand (400,000) persons 
have finished one or more courses of Disciple Bible 



Daily Edition Vol.3 No. 2 



17 



Study. One seminary professor reports Disciple 
graduates bring a deepened foundation to their studies. 
The study is now in five languages — English, German, 
Korean, Spanish and Chinese. More than sixteen 
thousand (16,000) people are trained to lead. 

A series of spiritual growth movements is deepening 
faith and sharpening skills in Christian Hfe and witness 
They are reconnecting us to the almost lost prmciples of 
mutual accountability once at the heart of classes and 
bands. For instance, more than one-half million people 
have taken the Walk to Emmaus with more than twelve 
hundred (1,200) walks in 1995 alone. Covenant Disciple 
Groups and Wesley Classes are meeting m every Annual 
Conference in the United States. Four hundred twenty 
(420) persons benefitted from the two-year Academy of 
Spiritual Formation and Annual Conference Academies 
are springing up faster than they can be counted. The 
list is too long to catalogue. You add the specific 
movements and events that are part of our Church's 
response to the expression of a spiritual hunger resident 
among people around the world. 

In a majority of our Annual Conferences we hear with 
fresh urgency the questions: What is our pnmary task? 
Where does God call us to focus our resources in this 
age? They rise from initiatives bom in congregations 
and conference gatherings. They are prompted in some 
places by participation in Vision 2000 and forms of Quest 
for Quality. 

Three events have been held in the United States 
inviting youth and young adults to listen for a call from 
God to ordained and diaconal ministry. More than two 
thousand seven hundred (2,700) have attended. Many 
are responding "yes." The average age of seminary 
students in the United States is lowering each year. The 
number of students in seminaries and schools of 
ministry in the Central Conferences is increasing each 
year. 

The National Plan for Hispanic Ministry has taken wing. 
It is bringing into being new congregations. Through its 
energy we are training and deploying lay missioners, 
establishing faith communities, new outreach ministries 
and church schools. The report of this ministry is before 
the General Conference showing the measurable and 
hope-filled effect of an initiative of the 1992 General 
Conference. 

United Methodist presence is being experienced in 
places where we had scarcely been four years ago. 
Consider the Russia Initiative where new congregations 
gather for worship. Christian education and service 
because of United Methodist invitation. The initiative 
also fosters major work in medical, economic, 
educational, industrial and agricultural growth for the 
people of the region. 



Signs of hope are not limited to congregational life 
or work among the membership of The United Meth- 
odist Church. 

• The Church has been a voice for freedom, quietly 
and openly working against oppression in 
government and seeking to bring justice to people 
without a voice. Consider the Christian witness in 
South Afi-ica through the dismantling of apartheid — 
the Middle East, where the Christian voice is small, 
but effective in giving hope — and Eastern Europe, 
where Christian communities survived forty years 
of oppression and being cut off from brothers and 
sisters in the rest of the world. 

• Four years ago the General Conference set aside its 
agenda for a day to address a crisis of anger and 
destruction in one of the cities of North America. A 
vision was set forth. In the intervening years that 
vision has taken specific form. By the end of 1995 
there were ninety-five (95) established or 
developing Shalom Zones on record. 

• In the last four years over one-hundred three 
thousand (103,000) people participated in Volunteer 
in Mission events in forty-six (46) countries, 
supported by over thirty-eight million, 
eight-hundred thousand dollars ($38,800,000). 

• And how shall we count contacts with legislators, 
letters written to influence public policy, 
information and testimony given to offer Christian 
perspective on decisions that affect the course of 
nations and communities? All that activity is also a 
sign of vital life among the Church's people. Such 
active discipleship brings the Gospel to bear on 
issues that shape the life of persons who may or may 
not be part of the Church of Jesus Christ, but are still 
the concern of God. 

In all these signs of hope we see a marvelous linking 
of individual disciples, congregations, districts, confer- 
ences, and general boards and agencies. Signs of hope 
show the connection at work, doing together what we 
cannot do alone. 

Is the Church alive? Does evangelizing bear fruit? 
All around us are stories of lives resurrected with 
ethical strength and moral toughness, of hope kindled 
in the face of despair, of generosity in spite of shrinking 
resources. 

You know the signs. You are the signs. You know 
the stories. We urge you: tell them to each other. As 
you walk to and from meetings, as you have meals, as 
you share refreshments, tell the stories of the Church 
alive and shaping the world's peoples. 

Signs of hope evidence evangelical fervor. 
Evangelizing is die natural outgrowth of knowing the 
Gospel. We receive to give away. The Gospel is 



April 17, 1! 



effective if it is on the tip of our life-tongues — in both talk 
and walk 

Our zeal to invite through example and exhortation must 
be motivated by more than a desire to effect membership 
numbers. If that is our only goal, we will know disappoint- 
ment and be counted as unfaithful. Numerical growth is a 
by-product of spiritual growth which is the sign of faithful 
evangelizing To evangelize is to tell about Jesus Christ, 
crucified and nsen, reconciling the tattered world to the 
healing Creator's love. We must not truncate evangehsm 
by limiting it to any sectarian definitions or motives other 
than compassionate, inclusive announcement of God's re- 
deeming love. Our discipleship is defective if we try to limit 
God's encircling embrace of grace to those we judge accept- 
able. 

As part of learning to be faithful evangels, we urge our 
people to examine their relationships in congregational and 
personal life. If the Chnstian community is consumed with 
conflict and arguments about power and control, the Body 
of Chnst is fractured and ministry impeded. How tragic to 
hear persons say, "I would be more interested in Christian 
faith if I didn't see the way church people treat each other." 
Our baptism means we have put on Christ. Let us be sure 
our actions reveal the weanng of Christ lest our sacraments 
become a hollow shell of false religion. Let us make sure 
those who wait to hear good news are not deafened by 
contradiction in our profession and practice. 

The heart of the Gospel reaches beyond relationship of 
persons to Chnst and Chnst to Church. The Gospel is the 
expression of the Grace of God which intends social justice 
m the whole society of humankind and all of nature. To 
separate the salvation message from a call to justice, both 
within and beyond the communities of congregations, di- 
minishes the thrust and energy of the Evangel. The whole 
Good News is ours to proclaim in word and act. Individuals, 
institutions and systems must be redeemed to free persons 
from any imprisonment that would deny the abundant life 
bought through a terrifying cross and an empty tomb. 

We have so much for which to shout Hallelujah! At the 
same time, we are deaf if we do not hear underneath our 
shouting the groans and screams of a creation in pain. We 
learn from the Psalmist the strength of lament, a mixture 
of weeping and praising. The Psalmist was so sure of a 
listening, responding God as to dare to say it all: that which 
was cause for great joy and that which confounded and 
wounded. As the Psalmist, we live in a world that celebrates 
freedom even as it weeps because it is caught in the webs 
of pain and sin still begging for the news of redemption. 

Look at God's world into which the Incarnate One came 
and comes to reconcile and redeem and bnng life abundant. 



FILM IMAGES PAIN AND HOPE. 



Images of God's people in God's world. They leave us 
with so much to mourn and so much to celebrate. 

What has the agenda of this General Conference to 
do with the images we have seen, with the global con- 



cerns of God? How will our debates and decisions 
make visible the Body of Christ in the midst of crea- 
tion's joy and wounds? The wind of God's spint sweeps 
across places of deprivation, violence, fear and denial 
of dignity. We must welcome that wind blowing us to 
decisions and lives that reveal the reign of God, 

We labor here in response to the Creator who looked 
on all that was made and said, "Behold,itis very good." 
That same Creator now weeps over impoverished cit- 
ies and villages, ravished lands, polluted streams, de- 
pleted soil, poisoned air, fractured humanity. The 
weeping God beckons us to become God's healing 
presence in human communities and all the created 
order. 

Humankind has lost its sense of reverence. We see 
the loss when hfe is robbed of meaning and dignity by 
unequal opportunity and unjust distribution of the basic 
goods that sustain life. The poor rise in number and 
sink in despair as political and economic systems con- 
tinue to protect the comfort of the few at the expense 
of the many. Poverty stnps human beings of their 
dignity and robs them of hope for the abundant life our 
Gospel promises. The Gospel of Jesus Chnst stands 
against the forces that hold people in the captivity of 
poverty. 

Loss of reverence relentlessly assaults the young of 
the world. Children are abused by images of careless- 
ness with life. They both see and experience that 
carelessness daily. Our young are hungry and mal- 
nounshed. They are dislocated and orphaned by war. 
They are held hostage to the power struggles of people 
without conscience. Children are scarred and de- 
formed by systems that do not give first attention to 
their need for shelter, safety, education and nurture. 
The terror of carelessness with the lives of children is 
real in every nation, from the poorest and war torn to 
the nchest where no declared wars are fought. Do you 
know the United States is the only industriahzed coun- 
try in which children are the largest segment of the 
population who lives in poverty? 

Loss of reverence touches youth in their teens. A 
generation is at peril, hungry for help in standing over 
against the temptation to instant gratification and the 
altering of reality with drugs and alcohol. Their sense 
of future is blocked by walls of economic and educa- 
tional limitations, bhnding them to opportunity and 
inviting short-term goals that undermine long-term 
well-being. Values and morals are challenged and 
twisted by alternative views of life that are inconsistent 
with the Gospel vision. 

As a Council of Bishops, we believe the Church can 
offer no more powerful sign of steward responsibiUty 
than making the welfare of children and youth the first 
concern. They are the ones who will inherit the wmd 
of our terror or the nurtunng breeze of our care. Their 
needs are the most urgent cries to which we must 
respond quickly and without reserve. To that end we 
urge this General Conference to keep the image of the 
most powerless of people — the poor, children, youth, 



Daily Edition Vol.3 No. 2 



women — always in the forefront as we do the work given 
us to do. 

In the very near future your Bishops will be inviting you 
to major attention through an Episcopal Initiative address- 
ing issues of children and poverty. All else we do will be 
wasted if we do not engage in shaping the future so that it 
offers Hfe abundant instead of squeezing life out of the next 
generations. 

As we think about what is now, we are aware also 
of the future coming toward us. This General Confer- 
ence convenes on the threshold of a new millennium. A 
thousand years ago United Methodism had not been bom 
The second millennium has witnessed radical changes in 
how we speak of the faith. Our ancestors ordered the 
household of faith through reform after reform in that thou- 
sand years. Now we are they whose privilege and respon- 
sibility It IS to think "long thoughts" after the fashion of God 
as we position The United Methodist Church for the third 
millennium . How we do our work must be influenced by this 
sense of time. We are gifted with an urgency and potential 
unhke anything given to previous generations. Some say 
that the revolutions of knowing and human comprehension 
facing us in the next thousand years will dwarf anything that 
occurred in the thousand years now ending. For mstance, 
neuroscientists and linguists are unlocking the mysteries of 
how language is formed in ways that will revolutionize 
teaching and communication. Encounters with such revolu- 
tions are not new for the Church. Expanding knowledge 
has always called the Church to join in new expression and 
encounters with emerging truths. The Church has not been 
static in the last Millennium. Ways of speaking the faith and 
intersecting with life issues have developed and shifted 
according to God's continuing revelation. 

We sing, "as it was in the beginning, is now and ever shall 
be. . ." We proclaim God's word, "Behold, I make all things 
new." They are two phrases of one truth. What has always 
been is that God is always making things new. 

In fact. United Methodists are the inheritors of major 
intrusions into the understanding of Church. It was a revo- 
lution when John Wesley dared to take preaching to the 
streets and open fields, declaring faith empty if not accom- 
panied with insistence on justice. Listen to these words 
from Mr. Wesley's diaries: 

"Saturday, March 31. In the evening I reached Bristol and 
met Mr. Whitfield there. I could scarce reconcile myself at 
first to this strange way of preaching in the fields . . . having 
been all my life (till very lately) so tenacious of every pomt 
relatmg to decency and order, that I should have thought 
the saving of souls almost a sin if it had not been done in a 
church." 

Such a scandal, Mr. Wesley! But preach he did, in those 
unorthodox ways, often using the text from Luke: "The 
Spint of the Lord is upon me ... to proclaim Good News to 
the poor ..." One story carries the memory of an angry 
crowd throwing empty whiskey bottles at Mr. Wesley. A 
woman whose stature was considerably more expansive 
than that of the slight Mr. Wesley strode out of the crowd, 
stood before him, and threatened all who would further 
assault, saying, "Let the little man preach." 



Oh yes, we are the inheritors of radical breaks in 
tradition and revolutions in ways of being "church." 
Our faith and it's practice are not frozen in time or 
space. What we do and say reveals whether or not we 
stand in continuity with what is always the same — the 
new and far reaching activity of God. 

God's continuing revelation requires us to 
claim what we already know and keep listening 
for what God has yet to teach us about divine 
grace and its reach. Some look at us and wonder how 
we can pronounce the limitless grace of God and then 
call together huge assemblies to define who and what 
falls beyond that limitless grace. The church we order 
must be an open house where Jesus sits at the doorway 
and welcomes all who come, regardless of whether the 
townspeople think it proper or not! It is an offense to 
God to define so carefully and describe church so rigidly 
as to create a family tree that says most clearly who is 
not welcome. It is unfaithful to focus so much on our 
own internal life that we have nothing left to give as 
moral leaders and stewards of the whole of God's 
creation. 

God watches us, perhaps with Divine angst, to see 
if we who claim to be faithful will indeed act faithfully. 
The poor, the oppressed, the young and the old listen 
for the Word spoken in language they can comprehend 
and recognize in actions that reach their needs. Can we 
speak God's forgiving, nurturing Word in 21st Century 
languages and practices? 0, please God, make us able 
to answer with a resounding "Yes!" 

We move toward the new millennium as part of 
a wounded world. We are ourselves a wounded 
community. Our wounds, sign of sin still resident 
within us, cry out for healing. When they are healed, 
our message of redeeming hope will have integrity and 
power in the larger human community among whom 
God places us. Our announcement of reconciliation 
begins with confession of those places in our personal 
and institutional hves wherein we are not reconciled. 
Our invitation to holiness is accompanied by a fresh 
determination to live holy lives ourselves. Our call to 
justice includes ordering life within our own body in 
ways that are just. 

We mark forty years of benefitting from the gifts of 
women as elders in full conference membership. That 
gift nses out of a century of history, dating back to the 
ordination of women as elders in the United Brethren 
Church as early as 1889. 

We celebrate thirty years of having removed from 
our midst the scandal of formal segregation in the 
Central Jurisdiction. All our legislation and covenant 
agreements testify that racism and sexism are sins that 
must not live in Christ's Church. 

Sadly, we know legislation does not guarantee prac- 
tice. It is difficult to find words to express our outrage 
at continuing discrimination against women and people 
of racial ethnic heritage. It lingers in every circle of the 
church's life. An unrelenting migration toward homo- 
geneity unmasks a myopic vision of God's nchly di- 



20 



April 17, 1996 



verse creation. The exclusion of persons because of race, 
gender or status of any kind flies in the face of God's 
intention to embrace all who name the name of Jesus. 
Allowing congregations to participate m sinftil patterns of 
discrimination surrounding them is faithless sinking into 
the ways of culture rather than shaping culture according 
to God's creation plan 

We call all who bear the name of Chnst — Umted Meth- 
odist Bishops included — to confess the sad truth that we 
continue to participate in institutions and practices that 
favor Caucasians and males in overt and covert systemic 
exclusion. Let us repent that we may be led to just behavior. 

We are grieved and puzzled by the rising number of 
allegations of clergy sexual misconduct. That so many of 
our covenant community seem insensitive and irresponsi- 
ble about appropriate relationships and pastoral propriety is 
cause for lament. We join you in seeking to create just ways 
to respond. 

We know the crucial distmction between the sure re- 
deeming love of God for all who sin and the requirements 
that make one worthy of the sacred trust of the office given 
with consecration and ordination. We insist that those who 
carry the precious pnvilege of ordination and consecration 
maintain the exemplary lifestyle required by the call of 
Christ and affirmation of the Church. 

Our ways of responding to clergy misconduct must evi- 
dence swift, just and gentle care for all the aggrieved — the 
ones primarily wounded, those in secondary and tertiary 
circles of disruption, and the wounders themselves. We 
cannot ignore or be inconsistent in our response to this 
offense in the Church. 

God's gift of sexuality is good! Even as we claim that 
creation truth, our cultures are bombarded with twisted and 
demeanmg exploitation of sexuality — pornography, prom- 
iscuity, the breakdown of covenant relationships. Within 
the Church our struggle to understand the expression of 
human sexuality has become painful and divisive. 

We yearn for a holy community that embraces sexuality 
as a good gift of creation rather than something about which 
to be embarrassed or to interpret and define in ways that 
exclude persons from full participation in the life of the 
Church. In cultures saturated with images, abuses and 
excesses that belittle and demean holy intimacy, the Church 
is the only community with the possibility of teaching the 
strength of the divine blessing on human bonding and fidel- 
ity. 

We affirm the sanctity of marriage. At the same time we 
are called by a gracious Christ to five with a spirit of welcome 
for persons of many reaUties and persuasions. We have 
much to learn about our human nature and what it means to 
be created in the image of God. Let us bind ourselves in 
common search for God's continuing revelation about Di- 
vine creation intention, especially the meaning and employ- 
ment of the beautiful gift of our sexuality. 

How shall we respond to the woundedness around 
and among us? So much of life waits for the healing touch 
of the Gospel. Sometimes it is mediated through human 
institutions, in systems and structures by which life is 
ordered. The General Conference is responsible for pro- 
viding order and visible fi:amework for United Methodism. 



That organization makes possible our carrying the 
Gospel's healing touch. 

We are a people who value structure. We understand 
the strength of bemg connected with each other in 
orderly fashion that allows the flow of resources and 
the linking of gifts. Any decisions that weaken the 
coherence of that connection threaten the urgency of 
solidarity in witness and practice m a fractured world. 
So much in life suffers fi^om discontinuity and discon- 
nection. Our connection — manifested in structural 
coherence that is recognizable from place to place — is 
a sign of healthy wholeness. It is the means by which 
we are in ministry together where no one part of us can 
be effective alone. 

We urge consciousness of that wholeness in your 
deliberations. Frequently ask: if we decide this way 
here, how will our decision effect what is being consid- 
ered somewhere else? Let us never forget our linkage 
as a corporate body. Our language, our customs, our 
dreams, our desires are each shaped and worthy in 
their own time and place. Yet all together are the 
strands on a divine loom that become a tapestry of the 
Living Christ made visible through the likes of you and 
me — connected and united. 

Remember United Methodists are part of the whole 
Body of Christ, in relationship with persons who live in 
other rooms in the grand Household of Faith. Our unity 
with other communions in councils of churches and 
covenant relationships moves us toward God's vision 
of the Church made whole. What we decide about our 
way of being faithful must be appropriate to ourselves 
and our tradition. At the same time we must demon- 
strate respect for our kindred of other Christian tradi- 
tions and self-understandings. 

The Council of Bishops has put before you the oppor- 
tunity to place United Methodists in formal relationship 
to Churches in Covenant Communion. We urge you to 
debate and act in light of the world's need to see and 
hear a unified witness to Christ. 

World consciousness and ecumenism are the twin 
templates within which to perfect legislative proposals. 
Let no continent or clan pretend any weight of authority 
that denies the unique energy of all nations and peoples. 
Rather, let the uniqueness of culture and continent 
enhance the beautiful unity of common heritage and 
practice as United Methodists. 

One way our common heritage and practice is made 
visible is in ordering ministry for service through the 
Church. Four years ago you entrusted the Council of 
Bishops with the Study of Ministry. You asked us to 
undertake our work in a spirit of prayer and discern- 
ment. We have sought to be faithful to that task. 
Before you is a document overwhelmingly commended 
by the Council of Bishops. We ask you to consider the 
proposals about the ordering of ministry in the same 
prayerful and discerning spirit which we have sought 
to follow. 

We are a people of The Word, the TbeHaiy Bible. 
We gather to write two books: The Book ofDisapline 
and The Book of Resolutions. Those we write must 



Daily Edition Vol.3 No. 2 



21 



never take the place of the first. Our books must not 
interpret and order life in any way contrary to the always 
fresh and contemporary Word of God. Therein lies the 
tension of our work — an ancient body of truth guiding a 
contemporary and emerging expression of new things God 
is doing. We stand in between what God has done and what 
God will do next. We can be dams of self interest and 
polluted channels of selfish motives that block and foul the 
pure force and creative energy of God's will. Or we can be 
open doors and clean vessels through which God pours 
continuing Divine intervention into creation. 

"In-between-ness" is as old as Scripture. We are told to 
remember who made us, who delivered us. what God has 
taught. At the same time we are told to follow the God who 
makes all things new, who is always doing a new thing. 
Jesus stood in between, saying "You have heard it said of 
old — but — I say to you ..." When we gathered at The Table 
earlier today, we were m between: "Do this to remember 
me . until the reign of God comes." In-between-ness is 
our location in faith 

Wonderful discoveries break into our hves with speed 
that takes our breath away. Knowledge and ways of com- 
municating unlike anything we imagined in our first decades 
of life are now commonplace to those bom after us We 
stand in between generations. One was raised on pnnted 
pages. The other knows the flicker of computer screens 
One talks of truth in images that are static and contained in 
books. The other interacts with people around the globe, 
encountering truth in cultures and faith expressions that are 
dynamic and mutually enriching. One generation talks 
about the nuts and bolts of life. The other speaks in lan- 
guages of bits and bytes. We are truly in between revolu- 
tions and revelations, right where the Church has always 
been. Our memory of God is tested in between. 

I heard a story of a four-year-old girl into whose family 
was bom a baby brother. From the day her parents brought 
him home she began to ask for some time alone with him. 
The parents were reluctant, not sure just what she would 
do with him. Finally they relented to her persistent insis- 
tence. One evening they told her she could go mto the 
nursery after he had been put to bed, and there be alone 
with him. They shut the door, then cracked it ajar and 
watched as she went near the crib, bent down and spoke. 
She said to her baby brother, "Tell me what God looks like 
I am beginning to forget." 

The long look requires remembering what we have al- 
ways known, but leaming it in forms and images that are 
appropriate to our time and place. 

When we sing, "0 God our help in ages past, our hope 
for years to come . . . ," we offer a unique gift of assurance 
that steadies those whirling in the excitement of unfolding 
revelation. A Church truly faithful to Christ will not be 
obsolete in the new millennium. The Church knows the 
Source of all that is coming to light. Our voice is essential, 
our understanding central, our confidence basic for the 
well-being of the world in the future as it has been in the 
past. 

The 1996 General Conference comes to life in a birth- 
roora hill of what could become destructive controversy. It 
is always appropriate to examine our beliefs and engage 



each other in an earnest search for each generation's 
form of expression and confession. It is troublesome if 
the engagement scatters seeds of dissension and de- 
struction among seeds meant to germinate in abundant 
new life for a new century. 

We have watched with alarm tensions that rise out 
of good desire to protect the Church from harm. We 
fear the desire to protect may turn to desire to control. 
We urge you to tune in to the wind of the Holy Spirit, 
letting it drown out the sound and fury of human 
insistence. We exhort you to approach the work of this 
General Conference embracing a holy tension: remem- 
benng what God has done and expecting God to do 
something new. 

A question confronts us: How can we faithfully guard 
the irreducible tenets of faith-filled tradition without 
confining God in any one creed or confession in human 
language? 

Let us repent of our pretentious assumptions that 
human language and time-encrusted traditions can 
contain the omnipotent, omnipresent Holy One. The 
Apostolic faith is ours to enjoy, to give away, and to 
which to invite others. The Apostolic faith is not locked 
in expressions or experiences of the Apostolic Centu- 
nes. It IS sufficiently strong to be flexible in expression 
and expenence to be offered in language and form 
appropriate to all time, including the new Century we 
approach. 

We are not suggesting a cavalier setting aside of 
valued and valid tradition. We embrace Trinitarian 
faith and hold to the centrahty of the Incamation, Aton- 
ing Death, and Resurrection of Jesus Christ. At the 
same time, we acknowledge the limitations of human 
formulations and rites to express those unchanging 
truths. Language and rituals that have been sufficient 
in the past may not be heard with convicting force in 
the now and the future. God's Spirit sweeps over the 
earth searching for expression to transcend tradition, 
gender, race, and nation. 

Opposing temptations beckon us. One is to go on to 
new things disregarding tradition altogether. The other 
is to stand so rigidly in tradition as to believe we simply 
must make what once was happen again. While some 
retreat into memory, others tend to run ahead as if 
suffering amnesia. It is for us to find the balance in 
between, guided by the Holy Spirit who sets us free of 
partisanship. 

We who are your Bishops believe that what you 
decide and order will make a difference in how both the 
Church and world recognize the continuing revelation 
of God among us and through us. So crucial and rele- 
vant do we believe your work to be that we issue an 
invitation. 

We invite you to Holy Conferencing.. We urge 
you to claim with confidence our rich heritage that 
trusts God to offer wisdom through the gathering of 
varieties of thought and convictions in conferencing. 
We believe debate can be prayerful expression, honor- 
ing the Holy resident among all and within each. It is 



April 17, 1996 



possible to disagree with another's ideas while still claiming 
oneness in Christ. That flavor is what we hunger for in this 
General Conference. 

We invite you to step out of party spirit and walk together 
in Holy Spirit. We urge you to turn from being slaves to 
predetermined agendas, no matter how thoughtfully and 
prayerfully prepared, to a free embrace of the will of the 
One to whom we belong. We invite you, we urge you, to 
remember where we began: at the Table. We invite you to 
create an atmosphere of hospitality and mutual respect that 
comes from shanng around that Table. 

About a year and half ago I sat in a Bedouin tent outside 
the city of Jerusalem. There some Christians, some Is- 
raelis and Bedouin Muslims sat around a rug which was, for 
our hosts, a table Around that rug-table Bedouins gather 
for talk and decision making. Around that rug-table they 
gather to eat. At that rug-table they asked us to sit as they 
told us their story of persecution and hope. Surrounded by 
the dust of the Judean hills, we sat at the Table. The Elder 
of the tribe did not speak until children had appeared out of 
the brown dust with sparkhng clean glasses on a polished 
copper tray. They earned a bright blue pot out of which they 
poured the hot, sweet, strong tea of the Middle East. As we 
each took a glass and drank together, the barriers of culture, 
language, and faith began to fall. We found ourselves enter- 
ing into the stories of each other's dreams and hopes. 
Tables tumble barriers and bridge distances between peo- 
ple. 

Just so we began at the Table. We took broken bread and 
drank from one cup. This unique Table is central to our 
faith. From the Table we learn what God means to do — 
re-member the dis-membered order of life. In fact, Jesus 
told us to do just that — re-member him, put together again 
the wholeness of God's presence in this world. At the Table 
we receive the invitation to bring Christ's broken body back 
together and to offer Christ's spilled blood to salve the 
wounds of the world. 

The Table stands in between the old and new covenants, 
bringing together as one movement the continuing activity 
of the God of all covenants. At the Table one part of God's 
salvation drama is completed as another waits to be reahzed 
in the future. 

There were tensions at the table where the twelve sat 
with their Teacher Jesus named his betrayer. The disci- 
ples quarreled among themselves about greatness. Jesus 
had to remind them about servanthood. But Jesus stayed at 
that table. He sat there in the midst of that broken commu- 
nity and gave them a sign of healing and wholeness. 

In times of conflict and differing opinion what does it 
mean to stay at the Table? We believe all that we do can be 
transformed toward God's will if we will stay at the Table. 
Our invitation is to heed the call of the Table to re-member 
lest we pass by on our own way still dis-membenng the 
Body of Christ. 

The delegates to this General Conference were invited 
to prayer, using a common daily guide for the forty days 
preceding our gathering. It made us one before we saw each 
other. Your Bishops now offer a specific sign of continuing 
prayer. Members of the Council of Bishops will be in prayer 
around the clock for the duration of this General Confer- 
ence. We have designated teams of prayer partners who 
will intercede for all of us, asking the Holy Spirit to intrude 



mto all we dream and propose, all we say and decide. 
We will identify the interecessors each day and the 
place where they are in prayer. Others may join them 
there, or in one of the other chapels, or a place of your 
own choosing. We invite all to join us in making this 
entire General Conference a season of prayer. 

In the same spirit, we ask that each time you gather 
in a legislative committee, in a caucus meeting, in 
plenary, you begin with five minutes of reflecting with 
another person — perhaps someone you do not know 
well — speaking about these two questions: 1) What is 
my most earnest hope for the next few hours of this 
General Conference? 2) What do I believe is God's 
most fervent hope for these next few hours? Then we 
ask you to pray with that conversation partner beseech- 
ing God to brmg the two hopes into one. We go to our 
discipline of intercessory prayer with confidence God 
will break in with energy, wisdom and joy. We invite 
you to your moments of self-revelation and search, 
equally confident that God will bless the Church and 
the world through a General Conference earnestly 
praying and listening for God's guidance. May it be so, 
in the name of Christ. 

We are confident you will respond readily and 
eagerly to this wrapping of our Conferencing in the 
mantle of prayer. We are confident you will do your 
holy work of conferencing always aware of being at the 
Table with Jesus. As sign of our mutual covenant to do 
so, let us sing a prayer to undergird all we do in these 
days as the General Conference of The United Meth- 
odist Church in the Year of our Lxjrd, 1996. 

Dear Jesus, in whose life I see 

All that I would, but fail to be, 

Let thy clear light forever shine, 

To shame and guide this life of mine. 



Though what I dream and what I do 

In my weak days are always two, 

Help me, oppressed by things undone, 

thou whose deeds and dreams were one. 

Amen. 

The Episcopal Address has been written by Bishop 
Judith Craig who was selected by the Council of Bish- 
ops. It has been perfected for presentation at the 1996 
session of the General conference after considerable 
preparation, including discussion and debate at regular 
meetings of the Council of Bishops. Though not reflect- 
ing the view of every bishop at every point, in finished 
form this address has been approved by the Council of 
Bishops of the United Methodist Church. 



lTOM \6mjO 



Roy rr^ano 
President 



Melvm G. Talbert 
Secretary 



Daily Edition Vol.3 No. 2 



23 



Council of Bishops 
NOMINATIONS 



GENERAL COUNCIL ON MINISTRIES 

(Three persons from Central Conferences, to be nomi- 
nated by the Council of Bishops and elected by the General 
Conference on Ministnes TI1007.1a[7]). 
l.Clergy: Oystetn Olsen (Norway) 
2.Laywoman: Franelli Pableo (Philippines) 
3.Layman: Solomon Chiripasi (Zimbabwe) 
4.Altemate clergy: Patrick Streiff 
S.Altemate laywoman: Marilina de Carvalho 
GAltemate layman. David Caypuno (Philippmes) 

GENERAL BOARD OF DIS CIPLE S HIP 
(Elect from Central Conferences; one shall be a woman 

111204.1), 
l.Clergy; Dons Lenga-Kroma {Siem Leone) 
2.Layperson: Anselmo Lupdag (Philippines) 

GENERAL BOARD OF GLOBAL MINISTRIES 

Three persons from each Central Conference; one 
clergy, one laywoman and one layman. To be elected by 
each Central Conference (111412.6). 

LAfrica: 

Clergy: GiftMachinga 

Laywoman: Mrs. Poto (Akasa) Umembudi 

Layman: Willas Makombe 

2.West Africa 
Clergy: James D. Karblee 
Laywoman: Leah Olusiyi 
Layman: Abraham K. Sellu 

3. Central and Southern Europe 
Clergy; Peter Siegfried 
Laywoman: EvaCsemak 
Layman: No nomination 

4.Germany 

Clergy: Friedhelm Kober 
Laywoman; Krimhild Sieweck 
Layman: Thomas Kemper 

5.Northem Europe 
Clergy; Lars Eric Pettersson 
Laywoman; LailaHorby 
Layman; Anton Zakharchenko 

6.Philippines 
Clergy; Francisco Bilog 
Laywoman; Liz Pajaro Mariano 
Layman; Alejandrino Valera 



GENERAL COUNCIL ON FINANCE AND ADMINI- 
STRATION 



A.Nine members at large (11905.1) nominated by the 
Council of Bishops and elected by the General Confer- 
ence. 

l.Lenora Thompson (E PA)NE 

2.John I^oo(in# (Central IL)NC 

3 Eugene Matthews (Balt.-WA.)NE 

4.Jay Brim (SW TX)SC 

S.Eunice Sato (CA-Pacific)W 

6.Mary Ellen Bullard (AL/W FL)SE 

IDavtd OrendorffQATW 

SElvyn Hamilton (KY) (under age 30)SE 

9.Henning Bjemo (Denmark)CC 

Youth under 18 at time of election; 
1. Shawn Hartman (Central PA)NE 

B.To be nominated by the Jurisdictional Colleges 
(11905.1) and elected by the General Conference. 
NORTH CENTRAL 
l-Stan Sutton (W OH) 
2.David Aubuchon (E OH) 
3. Barbara Ullman (Detroit) 
4£ertie Hakeem ( (N IL) 
SPatricia Hinker (MN) 
e.BiU White (WI) 

NORTHEASTERN 
IPhil Wogaman (Balt-WA) 
2 Robert Fishel (New England) 
3.LarryJohnson(WVA) 
4.Tracy Merrick (W PA) 
5.Gail Scott (Wyoming) 
e.Lucille Dockery (NY) 

SOUTH CENTRAL 
lAaron Black (NB) 
2.Mona May Waymire (OK) 
3. Marilyn Lloyd (Little Rock) 
4.Weldon Mackie (MO E) 
b.Vtrgilio Vazquez-Garza (SW TX) 
G.Stanley Sager (NM) 

SOUTHEASTERN 
l.Cashar Evans (NC) 
2.Taylor Phillips (S GA) 
2,Ue Sheaffer (VA) 
ALawrence Dill HI (N AL) 
S.Richard Kelly (N AL) 
e.Connie Mitchell (KY) 

WESTERN 

l.Melvin Brawn (CA-Nev) 

2Edsel White (Pacific NW) 

3.Tom Bentley (Desert SW) 

ARobert Smith {C\-?zc) 

S.Peggy Sewell (Rocky Mtn.) 

6.KayWolf(0R-ID) 



24 



April17, 1996 



GENERAL BOARD OF CHURCH AND SOCIETY 
Elect from Central Conferences upon nomination by the 

Central Conference College of Bishops. One shall be a 

woman (111106). 

l.Clergy Edward Pusleckt (Poland) 
2.Layraan: Rudolfo Beltran (Phihppmes) 
3.Laywoman: Helen Byholt Thorsen (N Europe) 

GENERAL BOARD OF PENSION AND HEALTH 

BENEFITS 

To be nom mated by the Council of Bishops and elected 

by the General Conference (111602. la) 

I.Joel Huffman (Desert SW)W 

2Liither W Henry (Central TX)SC 

"iKermtt BraswellQiO'SE 

4.Mary Miller (SIN)NC 

S.Herbert Smith (TX)SC 

6.John English (NJ)NE 

GENERAL COMMISSION ON ARCHIVES AND HIS- 
TORY 

Nominated by the Council of Bishops (111894.2) and 
elected by the General Conference. 

IJohn Baker-Batsel (Rocky Mtn.)W 

IRalph Blanks (E PA)NE 

2, Michelle Grube (ME)NE 

Ajoseph Lasley (WNC)SE 

^Richard O'Neil (WI)NC 

6L0UIS Piel (Peninsula)NE 

7. John Piper{Ccntra\ PA)NE 

S.Russell Richcy (W NC)SE 

9 Robert Rosas (Pacific NW)W 

lO.Emilie Sims (Central IL)NC 

ll.(Mrs.) Gerry ReiffSE 

12.Harold Batiste Jr. (SW TX)SC 

13.Michel Weyer (Germany)CC 



COUNCIL OF BISHOPS 

NOMINATIONS TO GENERAL CONFERENCE COM- 
MITTEES 

STANDING ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEES OF 
THE GENERAL CONFERENCE 
Committee on Agenda 

l.North Central: Carolyn Johnson 

2.Northeastem.' Sarah S. Miller 

3. South Central: Nancy Carruth 

4. Southeastern: Allen Norris 

S.Westem: Elaine Stanovsky 

6. Central Conferences: Eke Halloway 

y.Coordinator of Calendar: Fitzgerald Reist 

S.Chair, Program Committee: William Quick 



Committee on Calendar 
l.North Central: Mary Good 
2.Northeastem: Deborah Cromn 



3.South Central: Nancy Dunlap 
4.Southeastem: John Norton 
S.Westem: Sharon Rhodes-Wickett 

Committee on Correlation and Editonal Revision 

l.Cleha Hendnx SE 

2.Naomi Bartle NC 

•i Earl Riddle"^ 

4.Richard Evans NE 

Alternates: 

IRichard Plain "^ 

2.Hobart Hildyard SC 

Committee on Courtesies and Privileg es 

l.North Central: Deborah Kiesey 

2.Northeastem. Zedna Haverstock 

3. South Central: Kirbyjohn Caldwell 

4.Southeastem: Rachel James 

S.Westem: William Cook 

6. Central Conferences: Veronica C. Teano 

Committee on Credentials 

l.North Central: Joe Winston 

2.Northeastera: Alfred Johnson 

3.South Central: Tal Oden 

4.Southeastera: Charlene Kammerer 

S.Westem: Patricia Earns 

6. Central Conferences: Edward Puslecki 

Committee on Toumal 
LAnita Archer SE 
I.Charles Crutchfield SC 
3. William S. ReasnerNE 

Committee on Presiding Officers 
l.North Central clergy: Duane Sarazin 
2.North Central lay: Don Mendenhall 
3.Northeastem clergy: Richard Wright 
4.Northeastem lay: Sandra J. Ferguson 
S.South Central clergy: RexBevins 
6.South Central lay: Darlene Montgomery 
y.Southeastem clergy: Herschel Sheets 
S.Southeastera lay: Martha Twick Morrison 
9.Westem clergy: Mark Trotter 
lO.Westera lay: Peggy Sewell 
11. Central Conferences clergy: Artnin Besserer 
12.Central Conferences lay: J. Lemer Cox (Liberia); 
Leon Palaganas, alt. 

Committee on Reference Legislative Committee 

LNorth Central clergy: Earl Renshaw 1 

2.North Central lay: Cecile AdamslO 

3. Northeastern clergy: Dolores H. Henderson 8 

4.Northeastem lay: Genie S. Bank 3 

S.South Central clergy: Jon Jones S 

6.South Central lay: William Auvenschine 3 

y.Southeastem clergy: Ray Chamberlain 3 

S.Southeastem lay: Betty Alexander 7 

9.Westem clergy: Linda Wiberg 3 

lO.Westem lay: Jennie Yeoh 6 

11. Central Conferences clergy: Helmut Nausner 10 

12.Central Conferences lay: Umembudi Akasa 7 



Daily Edition Vol.3 No. 2 



25 



13.At-large: Paul Extrum-Fernandez (W) 2 

14.At-large: Lewis Parks (NE) 9 

15.At-large: Shan Yohan (SE) 6 

16.At-large Eugene Frazer (NC) 4 

(Each legislative committee, 1-10, is represented) 

COMMITTEE ON PLAN OF ORGANIZATION AND 
Rin.ES OF ORDER 

l.North Central' Emery Percell 

2.Northeastem. Jerome del Ptno 

3. South Central: Bette Trumble 

4.Southeastem: Darlene Amon 

S.Westem: Robert Stevens 

e.Central Conferences: Momo Kpaan (Liberia), Du- 
junda Lunge, alt. 

7 David TinocoV/ 

S Michael Coyner NC 

S.Charles BrockwellSE 

lOMarcus Matthews NE 
COMMISSION ON THE GENERAL CONFERENCE 

LNorth Central clergy: Kenneth Chalker 

2.North Central lay: Aileen Williams 

3. Northeastern clergy: James Perry 

[4.Northeastem lay: Robert Brandt] 

[S.South Central clergy: Carole Cotton-Winn] 

e.South Central lay: Nancy Foster 

y.Southeastem clergy: Charles White, Jr. 

[S.Southeastem lay: Mollie Stewart] 

9.Westem clergy: Anita Iceman 

[10. Western lay: Kimball Salmon] 

[11. Central Conferences: Maximo Dizon] 

[12. At-large: Harry Shaner (W)] 

13.At-large: Roberto GomezSC 

14.At-large: Phylemon Titus'NC 

SECRETARY-DESIGNATE OF THE GENERAL 

C ONFERENC E 

Carolyn Marshall 



C OMM ISSIO N QN CENTRAL CONFERENCE AF- 
EAffiS 

To be nominated by the Council of Bishops from elected 
delegates. 

I.Africa 

I Bishop NdorKimpa 

2Lodi Pungumbu 

S.Regina Marques 

2.Central and Southern Europe 
IBishop Bolleter 
IPatruk Streiff 
S.Eva Csemak 

S.Germany 

I Bishop Klaiber 

Z.Christel Grunecke (Armm Besserer, alt). 

S.Hans Adc 

4J^orth Central 



IBishop Rader 
ZRuss McReynolds 
3.Dixie Arter 

5.Northeastem 
IBishop May 
lEmest Lyght 
3. Christine Keels 

6.Northem Europe 
\ Bishop Vdxby 
Z.Christian Alsted 
3. Anders Isnes 

y.Philippines 
IBishop Nacpil 
ZHoberto Ladia 
S.Olive Beltran 

S.South Central 
l.Bishop Heam 
2Minerva Carcano 
S.Cheryl PhiUips 

9.Southeastem 
l.Bishop Morgan 
Z.Charles Lippse 
3. Barbara Garcia 

lO.West Africa 

IBishop Humper 

ZNathan Junius 

S.Anthony Danburam; Eke Halloway, ah. 

ll.Westem 
IBishop Talbert 

2 Jim Standiford 

3 Judy Davis 

12. World Division, General Board of Global Ministries 
l.Bishop Solomon SC 
2.Marion Edwards SE 
S.Betty Suzuki W 

EPISCOPAL MEMBERS OF GENERAL AGENCIES 



General Council on Ministries (1I1007.1ar2]) 
LNorth Central: Bill Lewis 
2.Northeastem: newly elected bishop 
S.South Central: J. Woodrow Heam 
4. Southeastern: newly elected bishop 
S.Westem: newly elected bishop 
6.Central Conferences: Fama Onema 

G eneral B o a r d o f P gn ?ions (^1 6Q2.1a ) 

1. Bnice Blake 

2.Newly elected bishop, Southeast 

General Board of Publication (111702) 
I.Judith Craig 
2.George W. Bashore 



26 



April 17, 1996 



General Commission on Archives and History 
(111894.2) 
LNewly elected bishop Southeast 
2.Emilio J.M. de Carvalho 



General Commission on Christian Unity and Interre- 
ligious Concerns (11200 6.1 ) 
I.Roy I. Sano 
2.Hans Vaxby 
3. Fritz Mutti 
4.Ecumenical Officer of the Council of Bishops 



General Commission on Communication (111907.1) 
I.Joe Wilson 
2. Sharon Z. Rader 
S.Newly elected bishop, Northeast 
Committee to nominate additional members 
(111907.11): Sharon Rader 

General Commission on Religion and Race (112103) 
l.S. Clifton Ives 
2. E lias Galvan 

General Commission on the Status and Role of Women 
(112204.4) 
LNewly elected bishop, South Central 
2.Newly elected bishop. North Central 



National Youth Ministry Organization Steering Com- 
mittee (111307.1) 
I.Fritz Mutti 



5.Felton E. May 

6.Jack Meadors 

7.Newly elected bishop, North Central 

8.ArthurF.Kulah 

9.Newly elected bishop, North Shaba (Zaire) 

lO.Ruediger Minor 

111412.6 

l.Heinrich Bolleter 

2.Moises Femandes 

3. Benjamin Gutierrez 

General Board of Higher Educa tion and Mmistn/ 
(1I805.2b) 
I.Robert Fannin 
2.Ray Owen 
3. Neil Irons 
4.William Dew 
S.William Morris 
6.William Oden 
7.Woodie White 
8.Joseph Humper 
9.Christopher Jokomo 
lO.Joao Somane Machado 

General Council on Finance and Administration 
(1190.S.1) 

I.Richard Looney 

2.Donald Ott 

3. Alfred Norris 

Committee on Official Forms and Records (11905.4c): 
Donald Ott 



General Board of Church and Society (11805.2b) 
I.Joel Martinez 
2.Melvin G. Talbert 
S.Charles W. Jordan 
4.Newly elected bishop. Northeast 
5.Newly elected bishop. Southeast 
6.Newly elected bishop, Northeast 
7.J. Alfred Ndoricimpa 
S.Emerito Nacpil 
9.Kainda Katembo 



National Council of Churches (112402.2b) 

I.Kenneth Carder 

2.William Oden 

3. Sharon Brown Christopher 

4.Felton May 

S.Ecumenical Officer of the COB 



BISHOPS TO CONVENE ORGANIZATION OF 
GENERAL CONFERENCE COMMITTEES 



General Board of Discipleship (118005.2b) 

I.Ann Sherer 

2.Sharon Brown Christopher 

3. Mary Ann Swenson 

4.Newly elected bishop, Southest 

S.Hae-Jong Kim 

6.Kenneth Carder 

7.WalterKlaiber 

8.Newly elected bishop. North Central 

9.Daniel Arichea 

lO.Newly elected bishop. Southeast 

111204.1 

Done Peter Dabale 

General Board of Global Ministries (11R05.2b) 
I.Susan Morrison 
2.Robert Morgan 
3.Dan Solomon 
4.Elias Galvan 



Courtesies and Privileges (Tues. Apr. 16, 1996, 9:30 
a.m.): Bishop Morris SE 

Presiding Officers (Tues. Apr. 16, 1996, 9:30 a.m.): 
Bishop Hae-Jong Kim NE 

Credentials (Tues. Apr. 16, 1996, 9:45 a.m.): Bishop 
Jordan NC 

Journal (Tues. Apr. 16, 1996, 9:45 a.m.): Bishop Kulah 
CC 

LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEES: ALL ON TUESDAY, 
APRIL 16, 1996, 4:30 P.M. 

l.Church and Society: Bishop Morrison, NE 

2.Conferences: Bishop Martinez , SC 

3.Discipleship: Bishop Ott , NC 

4.Financial Administration: Bishop Swenson, W 

S.General Admimstration/Judicial Administration: 
Bishop Bolleter, CC 

6.Global Ministries: Bishop Ives, NE 



Daily Edition Vol.3 No. 2 



27 



y.Higher Education and Chaplaincy: Bishop Meadors, 



SE 



S.Independenl Commissions: Bishop McConnell, W 

9.Local Church: Bishop Carder, SE 

lO.Ordained and Diaconal Ministry: Bishop Duecker. 



SC 



OTHER COMMITTEES: 

Committee on Plan of Organization and Rules of Order: 
Bishop Noms, SC 

Commission on the General Conference: Bishop de 
Carvalho, CC 

Commission on Central Conference Affairs (Tues 
April 16, 10:30 a.m.): Bishop Lawson, NC 
BISHOPS TO CONVENE ADDITIONAL MEM- 
BERS NOMINATING COMMITTEES 

July 25-26, General Board of Discipleship, Nashville, 
Bishop Carder 

July 29-30,General Board of Church & Society, Wash- 
ington, DC, Bishop Yeakel 

August l-2,General Council on Ministries, TBA, Biship 
Colaw 

August l-2,General Commission on Christian Unity, 
TBA, Bishop Grove 

August 2-3,General Board of Higher Education & Min., 
Nashville, Bishop Lee 

August 2-3,General Commission on the Status & Role 

of Women, TBA, Bishop Duecker 

August 6-8,General Board of Global Ministries, TBA, 
Bishop Ault 

August 9-10,General Commission on Religion and 
Race, TBA, Bishop Stockton 



August 23,Gencral Commission on Communication, 
Nashville, Bishop Morgan 

BISHOPS TO CONVENE GENERAL AGENCY 
ORGANIZATIONAL MEETINGS 

April 27, General Council on Finance and Admin. 

Denver , Bishop Swenson 

Aug. 27-29, General Board of Pension and Health Bene- 
fits TBA , Bishop Rader 

Sept. 8, Womens Division, GBGMNashville, Bishop 
Clark 

Sept. 18-22, General Board of Discipleship, Nashville, 
Bishop Dew 

Sept. 19-22,General Commission on Archives and His- 
tory Madison, NJ,Bishop Bashore 

Sept. 25-28, General Commission on Rel. and Race, 
Washington, DC.Bishop May 

Sept. 26-29, General Commission on Status and Role 

of Women,TBA, Bishop Mutti 

Oct. 3-6,General Board of Church and Society, 
TBA,Bishop Morgan 

Oct. 9-12, General Board of Higher Education.Nash- 
ville,Bishop Carder 

Oct. 9-14,GeneraI Comm. on Christian Unity ,TBA, 
Bishop Morrison 

Oct. 9-18,General Board of Global Ministnes, TBA, 
Bishop Craig 

Oct. 17-19, General Commission on Communication, 
Nashville ,Bishop Owen 

Oct. 23-29, General Council on Ministries ,TBA,Bishop 
Ott 



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April17. 1996 



Plan of Organization 



I. Opening Session and Organization 

The General Conference shall assemble on the day 
fixed at the place designated in accordance with the action 
taken by the preceding General Conference or the Com- 
mission on the General Conference. The Holy Commun- 
ion and Memorial Service shall be celebrated by the 
Conference, the Council of Bishops being in charge. Dur- 
ing the Memorial Service, there shall be called the names 
of the bishops who have died since the adjournment of the 
preceding General Conference, and hkewise the names 
of the delegates-elect who have died. The opening busi- 
ness session of the Conference shall be on the day and at 
the hour fixed by the Commission on the General Confer- 
ence and shall be called to order by the bishop designated, 
as provided in the Discipline 15.11. 

The following order of business shall be observed: 

A. Roll Call. The record of attendance shall be made in 
writing to the Secretary of the General Conference by: 

(1) The Secretary of the Council of Bishops for the 
bishops, 

(2) The Secretary of the Judicial Council for that body, 

(3) The General Secretary of the General Council on 
Ministries for all general secretaries, 

(4) The chairperson of each delegation for its member- 
ship. The chairperson shall be provided with a form on 
which to report daily the attendance of its members. Any 
reserve seated in the place of a regular delegate shall have 
been duly elected as a reserve delegate by the Annual 
Conference and shall meet the requirements set forth in 
the Discipline 37-39. Delegates, including reserves when 
the latter are substituted for a delegate or delegates, shall 
be seated in the order of their election, except when a 
reserve is seated temporarily, in which case the reserve 
shall occupy the seat of the delegate for whom the substi- 
tution is made. All delegates arriving after the opening 
roll call shall be reported by the chairperson of the dele- 
gation to the Committee on Credentials. (See Section 
VIII.A.4. and Rule 5. See also Discipline 607 definmg a 
Quorum.) and 

(5) The chairperson of the delegation for affiliated 
Autonomous Methodist and United Churches delega- 
tions. 

B. Establish the bar of the conference. 

C. Report of The Commission on The General Confer- 
ence. 

D. Report of The Plan of Organization and Rules of 
Order. 

E. Elections 

(1) Coordinator of Calendar. (See FV-C) 

(2) Committee on The Plan of Organization and Rules 
of Order. 

F. Report Of Committee On Agenda. 

G. Miscellaneous Business. 
H. Adjournment. 

II. Episcopal and Laity Addresses 

The Quadrennial Address of the Council of Bishops 
shall be delivered early in the Conference, at such hour 



as determined by the Commission on the General Con- 
ference 

The Quadrennial Address of the Laity shall be delivered 
early in the Conference, at such hour as determined by 
the Commission on the General Conference. The Na- 
tional Association of Annual Conference Lay Leaders 
shall be responsible for the preparation and presentation 
of the Quadrennial Lay Address, taking care to consult 
with lay leadership of the Central Conferences. The Na- 
tional Association of Annual Conference Lay Leaders 
shall enlist participation of men, women, youth, young 
adults, racial and ethmc minonties, and persons with 
handicapping conditions in the preparation and presenta- 
tion of the address. 

in. Presiding Officers 

The presiding officers for the several sessions of the 
Conference, the opening session excepted (See Section 
I, above), shall be chosen from among the effective bish- 
ops by the Committee on Presiding Officers. (See Section 
Vni.A.6.) 

IV. Secretarial Staff 

A. The Secretary of the General Conference shall be 
responsible for all functions of the office in preparation for 
the session of the General Conference. The secretary 
shall select persons fi-om the clergy and lay membership 
of The United Methodist Church to serve on the secre- 
tarial support staff. 

C. The Conference shall elect, upon nomination by the 
Secretary, a Coordinator of Calendar, who shall assist the 
Committee on Agenda and Calendar in presenting reports 
in such order as to expedite the business of the Confer- 
ence, as well as in other responsibilities of the committee. 
(See I.E.I and Vm.A.l). 

D. After ascertaining that petitions, resolutions, and 
similar communications in hand and dealing with the 
regular business of the Conference meet the requirement 
of 608 of The Book of Discipline, the Secretary shall be 
responsible for preparing the same for reference to the 
appropriate legislative committee, subject to review by 
the Committee on Reference. (See Section Vni.A.7.) In 
the case of a single petition signed by a number of people, 
the Committee need print only the name of the first signer 
with an indication of the total number of signers. 

E. The work of the Secretary shall be supervised by the 
Executive Committee of the (Commission on the General 
Conference. A budget for the work of the Secretary shall 
be presented by the Commission on the General Confer- 
ence to the General Council on Finance and Administra- 
tion. Such budget shall be paid out of the General 
Administration Fund. 

F. If in the interim of the quadrennial sessions of the 
Genera] Conference the office of Secretary shall for any 
reason be vacated, the Council of Bishops shall elect a 
successor to serve until the next session. 

V. Nominations and Elections. 

The Secretary of the General Conference shall develop 
a timehne for the submission of nominations and elec- 



Daily Edition Vol.S No. 2 



29 



tions/appointments by the Council of Bishops. In making 
these nominations and elections/appointments, attention 
shall be given to ensuring contmuity of membership from 
the previous quadrennium. 

It shall be the responsibility of the Council of Bishops 
to present nominations for The Commission on the Gen- 
eral Conference, Committee on Plan of Organization and 
Rules of Order, Commission on Central Conference Af- 
fairs, General Conference standing committees, and sec- 
retary- designate of The General Conference. These 
nominations shall be presented to the Genera) Confer- 
ence for election. 

Disciplinary provisions shall govern the nomination and 
election procedures for. 

General Council on Finance and Administration (H 905) 

General Board of Pension and Health Benefits (H 
1602.1a) 

General Commission on Archives and History (H 
1804.2) 

The University Senate (H 1517.2) 

The Judicial Council (UH 2602, 2603) 

Episcopal membership on; 

General Board of Church and Society (U 805.2b) 

General Board of Discipleship (H 805.2b) 

General Board of Global Ministries (H 805.2b, H 1412.6) 

General Board of Higher Education and Ministry (H 
805.2b) 

VI. Commission on The General Conference. 

A. There shall be a Commission on the General Con- 
ference composed of one clergy and one layperson from 
each Junsdiction and four members-at-large, at least one 
of whom shall be from an Annual Conference outside the 
United States, who shall be nominated by the Council of 
Bishops at its Fall meeting next preceding the General 
Conference and elected by the General Conference for a 
term of eight years, half of whom shall be elected by the 
General Conference each quadrennium. If vacancies oc- 
cur, the Council of Bishops shall elect successors to serve 
until the next session of the General Conference and then 
nominate for election by the General Conference persons 
to serve any remainder of the term. The Secretary of the 
General Conference, the Treasurer of the General Coun- 
cil on Finance and Administration, and the Business Man- 
ager of the General Conference shall also be members 
ex-officio but without vote. The Commission may elect 
two additional members-at-large for each quadrennium. 

The Council of Bishops shall designate one of its mem- 
bers to convene and organize the Commission before the 
adjournment of the General Conference. 

B. This Commission shall determine the place and time 
(within such limits as may be set up by the General 
Conference) of the next General Conference and shall 
send an official notice to all elected delegates announcing 
specifically the opening day and hour of the General 
Conference and anticipated time of adjournment. It shall 
further advise the General Conference delegates in ad- 
vance of all such special events and orders of the day, the 
dates and times of which have been determmed prior to 
the opening of the General Conference, in order that the 
delegates may have an overview of the General Confer- 
ence program. The Commission shall make all necessary 
arrangements in connection therewith, including arrange- 



ments for the publication of the Daily Christian Advocate 
and quadrennial reports of the general agencies of the 
church, the same to be published by the United Methodist 
Pubhshing House. The Daily Christian Advocate shall 
pnnt the list of nominees for election to the Judicial 
Council, with biographical sketches not to exceed 100 
words in length for each nominee. 

C The Commission shall take the necessary measure 
to assure full participation of all General Conference Dele- 
gates, including providing accommodation for language 
and physical challenges. 

D The Commission shall plan the schedule for the 
opening day of the Conference. 

E. The Commission shall recommend to the General 
Conference the per diem allowance to be paid to the 
elected delegates. (See Section X.) 

F. The Secretary, on behalf of the Commission on the 
General Conference, shall issue invitations to ecumenical 
representatives after consultation with the Council of 
Bishops and The General Commission on Chnstian Unity 
and Interreligious Concerns. The Commission shall ar- 
range for local hospitality and presentation of ecumenical 
representatives to the General Conference. 

G. The Commission is authonzed, if it deems it advis- 
able, to select the site of the General Conference two 
quadrennia in advance. 

Vn. Plan of Organization and Rules of Order. 

A. There shall be a Committee on Plan of Organization 
and Rules of Order of ten members, including member- 
ship from each of the Jurisdictions and from Annual Con- 
ferences outside the United States, nominated from the 
elected delegates to the General Conference by the Coun- 
cil of Bishops at its Fall meeting preceding the General 
Conference and elected by the General Conference for a 
term of four years. Members maybe elected for additional 
terms of four years, provided no more than four members 
of the new committee are returning members. The Sec- 
retary and Business Manager of the Conference shall be 
ex-officio members without vote. The Council of Bishops 
shall designate one of its members to convene and organ- 
ize this committee after it is elected. 

Outgoing members of the committee present at Gen- 
eral Conference may meet with the newly elected com- 
mittee during the current sessions of General 
Conference. These outgoing members will have voice but 
no vote. 

B. To this committee shall be referred any proposed 
amendments to the Plan of Organization and Rules of 
Order (See Rule 39). To it may be referred any other 
matters relating to parliamentary order or procedure in 
the business of the General Conference. 

C. This committee shall serve as an Interim Committee 
between sessions of the General Conference. The com- 
mittee shall restudy the Plan of Organization and Rules of 
Order and make needed changes and adaptations and, 
after printing in the Advance DCA, shall present them to 
the General Conference for consideration and final action, 
same to be published in the Daily Christian Advocate 
which serves as the Journal of the General Conference. 

D. The Plan of Organization and Rules of Order of the 
General Conference shall be the Plan of Organization and 
Rules of Order as published in the Journal of the preceding 



30 



April 17, 1996 



General Conference until they have been altered or modi- 
fied by action of the General Conference (Disciphne, 606.) 

Vni. Committees 

The General Conference shall have the standing com- 
mittees heremafter indicated, with such functions, re- 
sponsibilities, and limitations respectively as are 
hereinafter prescnbed, and such special committees as it 
may order. 

A. Standing Administrative Committees 

The members of the following committees shall be 
appointed by the Council of Bishops at its Fall meeting 
preceding the General Conference. All except the Com- 
mittee on Correlation and Editonal Revision shall be from 
the elected delegates to the General Conference. (See 
Section V.) Members of standing administrative commit- 
tees which meet prior to the day on which the General 
Conference convenes, shall receive the delegate per diem 
for each additional day on which their attendance is re- 
quired. Delegates who are nominated for such commit- 
tees less than 60 days prior to the opening session of 
General Conference shall be entitled to reimbursement 
for any additional transportation costs. 

(1) Agenda and Calendar 

(a) There shall be a Committee on Agenda and Calendar 
of eight members, at least four of whom shall be layper- 
sons, to be constituted as follows: one from each Junsdic- 
tion, one from Annual Conferences outside the United 
States, the Coordinator of the Calendar, and the chairper- 
son or substitute for the Chairperson of the Program 
Committee of the Commission on the General Confer- 
ence. No member of the committee shall be chairperson 
of a Standing Legislative Committee or staff person of any 
general agency. The Committee shall be convened, for 
the purpose of organization, by the Secretary of the Gen- 
eral Conference at least the day before the opening of the 
General Conference. 

Following the presentation and adoption of the report 
of the Commission on the General Conference at the 
opening session of the General Conference, the Commit- 
tee on Agenda and Calendar shall immediately become 
responsible for guiding the order of business of the Con- 
ference. 

(b) The Committee on Agenda and Calendar shall: 

(1) Present calendar reports in such an order as to 
expedite the business of the Conference, 

(2) Inform the bishop presiding as soon as possible of 
the agenda items, including order of priority, to be con- 
sidered, 

(3) Keep an overview of calendar progress; 

(4) Report to each session of the General Conference 
recommendations concerning business agenda, includmg 
time allocation and order in which legislative committee 
reports shall be printed; 

(5) Give priority to calendar items as soon as they are 
available; 

(6) Give priority to calendar items involving minority 
reports; 

(7) Announce, at the last plenary session of each day, a 
tentative agenda for the next day; 

(8) Consult daily with the legislative committee chair- 
persons to expedite the business of the General Confer- 
ence; and 



(9) Receive all requests for special orders of the day 
except those requested in the report of the Commission 
on the General Conference on the first day of the Confer 
ence. 

(c)Proposals, questions, communications, resolutions 
and other matters not included in the regular business of 
the General Conference shall be referred to the Commit 
tec on Agenda and Calendar without motion or debate 
This committee shall determine whether or not the mat 
ter presented shall be considered by the General Confer 
ence. Appeal from the decision of this committee may be 
presented to the Conference upon the written signature 
ot twenty delegates, and the item shall be presented to 
the Conference if the appeal is supported by a one-third 
vote 

(2) Correlation and Editorial Revision. 

There shall be a Committee on Correlation and Edito- 
rial revision of four persons not members of the General 
Conference and the Book Editor, who shall be an ex-offi- 
cio member. They shall be entitled to reimbursement of 
expenses for attendance at meetings of the committee. 
Two alternates shall be appointed by the Council of Bish- 
ops. The Book Editor shall convene the committee forthe 
purpose of organization. The function of this committee 
shall be: 

(a) To review all proposed legislation reported in the 
Daily Christian Advocate and that presented in special 
reports to the General Conference. The Committee shall 
report to the standing committees concerned, or to the 
General Conference as the situation may warrant, all 
contradictions, duplications, and inconsistencies discov- 
ered. 

(b) To assure that, when a calendar item approved on 
the Consent Calendar or under an omnibus vote is found 
to be in conflict with parts of another calendar item 
discussed and voted upon at a plenary session, the item 
discussed and voted shall prevail. 

(c) To edit the Discipline in accordance with Section 
XI.B. 

(3) Courtesies and Privileges. 

There shall be a Committee on Courtesies and Privi- 
leges of six members composed of one representative 
from each Jurisdiction and one representative from An- 
nual Conferences outside the United States. The commit- 
tee shall be convened by a Bishop for the purpose of 
organization. 

The committee has the following duties and responsi- 
bihties: 

(a) To consider, as presented to it by members of the 
Conference, what said members regard as questions or 
matters of privilege, to decide whether they are such or 
not, and if they are regarded as being such, to recommend 
to the Conference that they be heard. 

(b) To consider resolutions of commendation, courtesy, 
appreciation, etc., submitted in writing by delegates. The 
committee may initiate similar resolutions and edit and 
amend those submitted to it. Resolutions approved by the 
committee shall be printed in the Daily Chnstian Advo- 
cate and brought to the floor if the committee considers 
them of unusual importance or urgency. 



Daily Edition Vol.3 No. 2 



31 



(c) To arrange for extending courtesies of the Confer- 
ence to any to whom they may be due, ecumenical repre- 
sentatives and official visitors excepted. 

(d) To limit its report, including the statement of the 
chairperson and the hearing of such persons as may be 
presented, to a maximum of ten minutes m any one 
business day. No person or persons shall be presented 
whose request has been denied by the Commission on the 
General Conference, nor after the sixth day unless ap- 
proved by a two-thirds vote of the Conference. (See Rule 
26.3.) 

(4) Credentials. 

There shall be a Committee on Credentials of six mem- 
bers, composed of one delegate from each Jurisdiction and 
one delegate from Annual Conferences outside the United 
States. The committee shall be convened by a Bishop for 
the purpose of organization. 

To this Committee, the chairpersons of the respective 
annual conference delegations shall report on a form 
provided for that puipose any change in seating of dele- 
gates, indicating the length of time for which the change 
shall be effective. (See Section I.A.4.) The chairperson of 
this committee shall make a daily written report to the 
Secretary of the General Conference, listmg aU changes 
of seating approved by the Committee. In the event of 
questions which may arise regarding the eligibility of 
seating any delegates, this Committee shall report di- 
rectly to the General Conference with its recommenda- 
tions. (See Rule 5.) 

(5) Journal. 

There shall be a Committee on the Journal of three 
members to approve daily the record of Proceedings of 
the General Conference prepared by the Secretary and 
assistant(s). The committee shall be convened by a 
Bishop for the purpose of organization. 

(6) Presiding Officers. 

There shall be a committee on Presiding Officers of 
twelve members, composed of one clergy and one layper- 
son from each Jurisdiction and one clergy and one layper- 
son from among the delegates representing the Annual 
Conferences outside the United States. The committee 
shall be convened by a Bishop for the purpose of organi- 
zation. 

The Committee shall select and notify the presiding 
officer(s) of each session at least 24 hours in advance, 
insofar as possible. The Committee shall be free to select 
a bishop for more than one session and to change the 
presiding officer during the session, whenever it seems 
advisable. (See Section III.) 

(7) Reference. 

There shall be a Committee on Reference of sixteen 
members, composed of one clergy and one lay delegate 
from each Jurisdiction, one clergy and one lay delegate 
from Annual Conferences outside the United States, and 
four mcmbers-at-large. The membership of this commit- 
tee shall include at least one member from each legislative 
committee. This committee shall be convened, for the 
purpose of organization, by the Secretary of the Genera) 
Conference the day prior to the opening of the General 
Conference. 

(a) After reviewing the proposed assignments by the 
Secretary to standing committees of the petitions, reso- 



lutions, and similar communications deabng with the 
regular business of the Conference, this committee shall 
refer the same to the appropriate legislative committees. 
(See Section IV.D.) One member of each legislative 
committee serving on this committee shall be designated 
to coordinate petitions assigned to his/her respective 
legislative committee. This committee shall also be re- 
sponsible for reviewing the assignment, by the Secretary, 
of all reports, recommendations, and resolutions from 
general agencies, standing or special commissions and 
committees, and all other communications which shall 
come into the Secretary's hands after the convening of 
the General Conference, all of which shall be referred 
directly to appropriate legislative committees without 
presentation to a plenary session of the General Confer- 
ence. 

(b) The Committee on Reference may withdraw a paper 
that has been assigned to a committee, either upon a 
request or upon its own motion. It may also withhold from 
reference or publication any document it shall deem im- 
proper. 

(c) Where the Committee finds two or more substan- 
tially identical petitions, it may group them under one title 
and number, indicating the total number of petitions 

(d) No petitions shall be assigned by the Committee on 
Reference to any General Conference Committee unless 
they meet the requirements of the Book of Discipline 

B. Commission on Central Conference Affairs. 
(For membership, see Disciphne, 2301.) 

To this Commission shall be referred all petitions, 
resolutions, etc., relating to the Central Conferences, 
Autonomous Churches, Affihated Churches, Affihated 
United Churches and Concordant relationships (Disci- 
plme, 26-34, 528, 636-654, 2301.) 

The Commission on Central Conference Affairs shall 
submit its report and any legislative proposals related to 
the paragraphs assigned to it directly to the General 
Conference. 

If the Commission on Central Conference Affairs has a 
concern for any paragraphs assigned to one of the legisla- 
tive committees, the commission shall offer its recom- 
mendation to the appropriate legislative committee for 
consideration and recommendation to the General Con- 
ference. 

C. Standing Legislative Committees. 

The General Conference shall have the following stand- 
ing legislative committees, which shall consider all pro- 
posals looking toward new legislation or changes in the 
present legislation of the church, including all reports and 
recommendations from general agencies, and standing or 
special commissions or committees, and report recom- 
mendations relating thereto the Conference. 

Any legislative committee considenng legislation at- 
tectingthe concerns of the Commission on Central Con- 
ference Affairs shall consult with the Commission before 
submitting its proposed legislation to the General Confer- 
ence. 

(1) Church and Society. 

To this committee shall be referred all petitions, reso- 
lutions, etc., relating to the statement of Social Principles, 
social issues, and the work and concerns of the Board of 
Church and Society. 



32 



April 17, 1996 



Discipline paragraphs 

70-76Social Principles 

728AC: Board of Church and Society 

753Distnct Director 

1101-1115General Board of Church and Society 

(2) Conferences. 

To this committee shall be referred all petitions, reso- 
lutions, etc., relating to the composition and activities of 
the General, Jurisdictional, Annual, Provisional, Mission- 
ary, and District Conferences, and Missions, including tlie 
Jurisdictional, Annual and District Conference Councils 
on Mimstnes. 

Discipline paragraphs 

7-llConstitution: Conferences 

12-15Constitution: General Conference 

21-25Constitution: Jurisdictional Conferences 

35-39Constitution; Annual Conferences 

40-44Constitution: Boundaries 

45Constitution; District Conferences 

505-507Election, Assignment of Bishops 

601-611General Conference (including opening state- 
ment) 

612-627Junsdictional Conference 

628, 630Junsdictional Agencies 

629Junsdictional Council on Ministries 

655-658Provisional Annual Conferences 

659-662Missionary Conference 

663-664Mission 

701-707Annual Conference 

726AC: Council on Ministries 

747AC; Ministry to Persons with Handicapping Condi- 
tions 

749-750District Conference 

• 752District Council on Ministries 

• ReportGlobal Nature of the Church 

• (3) Discipleship. 

To this committee shall be referred all petitions, reso- 
lutions, etc., relating to the work and concerns of the 
Boards of Discipleship, and the report of the Study on 
Baptism. 

Discipline paragraphs 

65-69Doctnne 
278-281LC: Lay Speaking 
282LC: Lay Preacher 
632JYMO Convocation 
635JC: Committee of UMM 
729AC: Board of Discipleship 
730AC: Board of Laity 
743AC: CYM 

744AC: United Methodist Men 
745AC: CYM 
751Distnct Lay Leader 
757District Board of Laity 
758Distnct Committee on Lay Speaking 
761DC: United Methodist Men 
762Distnct CYM 

1201-1206General Board of Discipleship 
1207-1210GBOD: Education 

1211-1215 GBOD: Evangehsm, Worship and Steward- 
ship 



1216-1222GBOD: Ministry of the Laity 

1223GBOD: UMM 

1224-1229GOD: Curriculum Resources Committee 

1301-1311NYMO 

ReportStudy on Baptism 

(4) Financial Administration. 

To this committee shall be referred all petitions, reso- 
lutions, etc., relating to the work and concerns of the 
Council on Finance and Administration, the Board of 
Pension and Health Benefits, and the Board of Publica- 
tion. The budget and recommendations prepared by the 
General Council on Finance and Administration shall be 
submitted to this committee for study and review. There- 
after, when the General Council on Finance and Admini- 
stration presents its report to the General Conference for 
action, the committee shall present its recommendations 
and may propose amendments. 

Discipline paragraphs 

SConstitution: Title to Properties 

20Constitution: Restnctive Rule 

708-716AC: Council on Finance and Administration 

717-725AC: Clergy Support 

736Episcopal Residence 

737AC: Board of Pensions 

746AC: Joint Committee on Disability 

901-909General Council on Finance and Admmistration 

910-913GCFA: General Funds 

916GCFA: Special Days Offerings 

917-922GCFA: General Funds 

923-932GCFA: Episcopal Fund 

1601-1605General Board of Pension and Health Bene- 
fits 

1606-1609Annual Conference Pension Administration 

1701-1743General Board of Pubhcations 

2501-2524Church Property 

2554Trustees of Church Institutions 

(5) General Administrationyjudicial Administration. 

To this committee shall be referred all petitions, reso- 
lutions, etc., relating to the work and concerns of the 
General Council on Mimstnes, including the Advance, 
Judicial Administration, and the report of the Site Selec- 
tion Task Force. 

The report of the General Council on Ministries shall 
be submitted to this committee for study and review. 
Thereafter, when the General Council on Ministnes pre- 
sents its report to the General Conference for action, the 
committee shall present its recommendations and may 
propose amendments. 

Discipline paragraphs 

1-4 Constitution: General (including Preamble) 

16-17, 19Constitution: Restrictive Rules 

58-61The Judiciary 

62-64Constitution: Amendments 

274-277Local Church Special Sundays 

727AC: Advance Program 

748AC: Committee on Native American Ministry 
801-825Admmistrative Order: General Provisions 
9l4-915The Advance 
1001-1007General Council on Ministries 
2601-2621Judicial Council 
2622-2628Investigation, Trials and Appeals 



Daily Edition Vol.3 No. 2 



33 



ReportCoanectional Issues 
ReportSite Selection Task Force 

(6) Global Ministnes. 

To this committee shall be referred all petitions, reso- 
lutions, etc., relating to the work and concerns of the 
Boards of Global Ministries, and the report on Hispanic 
and Native Amencan Ministnes. 

Discipline paragraphs 

634JC: United Methodist Women 

731 AC: Board of Global Ministnes 

743 AC: United Methodist Women 

760DC: United Methodist Women 

1401-1412General Board of Global Ministries 

1413-1417GBGM: National Division 

1418-1421 GBGM: Office of Deaconess 

1422-1430GBGM: Women's Division 

1431-1439GBGM: World Division 

1440-1448GBGM: Health and Welfare Ministries 

1449-1453GBGM: Mission Education and Cultivation 

1454-1458GBGM: Mission Personnel Resources 

1459-1468GBGM: UM Committee on Relief 

ReportHispanic Ministires 

ReportNative Amencan Ministries 

(7) Higher Education and Chaplamcy. 

To this committee shall be referred all petitions, reso- 
lutions, etc., relating to the work and concerns of Higher 
Education, Schools of Theology, and the Division of Chap- 
laincy and Related Ministnes. 

Discipline paragraphs 

732AC: Board of Higher Education and Campus Minis- 
try 

1501-1509General Board of Higher Education and Min- 
istry 

1510-1512GBHEM: Division of Chaplains and Related 
Ministries 

1513-1523GBHEM: Division of Higher Education 

1530-1532GBHEM: Schools of Theology 

(8) Independent Commissions 

To this committee shall be referred all petitions, reso- 
lutions, etc., relating to commissions, and ecumenical 
concerns. This shall include Archives and History, Chris- 
tian Unity and Interreligious Concerns, Communications, 
Religion and Race, Status and Role of Women, and mem- 
bership or relationship to the World Methodist Council, 
Councils and Consultations of Churches, the American 
Bible Society, and the report on the Consultation on 
Church Union. 
Discipline paragraphs 
SConstitution: Ecumenical Relations 
631JC: Commission on Archives and History 
738AC: Commission on Archives and History 
739AC: Commission on Chnstian Unity and Interre- 
ligious Concerns 
740AC: Commission on Religion and Race 
741AC: Commission on Status and Role of Women 
742AC: Commission on Small Membership Church 
754DC: Director Ethnic Local Church Concerns 
755DC: Director Religion and Race 
18()l-1812Gcneral Commission on Archives and His- 
tory 
1901-1909General Commission on Communications 



2001-2006General Commission on Christian Unity and 
Interreligious Concerns 

2101-2108General Commission on Religion and Race 

2201-2209General Commission on Status and Role of 
Women 

2401-2406 Interdenominational Agencies 

ReportConsultation on Church Union 

(9) Local Church. 

To this committee shall be referred all petitions, reso- 
lutions, etc., relating to the organization of the local 
church and its membership, programs, boards, councils, 
commissions, committees, etc., or relating to local church 
property. 

Discipline paragraphs. 

46-47Constitution: Charge Conferences 

101-107Mission and Ministry of the Church 

111-114 

201-207Local Church 

208-243LC: Church Membership 

244-270LC: Organization and Administration 

271-273LC: General 

2525-2553LC: Property 

(10) Ordained and Diaconal Ministry. 

To this committee shall be referred all petitions, reso- 
lutions, etc., relatingto the work of the ordained ministry, 
diaconal ministry, supenntendency, and the report of the 
Study of Ministry. 

Discipline paragraphs 

18Constitution: Restrictive Rule 

48-57Constitution: Episcopal Supervision 

108-llORepresentative Ministry 

301-317Diaconal Ministry 

401-459Ordained Ministry 

501-504Superintendency 

508-5 16Superintendency: Bishops 

517-525Superintendency: District Supenntendents 

526-527,529Expressions of Superintendency 

530-534Appointment-Making 

633JC: Committee on Ordained and Diaconal Mimstries 

733 AC: Board of Ordained Ministry 

734AC: Board of Diaconal Ministry 

735AC: Committee on Episcopacy 

756DC: Committee on Ordained Ministry 

759DC: Committee on Episcopacy 

1524-1526GBHEM: Division of Diaconal Ministry 

1527-1529GBHEM: Division of Ordained Ministry 

ReportStudy of Ministry 

Report and recommendations of the Study of Ministry 
include amendments to HH 38, 101-1532. 

D. Membership of Standing Legislative Committees. 

(1) Each delegate shall serve as a member of one of the 
standing legislative committees numbered 1 to 10. Within 
the annual conference delegation each member shall 
choose from the legislative committees 1 to 10 the com- 
mittee on which to serve, the choice being made in order 
of election. Beginning with 1988, the clergy first elected, 
shall be entitled to the first choice, the lay delegate first 
elected, the second choice, and thus the nght of choice 
shall continue to alternate between clergy and lay dele- 
gates in the order of their election. For subsequent Gen- 
eral Conferences, first choice shall alternate between the 



34 



April 17, 1996 



lay and clergy delegates, provided that two members of a 
delegation may not serve on any one of the above-desig- 
nated standing legislative committees 1 to 10 unless the 
said delegation is represented on each of them. All dele- 
gations composed of eleven or more members shall ass ign 
all members in excess of ten according to this same 
principle of distribution. (For example, a conference with 
sixteen delegates shall have two members on each of any 
six of these ten committees and one on each of the 
remaining four. Similarly, a conference with 35 delegates 
shall have four members on each of five committees and 
three on each of the remaining five. Each delegate may, 
in the order herein indicated, select any one of these ten 
committees, provided that the foregoing division of the 
delegates among the committees is maintained.) When- 
ever a delegation has more than one member on a legis- 
lative committee, its members shall be divided as equally 
as possible between lay and clergy. Thus, if there are 
three members on a committee, they shall be two clergy 
and one lay or vice versa. 

(2) If a matter is under consideration in any standing 
legislative committee which m the judgment of any annual 
conference delegation vitally affects the interests of its 
constituency, and if the said annual conference is not 
represented in the membership of said committee, then 
the said delegation may choose one of its members to 
represent its annual conference in the committee when 
the matter judged to be vital to the interests of this 
constituency is under consideration. Such a person shall 
be entitled to sit with the committee while this particular 
matter is being considered and shall be entitled to the 
floor, subject to such limitations as are imposed on the 
regular members of said committee, but shall not be 
entitled to vote. (See Section VIII.E.4.) 

(3) Each person seated in the General Conference with 
the right to speak but not vote may submit to the Secre- 
tary of the General Conference a choice of a legislative 
committee and shall have the same right in that commit- 
tee to speak but not to vote. 

E. Meeting of Committees. 

(1) For Organization. All standing legislative and admin- 
istrative committees shall meet for organization at such 
time as the Commission on the General Conference shall 
determine. A bishop appomted by the Council of Bishops 
and an assistant secretary appointed by the Secretary of 
the General Conference shall serve, respectively, as 
chairperson and secretary to effect an organization in each 
of the several standing committees, except where other 
provision is specified. The first meeting of the legislative 
committees shall be held as soon as possible following the 
first plenary session of the General Conference. The 
orientation of the committee, followed by the election of 
officers, shall be the order of business of the first meeting 
of the committee. 

(a) The election of chairperson, vice-chairperson, and 
Secretary of each standing committee, both administra- 
tive and legislative, shall be by ballot. 

(b) The Secretary of the General Conference shall be 
responsible for arranging for a training session for all 
chairpersons, vice-chairpersons, and secretaries of legis- 
lative committees as soon as possible after their elections. 
The training shall include instruction in their duties, all 



procedures in the handhng of petitions, the times of the 
daily deadline for publishing reports, and other informa- 
tion to expedite the work of the committees. The Com- 
mission on the General Conference is requested to 
arrange for a time and place for such a training session. 

(2) Regular Meetings. The standing legislative commit- 
tees 1 to 10 inclusive shall meet for business as scheduled 
by the Agenda Committee unless otherwise ordered by 
the Conference, until their work is completed, and at such 
other times as the committees may themselves deter- 
mme. 

(3) Quorum for Committee Meetings. A majonty of the 
members shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of 
business in all committees. 

(4) Each legislative committee shall estabhsh an area in 
which only voting committee members will be seated. 
Staff, resource persons, and visitors may speak only when 
authorized, in each instance by specific committee action. 
(See Section VIII.D.2.) 

(5) Legislative committees are urged to give priority to 
significant and controversial legislation so that then" re- 
ports on such matters may be printed as soon as possible 
in the Daily Christian Advocate and considered by the 
General Conference. 

(6) Minority reports should be encouraged so that dif- 
fering views held by a significant portion of the committee 
may be carefully prepared and expressed and the issues 
clearly defined for decision by the General Conference. 
Adequate time should be given for the minority to prepare 
its report and every effort made to have the majority and 
minority reports printed together in the Daily Christian 
Advocate (See Rules 16, 32, 33 and 35). 

F. Function and Authority Of Committees 

(1) The standing administrative committees, without 
specific instruction or direction from the Conference, 
shall assume responsibihty for considering and reporting 
to the Conference upon all matters which would logically 
fall within their respective purviews, if it seems wise to 
do so. 

(2) The standing legislative committees may not origi- 
nate business, but shall consider and report only upon that 
which is referred to them by the Committee on Refer- 
ence, or which has been referred to them directly by the 
Conference and processed by the Committee on Refer- 
ence. (See Rule 30.) 

K. Proposal Involving Expenditure of Unbudgeted 
Funds 

A. Any proposal submitted to the General Conference 
to establish an interim or continuing board, commission, 
committee or task force shall be referred to the General 
Council on Finance and Administration or its executive 
committee for a report and recommendation before final 
action is taken. 

The General Council on Finance and Administration or 
its executive committee shall provide the General Con- 
ference with the following before action is taken: 

(1) an estimated budget for the proposed board, com- 
mission, committee or task force for the next quadren- 
nium; and 

(2) a statement explaining how the creation of the 
proposed board, commission, committee, or task force 
will affect the budget or budgets for existing boards, 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No. 2 



35 



commissions, committees and task forces already pre- 
sented by the General Council on Finance and Admini- 
stration. 

B. Any proposal submitted to the General Conference 
which involves the expenditure of funds not included in 
the established budget shall be referred to the General 
Council on Finance and Administration for advice and 
recommendation before final action is taken. 

X. Delegates' Expense Accounts 

A. The report of the chairperson of the respective 
annual conference delegations shall be the basis for set- 
tlement with principal and reserve delegates for their per 
diem allowances. The total traveUng expense including 
per diem shall be payable to the principal delegate if 
present and seated. If during the Conference a reserve 
delegate is seated for a pnncipal delegate for one or more 
hill days, the pnncipal delegate shall adjust the per diem 
with such reserve on the basis of the time served by each. 

B. Full travel expenses and per diem shall be paid for 
the number of allotted delgates from each conference 
whether those delegates are pnncipal or reserve. 

C. Air travel expense shall be on the basis of the most 
economical roundtnp tourist/coach air fare directly to and 
from the seat of the General Conference. Special excur- 
sion and promotional fares shall be utilized whenever 
possible. Additional expenses may be allowed delegates 
from Conferences outside the United States for amval 
and departure not to exceed two days before or after 
General Conference. The per diem expense allowance for 
all such days before and after General Conference shall 
be at the same rate as granted delegates during General 
Conference. Exceptions to these limitations must be ap- 
proved by the Business Manager of the General Confer- 
ence. 

D. When one or more delegates come in the same 
automobile, the owner will be allowed the established rate 
per mile plus the cost of room and meals en route up to 
the established General Conference per diem rate. Guest 
passengers who are the principal delegates to the General 
Conference shall submit only the cost of room and meals 
en route up to the estabUshed General Conference per 
diem rate. Maximum use of automobiles for travel may 
not exceed 1,000 miles roundtrip, for reimbursement 
purposes. If automobile travel exceeds 1000 miles 
roundtrip, reimbursement will be based upon the most 
economical roundtrip tounst^coach airfare, or the mileage 
reimbursement, whichever is less. In all cases delegates 
shall report only the actual cost of travel. 

E. For the dates General Conference is in session, no 
General Conference delegate shall receive expense 
money from the general church or any of its boards and 
agencies other than approved per diem and travel ex- 
penses available to all delegates. This provision is not to 
restnct financial assistance to delegates from their own 
annual conferences. This shall become effective with the 
General Conference of 2000. 

XI. Material to be Included in The Discipline 

A. No non-legislative matenal shall be ordered pnnted 
in the Discipline without first referring it to the com mittee 
on Correlation and Editonal Revision for consideration 
and report to the General Conference for further consid- 
eration and final action. 



B The Book Editor, the Secretary of the General 
Conference, the Publisher of The United Methodist 
Church, and the Committee on Correlation and Editorial 
Revision shall be charged with editing the Discipline. 
These editors, in the exercise of their judgment, shall 
have the authority to make changes in phraseology as may 
be necessary to harmonize legislation without changing 
its substance. The editors, in consultation with the Judi- 
cial Council, shall also have authority to delete provisions 
of the Disciphne which have been ruled unconstitutional 
by the Judicial Council. Any challenge of a decision made 
by the Committee on Correlation and Editorial Revision 
shall be in writing. If the matter should go to the Judicial 
Council, the appealing party shall give notice thereof to 
the Committee. Any estabhshed errata in the Disciphne 
shall be forwarded by the United Methodist Publishing 
House to the Council of Bishops. 

XII. Distribution to the Desks of Delegates 

After the first day, only the Daily Christian Advocate 
shall be placed on the desks of the delegates, with addi- 
tional copies for the first clergy and first lay reserve 
delegate from each delegation. 

XIII. Distribution of Unofficial Matenal 

Daily, periodic, or regular newsletters, or any special 
interest material published at General Conference by 
United Methodist boards, agencies, and related United 
Methodist groups may be distributed under the following 
conditions: 

A. Two copies of each publication shall be deposited in 
the office of the Commission on the General Conference 
in advance of the time of distribution. 

B. Material distributed should be used for information 
relative to matters that have been before or are coming 
before the General Conference and not for soliciting 
membership in an organization. 

C. Distribution shall be at least 30 feet outside any 
entrance door to the plenary or committee meeting 
rooms. 

D. Distribution shall be done by representatives of the 
pubhshing groups. Distributors shall be in the smallest 
number capable of effecting adequate distribution to those 
entering. During distribution it is the responsibility of the 
distributors not to impede or interfere with the entrance 
or exit of persons or to hamper the general flow of 
pedestrian traffic. 

E. Distributors are responsible for the disposal of un- 
used or unclaimed materials. 

F. Distn"butors violating these regulations will be pro- 
hibited from future distributions. 

XTV. Reports to be Mailed Before General Conference 
The reports, recommendations, and resolutions, re- 
quiring action by the General Conference, as well as 
petitions submitted in accordance with Discipline 608.7, 
shall first be assigned a Petition Number by the Secretary 
of the General Conference or the one designated as Peti- 
tions Secretary and then shall be printed in an Advance 
Edition of the Daily Christian Advocate and distributed to 
all delegates and to the first clergy and first lay reserve 
delegates at least sixty days prior to the opening of the 
General Conference. If necessary to meet this deadline, 
material to delegates from outside the United States shall 
be sent by air mail. Such reports shall be pnnted m the 



36 



April 17, 1S 



same size and style as the Daily Christian Advocate and 
be punched for binding. 

In order to accomplish this, the finished copy of all such 
reports and recommendations shall be submitted to the 
editor of the Daily Christian Advocate at least 120 days 
pnorto the opening of the General Conference. Any such 
reports and recommendations not so submitted and not 
printed in an Advance Edition of the Daily Chnstian 
Advocate shall be received by the General Conference 
only upon three-fourths vote of the General Conference 
The General Council on Finance and Administration shall 
be exempt from this requirement to the extent necessary 
to allow inclusion of general funds receipts mformation for 
the first three years of the quadrennium. The General 
Council on Finance and Administration will provide data 
including the third year of the quadrennium and other 
appropriate mformation to delegates prior to the conven- 
ing of the General Conference. 

Rules of Order 

I. Daily Schedule 

Rule 1. Hours of Meetings 

The following shall be the daily order for the General 
Conference, Sundays excepted: 

(1) 8:15 a.m. Choral music 

(2) 8:30 a.m. to 9:00 a.m. Devotional service under 
direction of the Council of Bishops 

(3) 9:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Conference business com- 
mittee meetings 

(4) 2:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Conference business or com- 
mittee meetings 

(5) 7:30 p.m. Evening programs as planned by the 
Commission on the General Conference, Conference 
business or committee meetings 

(6) Recess may be called during any plenary session at 
a time deemed appropriate by the bishop presiding. 

Rule 2. Order of Business 

After the devotional service, the daily sessions of the 
Conference shall be conducted as follows: 

(1) Reports of standing admmistrative and special com- 
mittees 

(2) Agenda and calendar items 

(3) Consent calendar (See Rule 28.5.) 

(4) Miscellaneous business 

II. Presiding Officers 

Rule 3. Authority of the Chairperson 

(1) The bishop presiding shall be the chairperson of the 
General Conference session. 

(2) The bishop presiding shall decide points of order 
raised by the delegates and shall rule on points of order 
not raised by delegates, as the chair deems necessary to 
conform to these rules of order, subject in both cases to 
an appeal to the Conference by any delegate without 
debate, except that the chairperson and the appellant, m 
the order here named, shall each have three minutes for 
a statement in support of their respective positions. A tie 
vote in the case of appeal shall sustain the chair. (See Rule 
26.2) Any delegate who raises a point of order shall cite 
the rule by number believed to have been violated. 

(3) The bishop presiding shall have the right to recess 
a session of the General Conference at any time at the 
chair's discretion and to reconvene at such time as the 



chair shaU announce. The bishop presiding shall also have 
the right to stipulate that the session shall reconvene with 
only delegates, authorized personnel, and authorized 
guests permitted to attend such a session following re- 
cess. 
Rule 4. Calling the Conference to Order 
When the bishop presiding calls the Conference to 
order, no member shall speak, address the chair, or stand. 
III. Rights and Duties Of Members 
Rule 5. Attendance and Seatmg Reserves 
No delegate, unless hindered by sickness or other 
emergency situation shall be absent from the sessions of 
the Conference without permission of the Conference. All 
absences shall be reported by the chairpersons of the 
several Annual Conference delegations to the Committee 
on Credentials on a form provided for this purpose. A 
reserve delegate may be seated upon authority of the 
chairperson of the delegation who shall report the substi- 
tution in wnting to the Committee on Credentials on a 
form provided for this purpose. Reserves are chosen to 
be seated: 

1. by reason of being of the same order as the absent 
member; 

2. in order of their election as reserve delegates. 

If the Committee disapproves the substitution, after 
consultation with the chairperson of the delegation, it may 
report to the General Conference with its recommenda- 
tion. The chairperson of the Committee on Credentials 
shall make a daily written report to the Secretary of the 
General Conference, listing all changes of seating. (See 
Plan of Organization I.A.4 and VIII.A.4.) 

Rule 6. Voting When On The Platform 

Electronic voting devices shall be available on the plat- 
form for delegates making a presentation to the Confer- 
ence. Reserves shall not be seated for such delegates. 

Rule 7. Directions for Securing the Floor 

A delegate desiring to speak to the Conference shall 
hold up the appropriate placard provided for that purpose. 
A delegate shall not move to the microphone until recog- 
nized by the bishop presiding. Unless raising a point of 
order or parliamentary inquiry, the delegate shall not 
speak until given the floor. The bishop presiding is re- 
quested to consider the various sections of the auditorium 
in rotation. The delegate recognized shall proceed to the 
nearest microphone and shall first announce her or his 
name and the name of the Conference represented; which 
in turn, the bishop presiding shall then announce to the 
Conference. 

Rule 8. Interrupting the Speaker 

No delegate who has the floor may be interrupted 
except for a point of order, a misrepresentation, a parlia- 
mentary inquiry, a point of information, or to call attention 
that the time has arrived for a special order. 

Rule 9. Speaking More Than Once; Length of Speech 

A. No delegate shall speak a second time on the same 
question if any delegate who has not previously spoken 
on the question desires the floor. 

B. No delegate shall speak more than twice on the same 
subject under the same motion, except as provided in Rule 
36.3. 



Daily Edition Vol.S No 2 



37 



C. No delegate shall speak longer than three minutes 
unless that time is extended by the Conference. (See Rule 
36.3) 

D. The three-minute limit on delegate speeches may 
be amended by a majority vote of the Conference at any 
time and for any period of duration. 

Rule 10. Point of Order 

A delegate wishing to raise a point of order shall address 
the bishop presiding and say, "I rise to a point of order " 
The bishop presiding shall interrupt the proceeding; if a 
delegate is speaking, that one shall immediately yield the 
floor. The bishop presiding shall then direct the delegate 
raising the point of order to state the point as briefly and 
concisely as possible, citing the rule invoked in the poml 
of order but the delegate shall not presume to decide the 
question or argue the point. 

A point of order is decided by the bishop presiding 
without debate unless in doubtful cases the chair submits 
the question to the body for advice or decision. When the 
bishop presiding rules on a point, debate is closed, but the 
decision may be appealed. 

Rule 11. Bar of the Conference 

The bar of the conference shall provide for the integrity 
of the General Conference. It is for delegates, pages, and 
others who have been granted access to the area for 
General Conference business. Delegates are not to dis- 
tract others near them by engaging in unrelated business 
activity. 

Rule 12. Voting Procedure 

(1) Votmg shall be by electronic means unless other- 
wise ordered by the Conference, provided, however, that 
in elections, voting may be by written ballot. 

(2) When electronic voting is not m use, a standing 
count vote or vote by secret ballot may be ordered on call 
of any delegate, supported by one-third of the delegates 
present and voting. 

(3) If the event the electronic voting system is moper- 
able, the chairpersons of the delegations shall poll their 
respective delegations. 

(4) Only delegates within the bar of the Conference 
when the vote is taken shall be entitled to vote. No 
delegate shall cast a vote in place of any other delegate. 

(5) No other business shall be in order when a vote is 
being taken or when the previous question has been called 
until the process is completed, except such as relates to 
the vote itself or such business as the chair may deem 
appropriate. 

Rule 13. Division of Question 

Before a vote is taken, any delegate shall have the nght 
to call for a division of any question, if it is subject to such 
division as the delegate indicates. If no delegate objects, 
the division shall be made; but if there is objection, the 
chair shall put the question of division to vote, not waiting 
for a second. 

rV. Business Procedure 

Rule 14. Motion for Adoption of Reports 

Whenever a report of a committee signed by the chair- 
person and secretary thereof shall be presented to the 
Conference for its action, it shall be deemed in proper 
order for consideration by the Conference without the 
formality of a second. 



Rule 15. Required Forms for Reports, Resolution, Mo- 
tions, Amendments 

All resolutions and committee reports shall be prepared 
in triplicate; and motions, including amendments, shall be 
presented m writing. (See Rules 28.2, 31.2, 33.) 

Rule 16. Alterations of Motions, Etc. 

When a motion is made and seconded or a resolution is 
introduced and seconded or a committee report is read or 
is published in the Daily Christian Advocate, it shall be 
deemed to be in the possession of the Conference and may 
not be altered except by action of the Conference. (Sec 
Rule 32.) 

Rule 17. Undebatable Motions 

The following motions shall be acted upon without 
debate: 

(1) To adjourn, when unqualified, except to adjourn the 
Conference finally 

(2) To suspend the rules 

(3) To lay on the table, except as provided in Rule 36 

(4) To take from the table 

(5) To call for the previous questions (See Rule 22) 

(6) To reconsider a non-debatable motion (See Rule 27) 

(7) To limit or extend the limits of debate 
Rule 18. Rights of the Main Question 

The main question may be opened to debate under the 
following motions: to adopt, to commit or refer, to substi- 
tute, to postpone, and to reconsider. No new motion, 
resolutions, or subject shall be entertained until the one 
under consideration shall have been disposed of, except 
as provided in Rule 12.5. The foregoing does not apply to 
secondary motions if otherwise allowable. 
Rule 19. Precedence of Secondary Motions 
If any one or more of the following motions shall be 
made when one or more other motions are pending, the 
order of their precedence in relation to one another shall 
be the same as the order of their hsting below: 

(1) To fix the time to which the conference shall ad- 
journ. (This motion is subject to amendment, or it may be 
laid to the table.) 

(2) To adjourn 

(3) To take a recess 

(4) To lay on the table 

(5) To order the previous question (See Rules 22, 24.) 

(6) To limit or extend the limits of debate 

(7) To postpone to a given time 

(8) To commit or refer 

(9) To amend or to amend by substitution (one amend- 
ment being allowed to an amendment) 

(10) To postpone indefinitely 

Rule 20. Motion to Adjourn in Order Except: 
The motion to adjourn, when unqualified, shall be taken 
without debate and shall always be in order, except: 

(1) When a delegate has the floor 

(2) When a question is actually put or a vote is being 
taken and before it is finally decided 

(3) When the previous question has been ordered and 
action thereunder is pending 

(4) When a motion to adjourn has been lost and no 
busmess or debate has intervened 

(5) When the motion to fix the time to which the 
conference shall adjourn is pending 



38 



April 17, 1996 



The foregoing does not apply to a motion for final 
adjournment of the Conference. 

Rule 21. Tabhng Related Motions 

No motion which adheres to another motion or has 
another motion adhering to it can be laid on the table by 
Itself. Such motions, if laid on the table, carry with them 
the motions to which they adhere or which adhere to 
them. 

Rule 22. Previous Question 

Any member who moves the previous question (that is 
that the "vote be now taken on the motion or motions 
pending) shall also indicate to what it is intended to apply, 
if any secondary motion or motions are also pending. If 
said member does not so indicate, it shall be regarded as 
applying only to the immediately pending question. This 
motion shall be taken without debate and shall require a 
two-thirds vote of those present and voting for its adop- 
tion; if it is adopted, the vote shall be taken on the motion 
or motions to which it applies without further debate 
except as provided m Rule 36. (See also Rules 17, 24e 
25.) 

Rule 23. Refemng Reports, Etc 

It shall be in order for the Conference to refer to a 
com mittce a section or part of a report or resolution which 
is before the Conference for consideration of any amend- 
ment offered thereto. 

Rule 24. Procedure for Amending by Substitution 

(A) When a resolution or committee report is properly 
before the Conference for consideration and action, even 
if amendments are pending, a substitute may be offered 
by any member moving that the same be substituted for 
the report, resolution, or amendment under considera- 
tion. The substitute shall be an alternative to what is 
before the house and not simply a negation of the main 
motion. 

(B) The Conference shall proceed first to perfect the 
original report or resolution, including consideration and 
action upon any amendments which may be offered to it. 

(C) The same perfecting process shall be followed with 
respect to the substitute. 

(D) The questions shall be put first on the motion to 
substitute, followed by the motion to adopt the report or 
resolution. 

(E) The motion for the previous questions shall not be 
in order on the adoption of the report or recommendation 
or on making the proposed substitution until opportunity 
has been given for at least two members to speak on each 
side of the question of substitution or adoption. (Also see 
35.2 for handling minority reports.) 

Rule 25. Unlawful Motion After Speech 

It shall not be in order for a delegate immediately after 
discussing a pending question and before relinquishmg 
the floor to make a motion which, if adopted, would limit 
or stop debate. 

Rule 26. Exceptions to Majority Vote. 

A majority of those voting, quorum being present (Dis- 
cipline 607), shall decide all questions, with the followmg 
exceptions; 

(1) One-third of those present and votmg shall suffice 
to sustain a call for a recorded vote in case the decision of 
the chair is doubted. (See Rule 12.2.) 



(2) A tie vote sustains the chair. (Rule 3.2.) 

(3) A two-thirds vote shall be required to sustain a 
motion to suspend (Rule 38) or amend (Rule 39) the rules; 
to set aside a special order (Rule 28.1); to consider a 
special order before the time set therefore; to sustain the 
request of the Committee on Courtesies and Pnvileges 
for the presentation of any person after the sixth day of 
the General Conference. (Plan of Organization Vin.A.3.) 

(4) A call for the previous question is a motion to 
suspend the rules and therefore requires a two-thirds 
vote 

(5) A two-thirds vote shall be required to approve a 
proposal for a constitutional amendment. (Discipline, 62- 
64.) 

Rule 27. Reconsideration 

A motion to reconsider an action of the Conference shall 
be in order at any time if offered by a delegate who voted 
with the prevailing side. If the motion it is proposed to 
reconsider is non-debatable, the motion to reconsider 
may not be debated. (See Rule 16.) 

Rule 28. Regular Calendar and Consent Calendar 

(1) The Secretary shall keep the Calendar which in- 
cludes the orders of the day and the reports of committees 
(See Rule 31). Business placed on the calendar shall be 
considered in the order recommended by the Committee 
on Agenda and Calendar, unless by two-thirds vote of the 
Conference, an item is taken up out of its order. (See Rule 
26.3.) 

(2) When a committee presents a report, it shall also 
list the numbers of all petitions relating to the report on 
which the committee voted non-concurrence so that all 
related matters may be considered together. (See Rules 
30.3,31,33.) 

(3) Action from a legislative committee shall be placed 
on the Consent Calendar if: 

(a) No more than five votes were cast against the 
prevailing position in the Committtee; 

(b) The item has been previously printed in The Daily 
Christian Advocate; 

(c) The item has been in the hands of delegates for at 
least 24 hours; and 

(d) The item is neither a constitutional amendment nor 
one having financial implications. 

(4) The Daily Chnstian Advocate shall clearly identify 
the Consent Calendar which will list items in three sec- 
tions sub-headed as follows: 

(a) Discipline Changes Concurrence 

(b) Non-Discipline Items Concurrence 

(c) Discipline and Non-Discipline Items Nonconcur- 
rence 

(5) The Consent Calendar shall be called up daily pur- 
suant to Rule 2. Adoption of the Consent Calendar by vote 
of the Conference shall be deemed action on all calendar 
items on the Consent Calendar. 

(6) Any five delegates may have a Consent Calendar 
Item removed by having such a request on file with the 
Secretary by 3:00 p.m. of the day the calendar item first 
appears in The Daily Chnstian Advocate. Such items 
shall be called up in the regular order of business. 

Rule 29. Rules of Order of Legislative Committees 



Daily Edition Vol.3 No. 2 



39 



The rules of order of the General Conference, except 
for Rule 36, shall be observed in meetings of standing 
legislative committees insofar as they apply 

Rule 30. Duties and Prerogatives of Legislative Com- 
mittees 

(1) Following election and orientation of officers, as its 
first order of business, each committee shall utilize the 
resources of its legislative coordinator. Each committee 
shall evaluate the petitions assigned to the committee, 
estabhsh pnonties, and outhne the committee's work on 
the basis of those pnorities unless it is given special 
instructions by the General Conference. (See Plan of 
Organization Vni.A.(7)(a).) 

(2) When a petition or resolution or any smiilar item is 
referred to one of the several standing legislative commit- 
tees, it shall be understood that the whole question with 
which the paper has to do is referred to that committee 
for such action as it may deem wise. In addition to concur- 
rence and non-concurrence, a committee may recom- 
mend action or referral to the next General Conference 
or to a board, council, commission, or committee either 
for action or for report to the next General Conference 

(3) Committees shall report to the Conference upon all 
matters referred to them by the Conference, directly or 
through the Committee on Reference. Committee re- 
ports on resolutions, petitions, etc., shall cite the same 
identifying them by nu mbers they bear respectively in the 
published reports of the Committee on Reference or in 
some other suitable manner. 

(4) When a committee ascertains that another commit- 
tee is, or in its judgment should be, considering a subject 
which the former is considering, it shall report the matter 
to the Committee on Reference for such adjustment as 
the situation may require. 

Rule 31. Legislative Committee Report to the Daily 
Christian Advocate 

(1) As quickly as material can be prepared, each secre- 
tary of a standing legislative committee shall present each 
of the committee's reports to a recorder assigned to the 
committee. The recorder will prepare the report and send 
it to the Daily Christian Advocate. A copy of the report as 
It will appear in the Daily Christian Advocate will be sent 
to the chair and vice chair for their approval and signature. 
After copy has been approved, it will be returned to the 
Daily Christian Advocate. A calendar number will be 
assigned and it will be printed as approved. 

(2) Committee and minority reports which propose 
changes in the Discipline shall give chapter, section, and 
paragraph to be affected and shall be prepared m the 
following manner. 

Existing words used as reference points shall be in 
quotation marks; words to be deleted shall be single-un- 
derscored; words to be added shall be double-under- 
scored. In the pubhcation of these reports, the Daily 
Chnstian Advocate shall substitute italics for single un- 
derscoring and boldface for double underscoring. (See 
Rule 33.) 

Rule 32. Published Reports in Possession of Confer- 
ence 

Reports submitted by the committee according to the 
deadline, as announced by the Secretary of the Confer- 
ence, shall appear in the next day's Daily Chnstian Advo- 



cate The report as printed in the Daily Christian Advo- 
cate becomes the official copy, subject only to grammati- 
cal or other obvious editonal changes and shall be 
regarded as in the possession of the Conference. On the 
day followmg its first appearance in the Daily Chnstian 
Advocate or any time thereafter, a report is in order for 
consideration at the pleasure of the conference. The same 
rule shall apply to a report of a minority of any committee. 
(See Rules 16, 35.) 
Rule 33. Preparation and Pnnting of Reports 

(1) All committee reports shall be presented to the 
Daily Chnstian Advocate on a form provided therefore 
and using a process approved by the Secretary of the 
Conference. The form shall bear at the top the name of 
the committee, its total membership, the number present 
at the time the report was adopted, the number voting for 
and against the report, respectively, and the number not 
votmg. (See Rule 15, 28.2, 30.3, 31.) 

(2) Consent Calendar items (see Rule 28.3, 4) shall be 
clearly marked with an identifying symbol on the report 
cover and in the Daily Christian Advocate printing, this 
symbol to be supplied by the General Conference Secre- 
tary 

(3) Reports of the standing legislative committees shall 
be pnnted in the Daily Chnstian Advocate at least one day 
before being presented for consideration by the Confer- 
ence. Committee reports to which minority reports are 
appended shall be printed in sequence, and so numbered. 

(4) Every effort should be made by the secretary of the 
Legislative Committee to report consecutively all peti- 
tions which address the same issue. 

Rule 3. Committee Chairperson Not in Harmony with 
Report 

When the chairperson of a committee is not in harmony 
with a report adopted by the committee, it shall be the 
chairperson's duty to state the fact to the committee. The 
committee shall elect one of its members to present it in 
the presentation and discussion of the report in the Con- 
ference. If, in such a case, the committee shall fail to select 
a representative, the chairperson shall designate a mem- 
ber to represent the committee, and said representative 
shall have all the rights and pnvileges of the chairperson 
in relation to such report. 

Rule 35. Minority Report 

(1) Minority reports represented as substitutes for a 
committee report shall conform to Rule 24 and Rule 31 
respectively and indicate the specific report number with 
which it relates. The names of the members of the com- 
mittee signing the report shall be indicated. A minority 
report shall be signed by one-tenth or by ten members of 
the committee, whichever is the lesser. 

(2) A minority report shall be processed as a substitu- 
tion for the report of the committee pursuant to Rule 24 
as would any other substitute. 

(3) A member selected by the signers of the report of a 
rainonty of a committee to present the same shall have 
the same rights and pnvileges in relation thereto which 
belong to the chairperson in the presentation of the com- 
mittee report. In closing debate on the minonty report, 
the member presenting the minonty report shall speak 
first and the chairperson last. 

Rule 36. Speakers For and Against 



40 



April17, 1996 



(1) When the report of a committee is under considera- 
tion, it shall be the duty of the presiding bishop to ascer- 
tain, when recognizmg a member of the Conference, on 
which side the member proposes to speak; the chair shall 
not assign the floor to any member proposing to speak on 
the same side of the pending question as the speaker 
immediately preceding if any member desires to speak on 
the other side thereof. 

(2) Except for undebatable motions (Rule 17), no report 
shall be adopted or question relating to the same decided 
without opportunity having been given for at least two 
speeches for and two against the said proposal After 
three speeches for and three against and provided no 
secondary motions come before the floor, the questions 
shall be put automatically. However, the chairperson 
and/or duly authorized member or members presentmg 
the committee's report (and the minority report chairper- 
son or representative if there be one) shall be entitled to 
speak before the vote is taken. (See Rule 35.) 

(3) The right of the chairperson and/or other member 
or members to close the debate shall prevail in like 
manner to a limit of three minutes when a vote is about 
to be taken on a motion to amend, to substitute to 
postpone, to refer, or to lay on the table or any other 
motion whose adoption would vitally affect the report 
under consideration. (See Rules 9, 35.) 

Rule 37. Effective Date 

All legislation of the General Conference of the United 
Methodist Church shall become effective January 1 fol- 
lowing the session of the General Conference at which it 
is enacted, unless otherwise specified. (See Discipline H 
609.) 

VI. Suspending, Amending, and Supplementing 

Rule 38. Suspension of the Rules 

The operation of any of the provisionz of the Plan of 
Organization or of these Rules of Order may be suspended 
at any time by two-thirds vote of the Conference. (See 
Rule 26.3.) 

Rule 39. Amending Rules 

The plan of Organization and these Rules of Order may 
be amended or changed by a two-thirds vote of the Con- 
ference; provided the proposed change or amendment has 
onginated in the Committee on Plan of Organization and 
Rules of Order or has been presented to the Conference 
m writing and referred to this committee, which commit- 



tee shall report thereon not later than the following day, 
(See Rule 26.3 and Plan of Organization VII.B.) 

The Plan of Organization and Rules of Order as adopted 
at the opening session shall be printed in the next Daily 
Chnstian Advocate. 

Rule 40. Robert's Rules of Order, Supplemental 
Authority 

In any parliamentary situation not covered by the Plan 
of Organization or these Rules of Order, the General 
Conference shall be governed in its action by the current 
edition of Robert's Rules of Order. 

Rule 41. Persons Without Right to Make or Second 
Motion 

A person seated in the conference with the right to 
speak, but without vote, does not have the right to make 
a motion or second motions. 

Recommendation Number Two 

We propose that the Study on Ministry come before the 
General (Conference using the following process: 

1. The Council of Bishops will present its Study on 
Mimstry to the General Conference in plenary on 
Wednesday morning, April 17, as an order of the day, 

2. Following this presentation, the body of the General 
Conference will be divided into 25 randomly selected 
non-legislative groups for reflection and dialogue on the 
study. 

3. Each group will meet for 90 minutes guided by a 
convenor Bishop selected by the Council of Bishops. 

4. Each group will be provided a recorder who is a 
non-delegate and who has been trained by UMCom. 

5. On Wednesday evening, April 17, the convenors and 
recorders will meet to compare experiences and to iden- 
tify areas of consensus among the groups as well as issues 
or questions related to the study which were not ad- 
dressed in the Wednesday morning presentation. 

6. The convenor and recorder will provide the General 
Conference on Thursday morning, April 18, with a written 
report-for-infonnation of their observations. The Gen- 
eral Secretary of UMCom will present a brief oral sum- 
mary of the report. The Bishop presenting the Study on 
Ministry report will have opportunity for additional com- 
ments. 

7. The study will then move to the legislative commit- 
tee to which it has been assigned and follow the legislative 
process in accordance with the Plan of Organization and 
Rules of Order adopted by the General Conference. 



Daily Edition Vol.S No. 2 



Announcements 



Receipts are not required for travel expense after Gen- 
eral Conference concludes. Please estimate these ex- 
penses based on your experience travelling to General 
Conference and list them on the expense form distributed 
Tuesday, April 16. Receipts are also not required if you 
stayed overnight in Denver on April 15 and you are paying 
the total bill upon check-out. 

The trustees and the president of Garrett-Evangelical 
will host a dinner in recognition and celebration of theo- 
logical education for a new century of service — "Bold 
Leaders for a New World" on Saturday, April 20, at 
Executive Tower Inn, 1405 Curtis St., 5:30 p.m. A limited 
number of reservations will be available at the door 
Tickets are $12.50 per person 

Northern Dlinois Conference dinner will be Tuesday, 
April 23, 5:30 p.m. at the Hohday Inn, 1450 Glenarm St 
$22 per person. For reservations, contact Emery Percell. 

Last call! Reservations for the Baltimore-Washington 
Conference Delegation and co-workers dinner to be held 
Saturday, April 20 at the Marriott from 5:15-7:15 p.m is 3 
p.m. today. Contact Patsy Barton at the Hohday Inn, 
Room 1419. 573-1450. 

The Committee on Hispanic Ministries invites you to 
our Hospitality Center, Hyatt Regency, suite 1701, Wel- 
ton and 17th. Information on the National Hispanic Plan, 
Hispanic Ministries,and other related Hispanic initiatives 
is available. Every delegate that stops by will receive a 
special gift. Open Monday-Fri 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. and Satur- 
day noon -5 p.m. 



Bible study using the methodology of othe National 
Hispanic Plan will be held Thursday - Saturday 7 a.m. - 8 
a.m. in A102 of the Convention Center. 

Save the soap and shampoo! Bring you unused soap 
bars and shampoo bottles to the UM Rural Fellowship 
Hospitality Suite, room 2120 for inclusion in one of the 
UMRF's mission shipments to Africa. 

Have you signed up for a Sunday tour? If so, please pick 
up your ticket at the information booth, (Lobby A) and let 
us know yuor local address. If not, there is still room for 
tours to Cheyenne, the High Plains, Colorado Springs, or 
Denver. Also, consider "mini-tours" during the week of 
various local sites. 

Buses taking participants to the luncheon Encounter 
with Chnst in Latin America and the Caribbean on Thurs- 
day will depart at 12 noon and 12:35 p.m. from the front 
of the Convention Center. (12:30 p.m. for bishops in front 
oftheMariott Hotel.) 

Black Methodists for Church Renewal invites you to a 
dinner honoring our EBONY bishops on Sunday, April 21 
at 5 p.m. at Scott UMC. Tickets $10. Reservations must 
be paid by Thursday noon, April 18. See Ethel Johnson 
or any BMCR observer for a reservation. 

Methodist Theological School in Ohio (METHESCO) 
with Presdient Ned Dewire will hold a breakfast for 
alumni, students, faculty, and friends on Thursday, April 
18, from 7-9 a.m. in Grand BaUroom D and E, lobby level, 
at Adams' Mark Hotel. The buffet breakfast is $10 (except 
for students). Space is available for eight more. 



Daily Choir Concerts 
2 p.m, Hall A 



April 17: McCurdy School Choir, Espaiiola, New Mex- 
ico, Paula Nichols, director 
April 18: The Maranatha Choir, University UMC, 
Gainesville, Fla., Robert W. Jackson, director 
April 19: Choir of the First UMC, Peona, 111., Timothy 
M. Coday, director 

April 20: Mass Choir St. Luke Community UMC, Dallas 
Tex., Monya Logan, director 

April 22: Coral Metodista Unida de Nueva York, New 
York, N.Y., Jorge Lockward, director 
April 23: Indonesia Choir of the Methodist Church of In- 
donesia, Eunice Sitompul, director (c/o Fred Ingold, 
Estes Park, Colo.) 

April 24: Lover's Lane Jazz Band, Lover's Lane UMC, 
Dallas, Tex. 

April 25: Christ UMC Deaf and Sign Choir, Baftimorc, 
M.D., Peggy Johnson, director 



Apnl 26: Iluzija Choir, UMC, Liepaja, Latvia, Guntra 

Pluce, director, c/o Russell T. Montfort, Chariotte, N.C. 

Choir presented in plenary session by Board of 

Higher Education & Ministry 

April 23: Africa University Choir, Mutare, Zimbabwe, 

Patnck Matsikenyiri, director 

Choir for presentation of UM Hispanic Hymnal 

April 20: Coral Metodista Unida de Nueva York, New 

York, N.Y., Jorge Lockward, director 

Organists for General Conference 

Austin Lovelace, Denver, Colo. 

Kathleen Forsberg, Littleton UMC, Littleton, Colo. 

Pianists for General Conference 

Richard Forsberg, Littleton, Colo. 

Johnetta Johnson Page 



Petitions Referred to a new Legislative Committee 



April 17, 1996 



Petition No. 


From 


To 


21718 


CO 


GJ 


21719 


CO 


GJ 


23026 


CO 


GJ 


20157 


cs 


GJ 


20904 


cs 


GJ 


21647 


cs 


GJ 


22544 


cs 


GJ 


21648 


DI 


GJ 


21399 


DI 


GJ 


20593 


FA 


GJ 


20603 


FA 


GJ 


20605 


FA 


GJ 


20774 


FA 


GJ 


21482 


FA 


GJ 


21569 


FA 


GJ 


21630 


FA 


GJ 


23071 


FA 


GJ 


20887 


GJ 


CS 


21423 


GJ 


DI 


20625 


GM 


GJ 


21325 


GM 


GJ 


21326 


GM 


GJ 


21328 


GM 


GJ 


21329 


GM 


GJ 


21330 


GM 


GJ 


21336 


GM 


GJ 


21661 


GM 


GJ 


21663 


HE 


GJ 


20636 


IC 


GJ 


20640 


IC 


GJ 


20644 


IC 


GJ 


20646 


IC 


GJ 


20647 


IC 


GJ 


20766 


IC 


GJ 


21070 


IC 


GJ 


21377 


IC 


GJ 


21668 


IC 


GJ 


21669 


IC 


GJ 


21670 


IC 


GJ 


21671 


IC 


GJ 


22793 


IC 


GJ 


21425 


LC 


DI 


21426 


LC 


DI 


21427 


LC 


DI 


21428 


LC 


DI 



Petition No. 


From 


To 


21429 


LC 


DI 


21430 


LC 


DI 


21431 


LC 


DI 


21432 


LC 


DI 


21433 


LC 


DI 


21434 


LC 


DI 


21435 


LC 


DI 


21436 


LC 


DI 


21437 


LC 


DI 


21438 


LC 


DI 


21439 


LC 


DI 


21440 


LC 


DI 


21441 


LC 


DI 


21443 


LC 


DI 


21444 


LC 


DI 


21445 


LC 


DI 


21446 


LC 


DI 


21451 


LC 


DI 


21517 


LC 


DI 


22108 


LC 


DI 


22365 


LC 


DI 


22718 


LC 


DI 


20799 


MN 


LC 


20824 


MN 


GJ 


21264 


MN 


GJ 


21263 


MN 


GJ 


21373 


MN 


CS 


21424 


MN 


DI 


21456 


MN 


DI 


21457 


MN 


DI 


21546 


MN 


GJ 


21550 


MN 


GJ 


21551 


MN 


GJ 


21552 


MN 


GJ 


21553 


MN 


GJ 


21725 


MN 


CO 


22101 


MN 


HE 


22390 


MN 


GJ 


22392 


MN 


GJ 


22393 


MN 


GJ 


22394 


MN 


GJ 


22395 


MN 


GJ 


22605 


MN 


GJ 


22859 


MN 


IC 


22946 


MN 


HE 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No. 2 



11905. 

Petition Number: 2307 1-GJ -905.1 - 

D; GCOM. 

Organization 

Delete H 905.1 and replace with new 
text: 



I— a) 

The voting members of the Council 
shall be elected quadrennially by the 
General Conference and shall consist 
of forty (40) persons nominated as fol- 
lows: 

(1) three bishops nominated by the 
Council of Bishops; 

(2) six persons from each jurisdic- 
tion nominated by the bishops of that- 
jurisdiction; 

(3) one person from an annual con- 
ference in the central conferences 
nominated bythe Council of Bishops; 
and 

(4) six members at large, at least 
one of whom shall be a youth under 
the age ofeighteen and at least one of 
whom shall not be over thirty years of 
age at the time of election, and most 
of whom shall be elected for special 
skills. The members at large shall be 
nominated by the Council of Bishops 
without reference to jurisdictions. 

b)h is recommended that attention 
be given to ensuring adequaterepre- 
sentation of racial and ethnic groups, 
with at least two of the at-large mem- 
bers to be racial and ethnic persons. 
It is further recommended that in the 
membership from each of the jurisdic- 
tions and the at-large members, one- 
third be laywomen. 

c) The general secretaries who 
serve as the chief executive officersof 
the general agencies and the publish- 
er of The United Methodist Church 
shall be members of the council but 
without vote. 

d) The voting members, including 
bishops, shall not be eligible for mem- 
bership on, or emplo>Tnent by, any 
other general agency of The United 
Methodist Church (11 801.2), except 
where the Book of Discipline specifi- 
cally provides for such interagency 
representation. Members shall also 
be guided by such conflict of interest 
policies and provisions as may from 
time to time be adopted by the Gen- 
eral Conference or by the council it- 
self. 



Additional Petitions 

e) Members shall serve until their 
successors are elected andqualified. 

/^Vacancies occurring between ses- 
sions of the General Conferenceshall 
be filled by the council on nomination 
of the College of Bishops of the juris- 
diction concerned (see H 812), if the 
vacancy is among members chosen to 
represent a jurisdiction or, in the 
event of a vacancy among the episco- 
pal, central conference or at-large 
members, on nomination of the Coun- 
cil of Bishops. 



moi. 



Petition Number: 23072-LC-lOl- 

D;RKM. 

The Mission and Ministry of the 

Church 



Action: It is requested that the General 
Conference delete paragraphs 102 and 
103 from The Book of Discipline and re- 
place paragraph 101 with the following: 

TITLE: Mission and Ministry of the 
Church Statement 
Mission: 

The mission of the Church is to make 
disciples of Christ Jesus who will claim 
their ministry as agents of God's kingdom. 

Rationale of Our Mission: 

Jesus' words in Mark 1:14 ("The time 
is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God has 
come near; repent, and believe in the good 
news"), announced to the world his Gos- 
pel mission and ours. Jesus' entire minis- 
iry and disciple recruitment was directed 
to announcing and demonstrating God's 
kingdom as a present and coming reality; 
i.e., the reign and realm wherein God's 
loving will is done on earth as it is in 
heaven. Mark's account of Jesus' closing 
great commission, "Go into all the world 
and proclaim the good news (of the king- 
dom) to the whole creation".(Mark 14:15), 
coupled with Matthew's account of that 
commission (Matt. 28:19:20), "Go there- 
fore and make disciples of all nations, bap- 
tizing them in the name of the Father and 
of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and 
teaching them to obey everything that I 
have commanded you," provide the im- 
pulse and direction of our mission. 

This kingdom mission is an expression 
of God's larger work in creation. God 
seeks to restore human beings and all 
creation to the righteousness ("right rela- 



tions") which God intends. God's grace is 
active everywhere, at all times, carrying 
out this purpose as revealed in the Bible. 
It is expressed in God's covenant with 
Abraham and Sarah, in the Exodus of Is- 
rael from Egypt, and in interpreted follow- 
ing the Babylonian Captivity, that graceful 
purpose is fully embodied in the life, 
death, and resurrection of Chnst Jesus. It 
IS experienced in the ongoing creation of 
a new people by Chnst's Holy Spirit, or, 
as Jesus called himself, "the Spurit of 
truth," (John 14:17). As the Apostle Paul 
put it: "The Lord is the Spirit." (2 Cor. 
3:17) 

Whenever Christian disciples have had 
a clear sense of God's kingdom mission, 
God has used the Church as the agent of 
salvation (sotena, i.e.. wholeness) to save 
persons, heal relationships, and change 
social structures; thereby transforming 
the world. In order to be fully alive (what 
Jesus called "eternal life,"] we embrace 
Jesus' mandate to proclaim the good news 
of the kingdom and make disciples of all 
peoples. 

The Process for Carrying Out Our Mis- 
sion: 

We make disciples and kingdom agents 
as we: 

- proclaim the good news of the king- 
dom, seeking, welcoming, and gathering 
persons into the Body of Chnst, the com- 
munity of faith; 

- lead persons to commit their lives to 
the God we meet in Chnst Jesus and help 
equip them to claim their own ministry as 
agents of God's kingdom; 

-nurture and equip persons in Chnstian 
living through teaching and under- 
standing the means of grace: worship, 
baptism, communion, Bible study and 
prayer. 

- continue the ministry of the kingdom 
begun by Jesus when he said: "The Spirit 
of the Lord is upon me. because he has 
anointed me to bring good news to the 
poor. He has sent me to proclaim release 
to the captives and recovery of sight to the 
blind, to let the oppressed go free, to pro- 
claim the year of the Lord's favor." (Luke 
4:18-19) 

- send persons into the world equipped 
to live lovingly and justly as disciples by 
healing the sick, feeding the hungry, car- 
ing for the stranger, and freeing the op- 
pressed, as signs of Chnst's presence in 
that kingdom where God's will is done. 

Faithfulness and effectiveness demand 
that all ministries of the Church, whether 
by ordained or baptized ministers, be 



Apnl 17, 1996 



shaped by Christ Jesus' own mission, join- 
ing him in making disciples who will pro- 
claim in word and deed the good news of 
the kingdom. 

Rationale: 

The United Methodist Church needs to 
refocus its life and mission upon that 
which unites us: Christ Jesus and his king- 
dom mission. Tragically, many groups and 
individuals within Methodism have fo- 
cused on lesser issues (John Wesley 
called them "non-essentials") which di- 
vide us. We are a people passionate about 
many "things:" the race thing, the war 
thing, the sexuality thing, the poverty 
thing, the justice thing, etc. We need to 
rediscover the word of Jesus, that if we 
"seek first the kingdom of God and his 
nghteousness," the answers to these 
other "things" will be provided as well. By 
clearly reaffirming in The Book of Disci- 
pUne that our mission is consonant with 
the mission of our Lord, we can recover 
not only the vision but the power to use 
our great gifts and diversity to "serve the 
present age, our calling to fulfill." 



11452. 

Petition Number: 23073-MN-452.1- 

D; Rev. Joe L. Sparks, Jr., Little 

Rock. 

Mandatory Retirement 

Delete H 452.1 and substitute new text: 



-No clergy member of 
an annual conference shall be for- 
cedto retire because of his or her age. 



11253. 



Petition Number: 23074-LC-253.2- 

D;Nebraska. 

Retired Diaconal Ministers 

Amend H 247.2: 

2. ...together with retired ordained min- 
isters and retired diaconalministers 
who elect to hold... 

Petition Number: 23075-DI-NonDis- 

O; GBOD. 

UM Emphasis on Youth and Young 

Adults 

Basis: In a survey conducted by Search 
Institute (Minneapolis, Minnesota) it was 
found that only a small minority of youth 
in Protestant congregations expenence a 
life-transforming faith that is charac- 
terized by a strong relationship with God. 



Two-thirds of youth said they have a dor- 
mant or under-developed faith. 

In the same Search Institute survey, a 
small percentage of youth indicate that 
they actively engage their faith through 
prayer, Bible reading, service to others, or 
other spiritual growth activities. 

Fewer than half of the youth in the 
Search Institute survey say their church 
challenges them to think and few have 
meaningful relationships with adults in 
their congregations. 

Young adults experience similar prob- 
lems with faith formation issues to con- 
nect with the church. 

One of the ways for the church to turn 
these dismal statistics around and make 
the church a place where youth and young 
adults want to be, is to put a high priority 
on youth ministries and young adult min- 
istries. 

In a survey conducted by Group Pub- 
lishing, it states that 80% of families with 
children say youth ministry is a major 
factor in choosing a church. 

In the same survey, 57% of families 
stated the reason they joined their pre- 
sent church is the strong youth ministry 
program. 

Conclusion: The 1995 National Youth 
Ministry Organization Legislative As- 
sembly calls for a youth and young adult 
emphasis for The United Methodist 
Church during the 1997-2000 quadren- 
nium. 

Petition Number: 23076-CS-NonDis- 
O!; Lydick, Howard, First United 
Methodist Chiu-ch, Richardson, TX. 
Standing Commission on Alcohol 
and Drugs 

In order to make more effectual the 
efforts of The United Methodist Church in 
creating a Christian public sentiment and 
in crystallizing opposition to all public vio- 
lations of the moral law, and especially to 
oppose the many evils existing in society 
caused by the consumption of alcoholic 
beverages and other drugs, there shall be 
a Standing General Commission on Alco- 
hol and Drugs, hereinafter known as the 
commission. 

Its headquarters shall be in Washing- 
ton, DC. 

Purpose: 

The object and duty of the commission 
shall be to promote by an intensive educa- 
tional program voluntary total abstinence 
from all intoxicants and narcotics; the edu- 
cational program to include the use of 
radio, television, publication and distnbu- 
tion of literature: to promote observance 
and enforcement of constitutional provi- 



sions and statutory enactments that sup- 
press the traffic in alcoholic beverages and 
in narcotic drugs; and to promote the 
speedy enactment of such legislation 
throughout the world. 

Incorporation: 

The commission shall be incorporated 
in the Distnct of Columbia. The commis- 
sion shall be the legal successor and suc- 
cessor in trust of the corporations, boards, 
departments or entities known as the De- 
partment of Human Welfare of the Gen- 
eral board of Church and Society of The 
United Methodist Church; the Division of 
General Welfare of the General Board of 
Church and Society of The Untied Meth- 
odist Church; the Division of General 
Welfare of the General Board of Christian 
Social Concerns of The United Methodist 
Church; the Department of Christian So- 
cial Action of the EvangeUcal United 
Brethren Church; the Division of Alcohol 
Problems and General Welfare of the 
General Board of Christian Social Con- 
cerns of the Methodist Church; the Divi- 
sion of Temperance and General Welfare 
of the General Board of Christian Social 
Concerns of the Methodist Church; the 
Board of Temperance of the Methodist 
Church; and the Board of Temperance, 
Prohibition and Pubhc Morals of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Membership: 

The commission shall consist of thirty 
persons elected by the jurisdictional con- 
ferences and three bishops elected by the 
Council of Bishops. Those elected to the 
commission shall be chosen solely for 
their demonstrated concern about the 
problems caused in our society by the 
presence and use of alcoholic beverages 
and other drugs. Each jurisdiction shall 
elect sLx persons from the Ust of persons 
proposed for general agency membership 
by the annual conferences. A jurisdiction 
may elect a maximum of four clergy mem- 
bers or four lay members. At the fiirst 
meeting of each quadrennium and each 
annual meeting thereafter, the commis- 
sion may elect an additional person or 
persons based on special expertise that 
will be of assistance to the commission, 
provided that a maximum of five such per- 
sons may be elected each quadrennium. 

Vacancies in the commission member- 
ship shall be filled by the procedure de- 
fined in H 812 of the General Provisions. 

Officers: 

The officers of the commission shall be 
a president, a vice president, a secretary, 
and a treasurer. 

Executive Committee: 

The commission shall have an execu- 
tive committee composed of the elected 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No. 2 



45 



officers and two additional persons se- 
lected by the commission from among its 
other members. The general secretary 
shall be a member of the executive com- 
mittee, with a voice but not the right to 
vote. The committee shall have the power 
ad interim to fill any vacancies occurring 
in the elected staff and to transact such 
business and adopt such resolutions and 
statements as are authorized between the 
meetings of the commission. It shall re- 
port all of its actions to the commission 
promptly after each of its meetings and 
again for confirmation at the next meeting 
of the commission. 

Meetings: 

The commission shall hold an annual 
meeting at a time and place to be deter- 
mined by its executive committee and 
such other meetings as its work may re- 
quire, and shall enact suitable bylaws gov- 
erning the activities of the commission 
and its employees. A majority of the mem- 
bership shall constitute a quorum. 

Staff: 

The commission shall have a general 
secretary and one or more associate gen- 
eral secretaries as its work may show to 
be necessary. The commission shall be 



otherwise organized and operate accord- 
ing to the general provisions of the Ad- 
ministrative Order of the Discipline. 
except where they may be in conflict with 
the provisions herein adopted specifically 
for the commission. 

Funding: 

The standing commission shall be 
funded like other general agencies of the 
church (H 906). During its first quadren- 
nium (1997-2000) it shall receive fi-om the 
funds otherwise authorized for the use of 
the General Board of Church and Society 
that percentage that corresponds to the 
amount authorized for the use of the 
Board of Temperance dunng the last 
quadrennium (1956-60) that the former 
Boards of Temperance, World Peace, and 
Social and Economic Relations received in 
individual appropriations. It shall receive 
all property owned or controlled by the 
former Board of Temperance at the time 
of its merger in 1960 with the former 
Boards of World Peace and Social and Eco- 
nomic Relations. 

The commission shall be authorized to 
solicit and create special funds; to receive 
gifts and bequests; to hold properties and 
securities in trust; and to administer all 



these financial affairs in accordance with 
its own rules and the provisions of the 
Discipline. 

Annual Conference: 

Each annual conference shall establish 
a Commission on Alcohol and Drugs. The 
total membership of this commission shall 
be determined by each annual conference 
according to its own rules. Each member 
of the Standing General Commission on 
Alcohol and Drugs shall be an ex officio 
member, with vote, of the annual confer- 
ence where that member resides or has 
his or her annual conference membership. 
Clergy appointed beyond the local church 
may, if he or she chooses, be a member of 
the commission of the annual conference 
where he or she resides. 

Local Church: 

Each local church shall have a work area 
for alcohol and drugs. 



This legislation shall become effective 
90 days after General Conference has ad- 
journed. 



Special Appearance 



Randy Holbrook, 

master artisan in clay and porcelain, 

will be at the Cokesbury display 
Thursday and Friday, April 18 and 19 





c Randy Holbrook as he creates original pieces 
He will be happy to answer questions and talk 
with you about his work. 



Randy Holbrook is the owner of / Love You Gifts. He n 

special General Conference chalices and bread plates us 

Communion service. He lives in Red Bluff, Californi 



d m the opcninj; 



%^ Cokesbury 



\ 



VISIT THF COKESBURY DISPLAY 

DRiuK lull iRHt I vV(.:: i;vi 

.Sutis/uUiiiii (,i. 1. • 



mmm 




46 



April 17, 1996 



Proceedings of the 1996 General Conference 
of The United Methodist Church 



Tuesday Afternoon, 
April 16, 1996 

BISHOP RICHARD B.WILKE: 
Delegates arc asked to be in their 
seats at a quarter past three. Go forth 
in peace. The grace of our Lord and 
Savior, Jesus Christ. The compas- 
sionate love of God, the communion 
and fellowship of the Holy Spirit, be 
with you now and forever. Amen. 

BISHOP ROY I. SANO: By the 
grace of God, we are gathered here, 
and the 1996 General Conference of 
The United Methodist Church will 
come to order. 

The first item on the agenda is roll 
call. And there are a few items that we 
need to call to your attention. The 
agenda as we have it before any 
changes are made in our Rules of Or- 
der or Plan of Organization is found on 
page 88 of your Advance Edition. 
There is one item of business we wish 
to call to your attention on the roll call 
for the Council of Bishops. And I'm 
going to turn to the secretary of the 
council. Bishop Talbert, to note those 
items. Let us give Bishop Talbert 
your attention, please. 

BISHOP MELVIN G. TALBERT: 
Bishop Sano and members of the Gen- 
eral Conference, we note the pres- 
ence of the absence of all bishops, but 
there are two of our colleagues who 
are not here that I think is noteworthy 
for the record. The first is our brother 
bishop from Liberia, Bishop Arthur 
Kulah. There is a lot of trouble in 
Liberia, fighting between factions, 
and he has decided that he needs to be 
there with his people in the midst of 
these struggles. And so he is in his 
own house As far as we know he's 
safe. His choice is not to leave and to 
be there. And I think this General 
Conference would want to note that 
as we are here doing our business, 
one of our bishops is at home doing 



the work of peacemaking in behalf of 
us all. 

The second is Bishop Alfred 
Ndoricimpa. He has been in Nairobi in 
exile from his homeland of Burundi 
for quite a time now. But getting to 
the United States has become a seri- 
ous problem. Our State Department 
will not give him or grant him a visa. 
We have been writing to all of the 
departments, appealing our case, but 
they simply have not been willing to 
grant him a visa to be here with us. 
You need to know we are deeply dis- 
turbed by that. We plan to make a 
formal protest, but we wanted you to 
know that that's why our brother Al- 
fred Ndoricimpa is not here. He was 
planning to come, but he could not get 
a visa. Thank you. 

BISHOP SANO: Let us pause 
briefly for prayer. 

(prayer) 

We have a word of greetings from 
our marvelous host, so I turn to 
Bishop Swenson to bring greetings 
for us in this area. Bishop Swenson, 
please. 

Bishop Swenson Welcome 

BISHOP MARY ANN SWENSON: 
Welcome world to our neighborhood. 
Our neighborhood is vast and diverse. 
It is peaks and plains, mountains and 
metropolitan, sunshine and snow, de- 
sert, and continental divide. It is home 
to dinosaurs and aspen and petro- 
gl>'phs of persons in canyonlands who 
lived there and travelled this way and 
glorified their creator a long, long 
time ago. 

Our neighborhood is 460,000 
square miles of Montana, Utah, Wyo- 
ming, Colorado, and a little bit of 
Idaho. In Utah we have a vision that 
the desert shall bloom with grace. In 
Wyoming we have more antelope 
than people and more wind than you 



can imagine. In Montana it's big sky 
country; the last best place. And 
you're going to see a lot of Colorado 
this week and next. 

Our vast and diverse neighborhood 
is Tongan, Somoan, Korean, Japa- 
nese, Urdu, Blackfeet, Cheyenne, 
Arapaho, Crow, Ute, Hispanic, Afri- 
can-American, and cowboy and cow- 
girl. We are skiers, ranchers, farmers, 
teachers, and urban technocrats. And 
we are all learning. Wc are learning 
that we are all one family. We have 
been praying for you and with you in 
preparation for these days together. 

Welcome world to our neighbor- 
hood. And we've come to learn some- 
thing. In our preparation to welcome 
you as the world to our neighborhood, 
we have come to learn in fact that our 
neighborhood is the world. And as we 
have worked to create spaces of hos- 
pitality for stranger to become friend, 
we have come to know more and more 
we are one family, one people, related 
to one God, one holy apostolic catholic 
church, one world. 

Now we hope you'll take advantage 
of some of the mission opportunities 
while you are here. You know people 
arc coming from around the world to 
build a Habitat house during these 
two weeks. I got to be a part of the 
groundbreaking ceremony a little 
while ago, and see a big hole in the 
ground, and meet the family who will 
live there. Volunteers in mission are 
coming from all around the world. And 
it's going to be really interesting with 
all of the translators and see how 
many languages we can all learn how 
to say "hammer and nails." We will 
dedicate the house on Saturday after 
General Conference closes on Friday. 

I hope that while you're here you 
will visit some of the mission adven- 
tures of the local area. I hope you'll 
take a visit to Warren Village. This is 
one of the general church Advance 
Specials that is a close-knit commu- 
nity of low-income, single-parent 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No. 2 



families where they are working to 
grow and develop and become self 
sufficient. There are families with up 
to four children who live in the apart- 
ments at Warren Village while they 
are working and going to school and 
growing and learning. 

We will have a number of mini- 
tours available for you, a lot of special 
events next weekend, a lot of mission 
service opportunities. I hope you'll 
take time to see the Women's Bean 
Project and attend the play Caught in 
the Middle. 

As we gather for these two weeks 
to do the church's work, I hope that 
you will not forget to take time to look 
to the mountains. Let us be God's 
people celebrating God's creation. 
Let us celebrate God's creation with 
a dream that we will know ourselves, 
participating in God's mission to re- 
deem and restore all of creation to 
God's intended design. 

Welcome world; welcome to our 
neighborhood. 

BISHOP SANO: We'll tiim next to 
the report from the General Confer- 
ence Committee. 

Commtsston on General Conference 
Introduced 

JOHN J. THOMAS: Bishop Sano, 
members of the Council of Bishops, 
delegates, officials, and visitors. On 
behalf of the Commission on General 
Conference, we extend greetings and 
welcome to each of you. We welcome 
you to the conference which com- 
pletes the 20th Century and makes 
plans for the 21st. We especially wel- 
come those who are attending Gen- 
eral Conference for the first time as 
elected and reserve delegates. 

The commission is given responsi- 
bility for the determming of the time 
and place of the meeting of General 
Conference and makmg all arrange- 
ments for the sessions of General 
Conference. The names of the com- 
mission members are found on page 
6ve olWic Advance DCA. I have them 
here before you and I at this time wish 
to introduce to you the members that 
have been working so hard for the 



past four years along with the Denver 
area representatives to make this a 
successful General Conference. 

First of all I'd like to introduce, 
from Sierra Madre, Cahf., the vice 
chair for facilities of the commission, 
The Rev. Don Locher. You will with- 
hold your applause until I have intro- 
duced them all please. The vice 
chairperson for program from De- 
troit, Mich., The Rev. William Quick; 
the secretary of our commission, all 
the way from Valhermoso Springs, 
Ala., Mollie M. Stewart; from River 
Edge, N.J., Robert Brandt; from 
Memphis, Tenn., Dr. Jerry Brewster; 
from New Orleans, La., The Rev. 
Carol Cotton-Winn; from Rockford, 
111., The Rev. Sandra Hoke; from Dal- 
las, Texas, Thalia Matherson; from 
Walnut Creek, Calif., Harry Shaner; 
from Campbellsville, Ky., The Rev. 
Wallace Thomas. 

MR JOHN J. THOMAS (chairper- 
son of the Commission on General 
Conference) And from Rochester, 
Pennsylvania, the Rev. J. Howard 
Wright. In addition to which we have 
three ex-officio members. First of all, 
and I understand seated someplace 
out in front and not up here, is Sandra 
Kelly Lakore, the general secretary of 
the General Council on Finance and 
Administration. Would you, Sandra, 
please stand? She is way in the back. 
Also, Carolyn Marshall who is the sec- 
retary of General Conference, and she 
is from Petersburg, Indiana. Carolyn. 
And our executive director and busi- 
ness managerfrom Evanston, Illinois, 
as is Sandra Kelly Lakore, Roger F. 
Kruse. These are your commission 
members and my name is John 
Thomas and I come from Brazil, Indi- 
ana. 

Local Committee Introduced 

The names of the Denver area local 
committee are found on page six of 
the Advance DCA. You have already 
met the host area bishop, Bishop 
Mary Ann Swenson, the cowgirl who 
was out here a few moments ago, and 
I also wish to especially recognize, 
and these folks will be recognized 



later but especially recognize the fine 
work of Paula Johnson, who is the 
chairperson for the local committee 
for this conference. These persons 
have worked prayerfully and dili- 
gently to prepare for your arrival. 
We're very appreciative of the hospi- 
tality that they have shown and are 
showing as our local hosts and host- 
esses. 

This session of the General Confer- 
ence has been planned in accordance 
with the Plan of Organization of Gen- 
eral Conference. To facilitate the 
work of the conference, the commis- 
sion recommends the following 
schedule of special activities for your 
approval: the episcopal address at 
8: 15 this evening. This service will be 
preceded by a hymn sing at 7:45 this 
evening in this room. The laity ad- 
dress at 9 o'clock tomorrow morning. 
The Denver area program that was 
referred to by Bishop Swenson a few 
moments ago for Sunday evening, 
April 21, at 7 p.m. The presentation of 
the ecumenical representatives at 9 
a.m. on next Tuesday, a week from 
today, April 23. Bishop, I move these 
recommendations for approval. 

BISHOP ROY SANO: Okay, thank 
you. You have heard the motion. 
Those in favor will hft the hand. 
Thank you. Those opposed the same 
sign. It is adopted. Thank you very 
much. 

BISHOP SANO: The commission 
is also responsible for the seating as- 
signments which are determined by 
law. 

THOMAS: We recommend ap- 
proval of the plan that is printed on 
pages seven through nine of the Ad- 
vance DCA. We further recommend 
the commission be authorized to 
make any necessary adjustments in 
the seating assignments. I move the 
approval of the seating assignments. 

BISHOP SANO: Right. Those who 
will approval lift the hand. Thank you. 
Those opposed same sign. It's ap- 
proved. 

THOMAS: Sections of the hall have 
been designated for persons with 
handicapping conditions. Marshals 
and pages will be pleased to direct 



April 17, 1996 



persons to these areas during ses- 
sions of the conference. It is re- 
quested that there be no smoking in 
the center during the conference. 
Breakfast and lunch food services will 
be provided in the cafeteria in the 
halls on the main level of the confer- 
ence. No electronic communication 
devices are to be used in the plenary 
hall or in the legislative committee 
meeting places except by the General 
Conference or the convention center 
staff. 

Morning worship service is sched- 
uled in this hall at 8:30 a.m. daily ex- 
cept Sunday, and the choir will 
present a brief concert at 8:15 a.m. 
each of those days. We express our 
appreciation to the co-directors of 
music, Cynthia Wilson-Felder, from 
Atlanta, Georgia, and S.G. Kimbrough 
Jr. from New York. We thank them for 
their endeavors on these and other 
worship services. It was their respon- 
sibility to select the singing groups to 
participate in General Conference and 
in the worship services. It has not 
been an easy responsibility for them 
because they have had many selection 
audition tapes to be considered. I re- 
mind you that announcements are to 
be made in the DCA or magnification 
image projected notices are to be lim- 
ited to the official operation of the 
conference, its administrative and 
legislative committees. The commis- 
sion recommends that the journal be 
the official record of the General Con- 
ference. Bound copies will be avail- 
able for purchase as a package at a 
later date. I move approval of these 
recommendations. 

BISHOP SANO: Recommenda- 
tions before you, those who approve 
say "aye." Opposed "no." It is ap- 
proved. 

Two Offerings Announced 

THOMAS: The commission rec- 
ommends two offerings be received 
during the conference. The one just 
received will be designated by the 
Council of Bishops. Second, an offer- 
ing for marshals and pages will be 
received on Wednesday, April 24. I 



remind you that these persons are 
volunteers who provide their own 
travel expense and other expenses 
while here. They provide an invalu- 
able service to the conference dele- 
gates. In addition to these two 
offerings, you are reminded that this 
coming Sunday, April 21, is Native 
American Awareness Sunday 
throughout our denomination. If you 
were back home in your local church, 
you would be invited to make a con- 
tribution in the offering that will be 
taken. Since some of you have prob- 
ably not made arrangements before 
you came for that offering, we will 
announce, I believe on Saturday, how 
that may be accommodated here, so 
that an offering can be taken, not 
across the plenary session, but by any 
of you that wish to make a contribu- 
tion and be credited back in your local 
church for Native American Aware- 
ness Sunday. I move the recommen- 
dation that we have made concerning 
these offerings. 

BISHOP SANO: All right, I think 
that this vote needs to be a little more 
sacramental, and rather than a voice 
vote, ru call for a lifting of the hand. 
Those who will support this will lift 
the hand. Thank you. Any opposed? 
It's adopted. 

THOMAS: The executive director 
and business manager of our confer- 
ence is serving us anew this time. 
He's learning fast, by necessity. I'm 
speaking, of course, of Roger F. Kruse 
and I would request now permission 
ff-om Roger Kruse to make some an- 
nouncements concerning matters 
which pertain to the operation of this 
conference. If with your permission, 
I'll turn the floor temporarily over to 
him. 

BISHOP SANO: Yes. Welcome, 
Roger. 

Votit^ Procedure Explained 

ROGER F. KRUSE (executive sec- 
retary of the General Conference): 
Bishop and members of General Con- 
ference, I can't tell you how intimidat- 
ing it is to stand before you. It looks 
considerably different from up here 



than it does out there. Participants in 
the General Conference in 1988 of 
The United Methodist Church led the 
religious world in utilizing electronic 
voting at its General Conference in St. 
Louis. During that event a number of 
ecumenical leaders were present just 
as they will be next week, and noting 
the effectiveness of our voting system 
they too are now utihzing electronic 
voting during their major assemblies. 
Among these are such groups as The 
Presbyterian Church of the USA, The 
Church of the Nazarene, and The 
Evangelical Lutheran Church. Each 
has found this innovative method pro- 
vides both a speedier and more accu- 
rate tally of votes cast, and thereby 
enhances the movement of confer- 
ence business. In front of each of you, 
who are voting delegates, is the result 
of the latest research in the field of 
electronic voting. Utilizing the key 
pad in front of you, you will be able to 
record yourvotes instantly. When the 
presiding bishop states, "Please vote 
when the light appears," the green 
light on your key pad will light up. 
Also a message directing you to vote 
will appear in a small window on your 
key pad and on the large screen in the 
center of the stage. Next, press the 
button which corresponds to your 
choice. Press button one for yes, 
press button two for no, and if you 
choose to abstain, press button three. 

When you do this, your choice will 
appear in the window on your individ- 
ual key pad to confirm your selection. 
You may change your vote as long as 
the green light on your voting instru- 
ment is on by first pressing the star 
button in the lower left hand comer 
and then entering your new choice. 
When the green light on your key pad 
starts flashing, you will have three 
seconds left to vote. And when the 
light goes off, all voting will be closed. 
You will note that three seconds will 
come sooner and sooner and sooner 
as we move throughout the General 
Conference because you will become 
more and more famihar with voting 
and will be able to do it faster. The 
computer will then tally all votes cast 
and the results will be shown on the 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No. 2 



large video screen. Please remember 
that only one response will be taken 
from each key pad, so pushing the 
button ten times will not get you ten 
votes. 

Now we would like you to be able 
to become familiar with the system so 
we are going to present a few ques- 
tions for you to answer at this time. 
The first question may be the most 
difficult: Are you present? If yes, 
please press button one. If you are not 
here, press button two. And if you're 
not sure and you wish to abstain, sim- 
ply press button number three. The 
question is now before you. Please 
vote when the light appears. 



Apparently a majority of us are 
here, but some percentage aren't 
here, and there really are some of us 
who are not too sure. 

Let's look at question two. How did 
you get here? Respond by pressing 
your button: one, if you came by 
plane; two, if you came by pogo stick; 
three, if you came by car; four, if you 
came by bus; five, if you came by 
walking; and number six, if you really 
don't remember getting here. The 
question is before you; please vote 
when the light appears. 

Oaughter) 

I worry a little bit, but clearly the 
majority of us came by plane. When it 
comes and we experience the won- 
ders of Denver International Airport. 

When it comes time to take an elec- 
tronic ballot of those who are nomi- 
nated for certain offices, the 
procedures that we use will be the 
same. Assume for a moment that 
there is a contest for a new denomi- 
national mascot. As with the elections 
which will eventually be before us, we 
will use numbers for all candidates. So 
the numbers for our mascot in today's 
election are: number one for Bugs 
Bunny; number two for Kermit the 
Frog; number three for Mickey 
Mouse; number four for Bart Simp- 
son; number five for Pluto; and 



number six for Big Bird. The question 
is before you. Please vote when the 
light appears. 

(laughter) 

And so, to Judy Weidman and my 
colleagues at UMCom, it looks like 
you'll be working with Big Bird. And 
so ends the brief demonstration of our 
voting process. 

The Commission on the General 
Conference and the Committee on 
the Plan of Organization and Rules of 
Order remind you that each delegate 
has only one vote, and this vote is to 
be reported only on the key pad in 
front of the delegate. Absentee dele- 
gates may not have their votes re- 
corded by others except when a 
reserve delegate has been duly 
authorized to be seated in the place of 
a delegate. 

Since the beginning of the Com- 
munion service earlier this afternoon, 
you have had the opportunity to bene- 
fit from another marvel of the elec- 
tronic age. The IDA-Four Image 
Magnification System. The enhance- 
ment of visual images enables each of 
us to feel more closely involved in the 
presentations, the discussions, and 
the debates of the issues facing the 
church. 

In keeping with the changing times , 
the central focus of this plenary hall 
will be ever-changing. In some pre- 
vious general conferences, a static, 
unchanging backdrop or stage setting 
has served as the focus for our plenary 
sessions. In this session of General 
Conference, the video screen will be 
the center of attention. On the screen, 
a variety of images will greet you each 
time you enter the hall. 

In the morning, for instance, the 
portrayal may specifically relate to the 
sermon topic being presented during 
worship. As people enter in the after- 
noon or evening sessions, a portrait of 
the church at work in the world will 
be projected on the screen. And dur- 
ing the business session, the image 
magnification system will help all of 
us keep abreast of the discussion. 
When a specific item in the Daily 



Christian Advocate is under consid- 
eration, the page number will appear, 
as you can see illustrated at this time. 
You therefore will not only have the 
oral announcement of the topic being 
discussed, you will also have the vis- 
ual announcement, so that all will 
know the subject we are focusing our 
attention on at a particular moment. 

It was 16 years ago that a new sys- 
tem was utilized which helped ensure 
equal apphcation of time limits im- 
posed upon individual debate as well 
as committee reports. The timing de- 
vice has been proved so successful, it 
too is now used across other denomi- 
nations. The system we use is com- 
posed of green, yellow, and red lights 
which are set for the time allowed. 
Beginning with the morning plenary 
session, the timing device will be in- 
stalled in front of the table at which 
the presiding bishop is seated. The 
green light will come on when the 
speaker has two minutes remaining. 
The yellow light will be illuminated 
when one minute remains to close. 
When the red light comes on, your 
time is up, and the officer presiding 
will rap the gavel. 

Language Interpretation 

For the fourth time in the long his- 
tory of general conferences, we are 
providing simultaneous interpreta- 
tion by electronic means for those 
delegates and others requiring such 
services. Using wireless equipment, 
plenary sessions and worship serv- 
ices, as well as many legislative com- 
mittees, are being translated into 
eight languages other than English 
and broadcast to special receivers de- 
signed for use by individual delegates. 
Translations of the proceedings this 
year are in French, German, Portu- 
guese, Korean, Chinese, Russian and 
Swahili. This is the first time we are 
translating into Russian and Swahili, 
and we celebrate that reality, (ap- 
plause) 

ROGER F. KRUSE: Any delegate 
requiring translation equipment may 
check out a headset at the interpreta- 
tion booths, which are off to my right 



50 



April 17, 1996 



in the front of plenary hall. Please do 
not hesitate to use this service. For 
reserve delegates and visitors who 
need translation equipment, we have 
projected the sounds so that it will be 
more effective if you were seated off 
to my left in the seating on the floor 
during plenary sessions. For persons 
requiring sign language, a section in 
the hall off to my left, immediately 
outside the bar of the conference has 
been set aside for this purpose. 

To help delegates handle the volu- 
minous number of petitions, the com- 
mission has established and published 
a volume of the Daily Christian Advo- 
cate, which contains all the petitions 
from individuals, churches, and other 
United Methodist bodies. I know you 
will want to join me in saying thanks 
to Rich Peck and his staff for a job well 
done. (Applause). 

In addition, when you go to your 
individual legislative committee, 
awaiting you in the room will be a 
computer with all the petitions under 
consideration. Through this system 
you will be able to perfect each item 
right there, without any repetitive 
typing as has been required in past 
General Conferences. 

And, for the first time, we have a 
delegate computer center in room 
ClOl of the hall, where any delegate 
may go and check on the status of any 
individual piece of legislation that is 
before the body. Special thanks to 
John Brawn and his staff for their dili- 
gence in refining this system. 

Now I have one announcement that 
is of a very serious nature, because 
there are a large number of people in 
this hall. The commission is ex- 
tremely concerned that if for any rea- 
son there should be a necessity that 
we evacuate this building, that every- 
one understand clearly what the plan 
and the procedure is. There are emer- 
gency exits on all four sides of this 
hall. The evacuation plan recom- 
mended to us by hall officials is that 
those persons on the stage divide 
equally at the center aisle and proceed 
immediately to the exits on the far 
sides where they are seated. We rec- 
ommend that those persons in the 



floor sitting in this area proceed out 
the first set of doors marked exit; that 
all the persons on this side proceed 
out from the emergency exit here; 
that the persons seated in the rear of 
the hall in the bleachers proceed to 
the far corner to exit; that those per- 
sons seated in the risers in the back 
proceed off to their right, and that 
delegates either go immediately 
down the center aisle and out the 
sides if you're in sections A or D. 
There is a handicapped refuge area at 
each of the emergency exits. It is 
clearly marked on the two side exits; 
at the rear ot the hall: it is along the 
glassed area of the lobby 

It is our sincere hope that through 
the use of image magnification, elec- 
tronic loading, the automatic timing 
device, wireless interpretation, sign- 
ers, and the additional volume of the 
Daily Christian Advocate, that the ef- 
ficiency of this General Conference 
will be enhanced, and that it will be 
more meaningful to all participants. 

BISHOP SANO: All right. Thank 
you very much. Yes, John? 

JOHN J. THOMAS: The commis- 
sion wishes to thank the hard work 
that Roger Kruse, as our executive 
director/business manager, has done 
in fulfilUnghis responsibilities for this 
conference. Likewise, our commis- 
sion thanks the continuing hard work 
of our secretary, Carolyn Marshall. 
And I think that you would like to 
express your appreciation early on for 
all that they've been doing for the past 
four years. 

BISHOP SANO: Will the secretar- 
ial team stand? 

THOMAS: This morning members 
of the comm ission had the privilege of 
meeting with the overseas delegates, 
and to explain to them some of the 
parliamentary procedures and some 
of the issues that will be coming up 
before this session. We responded to 
questions, and we very much appreci- 
ate the response that we received 
from that meeting this morning. 



Reimbursement Expenses Explained 

Questions arise as to reimburse- 
ment of expenses in attending this 
conference by the delegates to the 
conference. The commission has es- 
tabhshed the per-diem amount of $88. 
Thaf s based in part upon our ability 
to pay as well as what we contemplate 
the average cost of a two-per-room 
motel stay and a reasonable cost for 
meals per day. That will not cover the 
cost, lam sure,forsomeofyou.Itmay 
be ample for some others. 

The delegates will receive two ex- 
pense reimbursement checks while 
you're here. The first one you will 
receive this Friday morning, and it 
will cover your travel expenses to and 
from General Conference. The sec- 
ond check will be for the $88-per- 
diem for the days you are here in 
Denver, attending this conference. 

The chairperson of each delegation 
should have discovered at his or her 
desk, as you have arrived, an enve- 
lope containing travel expense vouch- 
ers for all members of your particular 
delegation. If a reserve has been 
seated and is entitled to travel ex- 
pense reimbursement, give it to that 
person. We ask each of you to do some 
simple things. First, read the instruc- 
tions as you fill out your expense 
voucher. Second, I remind you that 
the instructions are on the back of the 
form. And then fill out the form the 
way the instructions tell you to do it. 
Give it to your chairperson. The 
chairperson will approve it and submit 
the full delegation's expense claims 
together to the treasurer's office, not 
one by one, but together as a group. 
We're prepared to process almost 
1,000 checks by the delegation, and 
if s very helpful if we get them all 
together. 

As to the travel expense, if you 
travel by car, it's 31 cents a mile for 
every mile you've travelled to and 
from, up to 1,000 miles. If it's over 
1,000 miles that you will have trav- 
elled , then you get either the lower of 
the cost of the miles above 1,000 or 
the cost of the least expensive air 
travel fare that you would have paid 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No. 2 



51 



had you come here by air. You may 
claim actual expenses for racals and 
lodging en route to and from this con- 
ference. Again, at $88 per-diera. 

If the chairpersons will hand in all 
expense claims forms to the treas- 
urer's office before business begins, 
and tomorrow evening, that's 
Wednesday evening session, we will 
get the checks to you on Friday. If we 
don't get them by Wednesday eve- 
ning, we don't know if you'll get them 
by that time or just for sure when. 
Now, presumably on Friday, you will 
all get expense checks. 

Let me now, tell you how to get the 
money for them if you need it before 
you leave. It's very simple. We made 
arrangements with the First Inter- 
state Bank located at the intersection 
of 17th and California Streets, about 
three blocks northwest on California 
Street from the front entrance to this 
convention center. We have estab- 
lished an account there. The checks 
will be drawn on that account. They 
should be cashed with no problems at 
all. 

If, in addition to the expense reim- 
bursement checks you receive, you 
want to cash personal checks, you 
may do so for up to $100 per check, 
provided you first go to the treas- 
urer's office which is located on the 
main floor, and I believe it's about 
A204 [A202] thereabouts. And have 
one of us there authorize at the bank 
to initial it for you. In effect, we are 
guaranteeing your check so that the 
bank does not have to get nervous 
with checks coming in from a variety 
of places around the world. Bishop, I 
ask for the approval of these recom- 
mendations concerning expense 
claims and method of claiming. 

BISHOP SANO: All nght, any 
questions' Those who will approve 
wiU lift the hand. Thank you. Those 
opposed, same sign. It's approved. 

THOMAS: Thank you. I've just 
been handed a note urgent for four 
people, saying that four cars are 
parked illegally around the conven- 
tion center. If not moved immedi- 
ately, they will be towed in. I'm not 
sure what illegal, what's illegal about 



it, but if you have some question about 
where your car is parked, you better 
check it, or you'll have a tow bill. 

All nght. The commission wishes 
to express its thanks and appreciation 
to Robert Lear and his staff at the 
United Methodist Communications 
for their coverage of General Confer- 
ence, to this Denver, and to the Den- 
ver local committee, for their work 
prior to and dunng this conference, 
and to Richard Peck at the Publishing 
House for the production and distri- 
bution of the DazVy Christian Advocate. 

2000 General Conference in Cleve- 
land, Ohio 

I also report to you that the com- 
mission has responded to an invita- 
tion from the Ohio East Conference, 
and has selected Cleveland, Ohio, as 
the site of the next General Confer- 
ence, [applause] 

I wonder where they're from. And 
that will be held on May second 
through the twelft:h in the year 2000. 
I wish to thank you for the privilege of 
having served here on this commis- 
sion. The membership of this com- 
mission serves for a penod of eight 
years, and were on staggered terms. 
Approximately half of us are going off 
this time, and four, and eight new ones 
will be coming on. We thank you very 
much for your understanding and 
your questions that you have coming 
up, come to the business office on the 
main floor at A206 or to the General 
Commission office at A210, should 
you have questions. One of the ques- 
tions that came up a httle while ago, 
and I believe it's been answered, 
some of the delegates on the first 
rows here couldn't see because of the 
lights. Are they better now that 
they've been dimmed? I understand 
they're not perfect yet, so we may 
have to do something else, put blind- 
ers on them or something. We tried 
to respond by dimming them, but at 
least we're aware of your concern. So 
again, we thank you. And Bishop, that 
now completes our report. 

BISHOP ROY SANO: Fine, thank 
you very much. I think you hear grati- 



tude expressed by the delegates for a 
quadrennial work. Thank you. It is 
clear we will not be finishing our order 
of business, the agenda, for this ses- 
sion, so let the chair test with the body 
if the body is ready to go until five 
o'clock rather than the scheduled 
closing time. Will you approve the 
extension of the time to five o'clock? 
Lift the hand please. Thank you. 
Those opposed same sign. We will 
extend our session until five. 

We turn now to a report from the 
Committee on Plan of Organization 
and Rules of Order. And, Bob 
Stevens, welcome. Good to see you 
here. 

Report from Committee on Plan of 
Organization 

BOB STEVENS: Thank you 
Bishop Sano, delegates, and friends of 
this General Conference. I'm here to- 
day presenting the report of the Com- 
mittee on Plan of Organization and 
Rules of Order which is found in the 
Advance DCA on pages 87-106. I'm 
one of those persons that didn't chair 
the committee. I didn't vice chair the 
committee, I got elected as secretary 
and now both the chair and the vice 
chair are unable to be at this General 
Conference. I am sort of filling in at 
the last minute and may not have 
quite as much detail as some of you 
would like, but we'll do our best. The 
Plan of Organization and Rules of Or- 
der of this conference are our working 
guidelines and processes. And though 
they sometimes seem rigid and regi- 
mented, the purpose of them is to 
facilitate our work together. We are 
going to try some new things this year 
that may be a new experience for 
some of you, and we hope that this will 
be a way of doing things in the future 
and there will be more attempts to do 
things a bit differently. 

One word about the committee it- 
self, all the members of the commit- 
tee, nine of the ten members for this 
quadrenniura were new on the com- 
mittee, never having served on this 
particular committee. However, 
Judge Jerry Bray irova Virginia has 



52 



April 17, 1996 



served on this committee previous 
times and many of you know that he 
has been a delegate to this General 
Conference for many years. And he is 
not able to be with us this year due to 
his health condition and we surely will 
miss Judge Bray, his words of wis- 
dom, and history. This year's report 
has two recommendations for action 
which I will be bringing shortly to you. 
But first let me highlight the changes 
we're recommending to the Plan of 
Organization and Rules of Order 
document itself and by the Discipline 
and the previous rules of the General 
Conference. These rules are adopted 
by the previous General Conference 
and are in place until these revised 
rules are adopted by this General 
Conference, at which time they be- 
come operative until the next General 
Conference. 

A few highlights of some of the 
changes we've made, and otherwise 
I'm assuming that you have had the 
privilege of reading our report and 
recommendations and we will cer- 
tainly entertain questions that may 
occur. First, we've reduced the 
number of legislative committees, 
and you've already experienced that 
from 11 to ten. We had 11 for two 
quadrennia, with a Faith and Order 
Committee, and feltthatthis quadren- 
nium that was not necessary. We have 
divided the special reports among the 
several appropriate legislative com- 
mittees. 

Committees on Agenda and Calendar 
Merged 

We are recommending a change 
that many of us have talked about for 
several years, several general confer- 
ences, to combine the historic Stand- 
ing Committee on Agenda and the 
historic Standing Committee on Cal- 
endar into one new committee on 
Agenda and Calendar. 

Now for some of you that are new 
and may wonder what the difference 
is, the Committee on Agenda has had 
the responsibility for planning the 
overall work day schedule and the 
Committee on Calendar would work 



with individual calendar items that 
were to come before the General 
Conference to be sure that we cov- 
ered everything in an expeditious 
fashion. We've discovered that the 
two committees needed to work to- 
gether so m uch that the efficiency was 
to combine them. 

When we assigned the functions of 
the two committees to the new one, 
we also continued that the member- 
ship restriction from the previous 
Committee on Calendar would be in- 
cluded in these rules. And that mem- 
bership restnction is in order to avoid 
an appearance of conflict of interest, 
that no member of a general agency, 
nor any general agency staff who hap- 
pens to be a delegate should serve on 
the Committee on Agenda and Calen- 
dar. The matter of combinmg these 
committees has been discussed pre- 
viously and, based on reports and rec- 
ommendations from both of the 1992 
committees, the need to combine 
seems appropriate. The two-commit- 
tee structure created duplicate ef- 
forts, and the work loads can well be 
accommodated. 

Another important stated change 
for the Commission on General Con- 
ference, and you heard some discus- 
sion about it from John Thomas, is 
we've included a directive provision 
now that all necessary measures be 
taken to assure full participation of 
delegates, including providing accom- 
modations for language and physical 
challenges. We have provided for the 
deletion of Discipline provisions 
which have been declared unconstitu- 
tional by the Judicial Council. Cur- 
rently it takes a specific General 
Conference action to delete such pro- 
visions, which seems unnecessary to 
the committee, and often frankly is 
not being done. It will help assure the 
accuracy of the current Discipline. 
Just as an example, for some of you 
that are interested in such technical 
details, there was paragraph 701. le in 
the '88 Discipline that has to do with 
the right of an annual conference to 
determine some of its clergy mem- 
bership. The Judicial Council declared 
it unconstitutional in 1989, but if you 



look in your 1992 Discipline, it's still 
there as paragraph 702. le. Well, it 
seems to us that that ought to be a 
matter of editing, but in order to make 
it clear to the secretary and the editor 
of the Discipline, we're providing this 
in our plan of organization. 

And finally, we've amended the 
rules and attempted to bring them in 
harmony with current practice and 
make it more clear. One of the issues 
that we dealt with, with the electronic 
voting, is how do we deal with not 
disenfranchising persons who are 
making presentations on the platform 
from having a right to vote. And in 
times prior, often there would be a 
reserve seated, and the persons on 
the platform would not vote. Well, 
with the electronic voting, we've Ined 
to address that now and we've created 
a new rule six which indicates that 
persons who are making presenta- 
tions on the platform will be able to 
vote from key pads on the platform. 
Roger tells me they're not here yet, 
but once you approve these rules, that 
they will be here at the necessary 
time. 

Minority Reports Procedure Clarified 

The use of the minority report or 
substitute motion which is the oppo- 
site of a main motion, has continued 
to be troublesome for delegates. 
We've added a clarification to rule 24a 
on page 103 that makes it clear that a 
substitute motion may not be a nega- 
tion of the main motion. In other 
words, you can't, if a main motion says 
to vote "yes", you can't make a sub- 
stitute motion to vote "no". You have 
to, your substitute motion has to 
cover a different approach or a differ- 
ent issue. And we've added that to 24a 
and rule 35 on page 105, which deals 
with a minority report, has also been 
amended to clarify that a minority re- 
port must conform to rule 24. So in the 
past we've had cases where a legisla- 
tive committee would vote "yes" on 
an issue and a group of people would 
get together and create a minority 
report that simply said "no" on the 
same issue. We're making it clear that 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No. 2 



that's not Robert's Rules of Order and 
that's not the rules of our General 
Conference. 

BOB STEVENS: The Consent Cal- 
endar is an important part of our proc- 
ess but is often difficult for delegates 
to follow legislative actions. Too 
often, important Discipline changes 
have been obscured by the many non- 
concurrence actions reported on the 
Consent Calendar. We've written the 
Consent Calendar provisions of Rule 
28 to make it easier to follow, and 
more importantly, that the Consent 
Calendar as printed in the Advocate 
will be divided into three separate 
sections: Z)isci/)/iMe-concurrence, 
non-Discipline concurrence, and all 
the non-concurrence items. Hope- 
fully this improvement will help the 
delegates identify changes more eas- 
ily. 

And finally, Rule 39 has been 
amended in order that the Plan of 
Organization and Rules of Order as 
adopted today will be printed in full in 
the revised format in tomorrow's 
Daily Advocate . We hope that a clean 
copy will be useful to the delegates. 

I'm going to stop at this point. 
Bishop, and bring a motion to approve 
the Plan of Organization and Rules of 
Order, as amended, that are printed in 
the DCA. And just to let you know 
where I'm going, following that. 
Bishop, I will bring a separate motion 
and some discussion regarding our 
recommendation number two. 
Bishop, I move the adoption of our 
report as printed on pages 88-106. 

BISHOP SANO: All right. Over 
here please. Microphone. Whaf s the 
closest microphone to you there? 
Seven. All right. Give us your name 
and conference, please. 

PHIL GRANGER (North Indiana): 
Bishop, is this the appropriate time to 
move an amendment to the rules? 

BISHOP SANO: Yes, it is. The pro- 
posals are before us. 

GRANGER: I move that the end of 
7D, found on page 94, column one, 
under the Committee on Reference, 
to add the following: 

BISHOP SANO: Locate that again, 
please. 



GRANGER: 7D, page 94. Ifs in 
column one. If s just before the begin- 
ning of the next section, B. 

BISHOP SANO: Oh yes, B. All 
right, thank you. 

GRANGER: And the amendment 
is: In accordance with paragraph 608 
of the Book of Discipline , all petitions 
submitted by unofficial organizations 
such as Affirmation, Good News, 
Methodist Federation for Social Ac- 
tion, and the Mission Society for 
United Methodists, be declared i- 
nvahd, and that they be withdrawn by 
the Committee on Reference and not 
be considered by any legislative com- 
mittee or plenary session, notwith- 
standing the fact that they may be 
printed in the Advance DCA Volume 
1 or 2. If I receive a second, I would 
like to speak to that. 

BISHOP SANO: Is there a second? 
There is. 

GRANGER: Bishop, paragraph 608 
states that any organization, ordained 
minister, or lay member of The 
United Methodist Church may peti- 
tion the General Conference. This has 
been histoncally interpreted to in- 
clude any official organization of The 
United Methodist Church. I believe 
that that is the correct interpretation, 
and therefore petitions submitted by 
unofficial or unrecognized organiza- 
tions should be declared invalid and 
not considered. 

BISHOP SANO: All right. Is there 
any further discussion on the matter? 
Do you have the motion? Good. 

Any speeches against? Yes. Over 
here, microphone seven. 

PHILIP WOGAMAN (Baltimore- 
Washington): The list of illustrations 
offered is sufficiently diverse that 
what I have to say cannot be con- 
strued in any particular direction. It 
does seem to me that if it is historic 
practice to recognize groups of United 
Methodists, each of those named or- 
ganizations IS made up of United 
Methodists. That to turn our backs 
now on the petitions that these groups 
have worked on, in some cases at 
great labor, would be a slap in their 
face and an insult to them as United 



Methodists. I hope we'll turn this 
down. 

BISHOP SANO: All right. Is ther« 
a speech for the amendment? Chair 
will call for a vote. Could we have the 
motion read again, please? Do we 
have the motion up here now at the 
secretary's desk? Could we have the 
mover read the motion again, please? 
Oh, we do have it here? All right. We'll 
have the secretary read the motion to 
amend. 

CAROLYN MARSHALL: I move 
that at the end of 7D, page 94, column 
one, under the Committee on Refer- 
ence, to add the following: In accord- 
ance with paragraph 608 of the Book 
of Discipline, all petitions submitted 
by unofficial organizations such as Af- 
firmation, Good News, Methodist 
Federation for Social Action, and Mis- 
sion Society for United Methodists be 
declared invalid and that they be with- 
drawn by the Committee on Refer- 
ence and not be considered by any 
legislative committee or plenary ses- 
sion, notwithstanding the fact that 
they may printed in the Advance Daily 
Christian Advocate Volumes 1 or 2. 

BISHOP SANO: All right. The 
chair has called for the question. Is 
this a point of order? Clarification? All 
right. Could you state your question, 
please? Microphone eight. Name and 
conference, and this is only a ques- 
tion, not a speech. Yes, microphone 
eight, please. 

SAM WYNN (North Carolina): 
Would you explain what "unofficial" 
means? 

BISHOP SANO: All right. Is there 
a response to that? Should we say - 
not inthe Discipline? (laughter) Is that 
going to be adequate? 

STEVENS: Well, we haven't cre- 
ated a very good list of unofficial 
groups. Maybe we have a better list of 
official groups, but I don't know how 
extensive that list might become. 

BISHOP SANO: All right. Chair 
will call for a vote now. This is a 
motion of amendment, of amendment 
by addition. And you've heard the mo- 
tion. Those in favor of the amendment 
will lift the hand. Oop. I'm sorry. Is the 
machine working now? All right, let's 



April 17, 1996 



test it. Let's see. One for yes, two for 
no, three for abstention. All right. You 
can vote when the light turns on. 

Thank you. It does not prevail. You 
have the recommendations from the 
committee before you. [The vote was: 
Yes, 268; No, 621; Abstained, 22. The 
motion was defeated.] Any further 
discussion? Yes, back there, micro- 
phone nine. 

GRAYSON ATHA (West-Ohio): 

BISHOP SANO: Atha from West- 
Ohio. 

ATHA: I do not have a motion. I do 
not have an amendment, but would 
like to make a motion for the commit- 
tee to take under advisement for the 
next General Conference. May I make 
that motion? 

BISHOP SANO: Let's have you 
wait until after we have acted on this 
recommendation. Yes, down here, 
microphone nine. Seven. Microphone 
seven, please. 

Discerning the Will of God 

SUSAN W. HASSINGER (Eastern 
Pennsylvania) I would like to offer an 
amendment to rule number 36 with 
the new numbering page 106 column 
one. I move that the following be 
added as item four under rule 36. 
Upon request by the presiding officer 
or a member of the body and upon 
vote by two-thirds of the voting mem- 
bers, a method of discernment may be 
used in order to facilitate listenmg to 
each other. 

This method would require that fol- 
lowing a speech or a motion or peti- 
tion and before the next speech 
against the motion, the speaker 
against the motion would paraphrase 
the content and feehngofthe previous 
speech, when the request by the pre- 
siding officer to the initial speaker to 
test that the original intent was heard. 
This pattern would then be followed 
for each of the two or three speeches 
for and against. Those who para- 
phrase should attempt to do so in one 
minute or less. And that time will not 
be included in the three-minute time 
limit. If there's a second I'd like to 
speak to it. 



BISHOP SANO: Is there a second? 
There is. 

HASSINGER: In terrible anticipa- 
tion of General Conference, I've been 
reflecting on some of the decision- 
making process that we use. While 
much of it has stood the church in 
good stead, I'm uncomfortable at 
times with the win-lose atmosphere 
that emerges in relation to critical 
subjects through the usual pro-con 
debate format. It seems to me that at 
times the church needs to step aside 
from secular modes of decision mak- 
ing and engage in careful listening to 
each other and to the Spint in our 
midst. At its best, the General Confer- 
ence is a body seeking to discern the 
will of God for the present and future 
of the United Methodist Church. Dis- 
cernment involves listening to the 
voice of God and seeking to hear the 
voice of God in the voices of each 
other. Often the conflict in our midst 
is a sign of the movement of God's 
spirit. It's not a win-lose matter. 

However, the pattern under which 
we operate by the nature of speeches 
for and against and win-lose voting, 
makes that discernment process diffi- 
cult. It comes more from a political 
legislative model than it does from the 
church and the church's practice of 
spiritual discernment. While the size 
of the General Conference and the 
quantity of items for discussion does 
not allow for the kind of discussion I 
propose on every item, there are cer- 
tain matters for which the body may 
wish to operate in a more discerning 
mode. 

My proposal allows for more than a 
majority, two-thirds, to make that 
designation for those matters that are 
of such a nature that a different proce- 
dure would be useful in seeking to 
understand where God's spirit is 
moving us. The model for my pro- 
posal has two sources. First and fore- 
most is the biblical model of hstening 
to each other carefully in the process 
of discernment. In Acts 15, for exam- 
ple, dare we call that gathering in Je- 
rusalem the first General 
Conference? The disciples gathered 
to discern how the Spirit was guiding 



the fledghng church in the matter of 
circumcision of Gentile converts to 
Christianity. That issue had the po- 
tential of splitting the church at an 
early stage. Where if closing doors to 
the expansion of the church into Gen- 
tile territory, I suspect that the atmos- 
phere was tense as they gathered and 
the speech may even have been 
somewhat heated. The NRSV uses 
the phrase "much debate" to describe 
the interaction. However, in verse 12 
we read the whole assembly kept si- 
lent and listened to Barnabas and 
Paul. The listening I sense here is not 
just a . . . 

BISHOP SANO: All right. If you 
could bring your point to the close, 
please. 

HASSINGER: Okay. I was using 
the biblical model. The other model 
that we might point to is the model of 
mediation and negotiation where each 
side tries to listen carefully to the 
other story, and out of that sense the 
endless of the other and what either 
compromise or collaboration might 
come from that. 

BISHOP SANO: Thank you, thank 
you. We're going to need to move on. 
All right. Is there discussion on the 
matter? It's before us, the amend- 
ment. Did I see a hand over here? 
Microphone seven. All right, any fur- 
ther discussion? 

ROBERT W. STEVENS: Bishop 
Sano. 

BISHOP SANO: Yes, please. 

STEVENS: The Committee on 
Plan of Organization Rule of Order 
has not had an opportunity to review 
this and this is a rather significant 
process that I think merits our careful 
consideration. Rule 39 provides for 
amending our rules upon reference to 
the committee and provides for the 
committee to report back to the next 
session of this General Conference. I 
don't know whether they can do that 
tonight, but I would like to encourage 
you to refer this to the new Commit- 
tee on Plan of Organization and Rule 
of Order and ask them to make a re- 
port back to you at their earliest con- 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No. 2 



BISHOP SANO: All right, the chair 

is going to nik that's a tantamount to 

a vote, a speech against. Is there a 

speech for the amendment? Yes. 

please, right down here. Microphone 

eight, I guess, yes. 

UZ ST. CLAIR (Peninsula Dela- 
ware): I speak in favor of this because 
when I hear the speech just ahead of 
me it sounds like you're postponing 
this four years. I think this kind of 
change in special circumstances we 
need right now in this particular con- 
ference. So, I urge that we consider 
this. 

BISHOP SANO: All right, is there, 
there is a call for the question? We 
need, yes, we need another speech 
opposed to the, yes, down here micro- 
phone three. Microphone two please, 
microphone two. 

BISHOP CARL SCHENCK (Mis- 
souri East): I would move the referral 
of the motion to the Committee on 
Organization and Rules of Order. 

BISHOP SANO: Is there a second? 
Any discussion on the matter. Those 
in favor, let's vote on the key pad. 
"Yes" for one, two for "No" and three 
to abstain. Vote when the light turns 
on. The motion is referred. [643 yes, 
263 no, 20 abstaining] Did I hear that 
you thought the report, the response 
could come back tomorrow? 

STEVENS; Bishop I don't know 
what the plan of meeting for that new 
committee is, but I think that they will 
organize and meet this evening. And 
it's possible that they could bring a 
report back at the next session. 

BISHOP SANO: All right, the re- 
port is before you, any further discus- 
sion? Yes down here on microphone, 
did you want to come forward, two or 
microphone seven, microphone 
seven please. 

CAROLYN JOHNSON (North Indi- 
ana): I'd like a point of clarification 
again on the section eight committees 
a standing administrative committees 
the proposal for the merge agenda and 
calendar committee. Specifically on 
column one page 92. The addition, "no 
member of the committee shall be a 
chairperson of a standing legislative 
committee or a director or staff per- 



son of any general agency." In the 
commission report there was men- 
tion of conflict of interest. If you could 
clarify that, then I may be prepared to 
make a motion. Thinking behind the 
conflict of interest. 

BISHOP SANO: Bob please. 

STEVENS: Yes. In the commit- 
tee's review of this, and I don't think 
the committee spent a lot of time on 
it, it's been the long-standing provi- 
sion in the calendar committee, be- 
cause that committee specifically 
controls calendar items that are com- 
ing to the floor. And if nothing else, 
the appearance didn't look right. And 
so I think the committee felt that it 
was important to maintain this ap- 
pearance of independent and non-par- 
tiality that it didn't look like a person 
that happened to have a particular in- 
terest in a board or agency, would 
have an inside track as to what was 
going to come before the General 
Conference and when. I realize, evi- 
dently, that some persons were nomi- 
nated to this new committee 
structure without that consideration 
having been made and for which I can 
only apologize. It was not the inten- 
tion of the committee to not have this 
be considered. 

JOHNSON: Bishop I would like to 
amend by deletion. My motion is to 
delete the word a "director" or a "di- 
rector." And if there's a second, I'd 
like to speak to it. 

BISHOP SANO: All right there is a 
second. 

JOHNSON: Yes I think the issue of 
the appearance is well and good, but 
the real issue is substance. And that 
becomes to the point that one is 
elected to the General Conference by 
one's annual conference. So therefore 
one is not elected by a general board 
or agency to forward the work of that 
general board or agency. The direc- 
tors are non-paid persons so there- 
fore there would not be a direct 
conflict of interest. Every delegate 
has the right to submit petitions. So 
under the train of thinking of the com- 
mission, any of the persons who 
would currently be on the agenda or 
calendar committee would therefore 



be trying to forward only the work of 
their annual conference. We know 
that people rise to a higher occasion 
than that. So I don't believe that the 
conflict of interest piece that has been 
brought forward is indeed accurate. 
And what it will do is to disenfranchise 
annual conferences for the degree of 
leadership to which they provide the 
general church. 

BISHOP SANO: All right, is there 
a speech against the motion of dele- 
tion of the phrase "or a director." 
There is none. Does the... call for the 
question. Bob, if the chair is prepared 
to call for the question. Did you wish 
to speak to the motion? Okay, clarifi- 
cation, microphone two, please. 
Name and conference. 

DONALD AVERY (Louisiana): I'm 
unclear. Was the motion just to delete 
"director" or was it to also include 
"director or staff person" of any gen- 
eral agency? 

BISHOP SANO: Just "director." 
"Or a director" is the phrase that's to 
be deleted if this motion is adopted. 

AVERY: I would like to offer a 
friendly amendment. 

BISHOP SANO: Let's hear it. 

AVERY: To delete everything and 
to just make it an in a standing legis- 
lative committee, period. And then 
delete from there on, because the per- 
sons who are staff persons, they are 
also representing annual conferences. 
And, if the maker of the motion would 
accept that, that's a friendly amend- 
ment. 

(Continued with the April 18th is- 
sue) 



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Daily Report 



Daily Christian Advocate 

THE GENERAL CONFERENCE OF THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 



Denver, Colorado 



Thursday, April 18, 1996 



Vol. 3 No. 3 



Day Two Features Laity Address, Ministry Report 



In keeping with the Episcopal Address admonition to 
"wrap our conferencing in the mantle of prayer," the 1996 
General Conference opened day two with worship, en- 
riched by the clear, young voices of the McCurdy School 
choir of Espanola, N.M., and the preaching of Northwest 
Texas-New Mexico Area Bishop Alfred L. Norris. 

"God is in the creating, building and sustaining busi- 
ness," he said. "We are not without hope. In prayer we 
are convinced of the reality of hope." He called partici- 
pants to a more disciplined prayer life, humility and open- 
ness to God's answers. 

The morning featured two major presentations. James 
W. "Jim" Lane, lay leader of the North Arkansas Confer- 
ence, drew from his 30 years' experience as a certified lay 
speaker and Christian educator for the Laity Address 

On the threshold of the 21st century, he said, laity and 
clergy urgently need to become partners in ministry: to 
chart new possibilities, "to convince the world of the 
reality of the gospel or leave it unconvinced." 

Like the Episcopal Address the night before, the Laity 
Address challenged the church to "thrust open the doors 
. . quit sitting around in meetings talking about what we 
ought to do, and get out and about, and be in mmistry." 

Clergy-laity partnership "means a place for service and 
ministry for everyone! A place where everyone is worthy 
and valued and has equal voice . . . sharing in mmistry and 
leadership between the pastor and local church laity." 

Mr. Lane called for local churches to become "full 
service mission stations . . . where everyone standing in 





Agenda 




Thursday, April 18 


8:15 a.m. 


Choral music 


8:30 a.m. 


Worship 


9:00 a-m. 


Call to Witness and Prayer 




Presiding Officers Committee 




Report 




Agenda Report 


10:45 a-m. 


Break 


11:00 a.m. 


Legislative Committees 


12:30 p.m. 


Lunch Recess 


2:30 p.m. 


Legislative Committees 


5:00 p.m. 


Dinner Recess 


7:30 p.m. 


Legislative Committees 



the need of prayer will find love, forgiveness, acceptance 
and haven." 

He also urged churches to become "saving stations," 
"empowering stations," "equipping and sending sta- 
tions" and "community outreach stations." 

"We are God's station keepers!" the address concluded. 
"Together, let us claim the vision and lift high the cross!" 

The second order of the day was the presentation of 
the bishops' "Study of the Ministry," a 3,000-word report 
fiUmg 136 pages of the DCA, including 280 petitions 
proposing changes to The Book of Discipline. 

Bishop Sharon Brown Christopher and Bishop David J. 
Lawson reminded delegates that the 1992 General Con- 
ference referred the study to the Council of Bishops, with 
a heritage of studies going back to the 1960s. Calling the 
report a "vision for ordained ministry," Bishop Lawson 
said it was adopted unanimously by the 67 active bishops 
in the United States, Africa, Europe and the Philippines. 
Bishop Christopher said the proposal was offered in the 
hope that delegates "will join us in the prayerful, open 
search for God's leadership in this critical matter." 
(continued on page 58) 



A Conference Moment 




Two conference participants respond to the bishops' call to "interces- 
sory prayer with confidence God will break in with energy, wisdom and 
enthusiasm." photo John Goodwin 



58 



Apnl 18, 1996 




Providing music for Wednesday's General Conference sessions was the choir from McCurdy School, 
paratory institution in Espanola, N.M. 



1 United Methodist college-pre- 
ptotoMikeDubcse 



Daily Christian Advocate 

Editorial Offices - Exhibit Hall A 

Denver Convention Center 

Sales and Subscriptions - DCA Booth 



Assodate Editor Sheila McGee 

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Roundup and Photo Editor Brad Motta 

News and Features Editor Barbara Dunlap-Berg 

News and Features Wnters Roger Burgess, Keith Pohl 

Computer Manager/Calendar Editor Mike Cunningham 

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Composition Editor for News and Features Richard Street 

Recorder/Tramer/Conversion Specialist Glenn Hinton 

Assistant Trainer Vem Denney 

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Audio Technicians Gilbert Elam. Steve Fleener, Walter Patton 

Coordinator of Verbatim Transcribers Angela Butler 

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(continued from front page) 



Delegates then gathered in randomly selected groups of 
25 to consider the report and its legislative proposals. A 
follow-up process combined reports from the groups into 
one document which was sent to the Legislative Commit- 
tee on Ordained Ministry. The next steps will come when 
that committee reports its actions on the legislative pro- 
posals on the conference floor, probably next week. 

In other actions Wednesday morning, delegates elected 
trustees to the board of John Street Church, New York 
City; approved nominations to the Interjurisdictional Com- 
mittee on the Episcopacy (pp. 80-81, DCA); and referred 
to the Judicial Council a request for a declaratory decision. 

Following the noon break, delegates hurried to their 
assigned legislative committees to consider more than 
3,000 petitions during the afternoon and long into the 
evening. The 15-hour days had begun! 



-Roger L. Burgess 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No.3 



Make Your Mark iui Time 

The Disciple Bible Study has 
involved more than 400,000 per- 
sons. For participants, Disciple 
has left a mark and guided them 
in their journey as disciples of 
Jesus Christ. During General 
Conference, Disciple graduates 
are invited to make their "mark" 
on the time hne, located in the 
Cokesbury Bookstore, indicat- 
ing when they began their jour- 
ney. Persons are asked to 
indicate when they completed 
Disciple 1 or Disciple 2, 



Can You Top This? 




Take Now, Read Later!!! 



Herman Will, who attended the 1939 Uniting Conference 
as a youth delegate, is back for his 16th general church 
conference session. His first experience as a General 
Conference delegate was in 1948. In all, he has attended 
14 General Conferences and the 1939 and 1970 Uniting 
Conferences. 



A little-known treasure, hidden in the convention cen- 
ter, is the literature room (C102-C104). Filled with re- 
sources from colleges, universities, boards, agencies, 
caucuses, mission groups and more, it is a great place to 
visit. Fill your tote bag with resources you can use when 
you return home. Choose from a wide variety of informa- 
tional brochures, buttons, position papers and media re- 
sources that reveal the diversity of The United Methodist 
Church. 



Process Used for the Ministry Study Report 



The Study of Ministry came before the General Con- 
ference using the following process: 

1. The Council of Bishops presented the Study of Min- 
istry to the General Conference in plenary Wednesday 
morning, April 17, as an order of the day. 

2. Following this presentation, the body of the General 
Conference was divided into 25 randomly selected non- 
Icgislative groups for reflection and dialogue on the study. 

3. Each reflection group met for 90 minutes, guided by 
a moderator bishop selected by the Council of Bishops. 

4. Resource persons were available near the reflection 
group meeting room to be called upon to answer questions 
and to provide information. 

5. Immediately upon adjournment of the reflection 
groups from 12:15 to 12:45 p.m., the recorder from each 
reflection group met with the compilers of the report to 
share the thinking of each group. 



6. From 12:45 to 1:45 p.m. an inclusive group of six 
compilers, one General Conference delegate from each 
jurisdiction and one from the Central Conference chosen 
by each College of Bishops, met to compile the thinking 
of the reflection groups and write a short report. This 
group of compilers was staffed by a person designated by 
the general secretary of United Methodist Communica- 
tions. 

7. Copies of the report were sent immediately upon the 
completion of its writing to the legislative committee to 
which it was assigned as it convened in its first session. 

8. The body then followed the legislative process in 
accordance with the Plan of Organization and Rules of 
Order adopted by the General Conference. 

This schedule replaces Recommendation No. 2, p. 106. 



60 



April 18, 1996 



Directions and Tickets and First Aid, Oh My! 



"Everything is going better every day." 

That's the good news from Paula Johnston, Local Host 
Committee chair "We're answering every type of ques- 
tion, from how do you get to the ballroom to how do you 
get tickets for the special events tours on Sunday " (Tick- 
ets are still available for the tours this Sunday, and reser- 
vations are requested Tickets are also available for 
Sunday night's Montana Logging and Ballet Co. concert.) 

Based in Room A-113, the Local Host Committee is also 
in charge of first aid (m the B section), name tags (of which 
there is a shortage) and mynad other items. 

Delegates and visitors who experienced a two-hour 
delay waiting for ground transportation at the airport 
received Ms. Johnston's sympathy. "We had never been 
able to find when people were coming in," she said. "Our 
transportation person called the hotels and figured out 



that we had 500 people in on Tuesday. Actually, over 700 
came m on Tuesday, with 500 coming in a 90-minute 
period" 

"We apologize," she added, "but we're humans like 
everyone else " 

Ms. Johnston was pleased with the display of memorial 
quilts honoring child victims of the Oklahoma City Fed- 
eral Building bombing a year ago. 

A resident of Longmont, Colo., about 45 minutes north 
of Denver, Ms. Johnston has a cadre of 500 volunteers to 
assist the committee. Each volunteer underwent a four- 
hour training session pnor to serving in the convention 
center area. 

— Erik Alsgaard 



Delegates Approve Changes 

In the late afternoon of Day One, General Conference 
delegates received and debated several procedural 




-?? BlesseA Be tUe Women: Be Counted! ??. 

Reflections on Reflection Groups 

With 17 of 25 reflection grouDS reoortine: 




changes recommended by the Committee on Plan of Or- 
ganization and Rules of Order (page 87ff) in the Advance 
DCA. 






Female 


Male 




Sab-group facilitators 


32 


33 


Among the changes: 

• combining the committees on Agenda and Calendar. 

• adding a new "method of discernment" to the 
traditional methods for consideration of selected key 
issues. (A proposal from the floor was referred to the 
new Committee on Plan of Organization and Rules of 
Order.) 

• removing wording that would prevent delegates who 
are directors of general agencies from serving on the 
new Agenda and Calendar Committee. (A provision 
exempting general agency staff was unchanged.) 

• applying new rules regarding delegate expenses to the 
General Conference of 2000 rather than 1992. 

In addition, the body approved (with changes) a small- 
group discussion process to follow the Council of Bishops' 
report on ministry. (The full procedure appears elsewhere 
in this edition of the Z)CA) 




Example of Intentional Inclusion: 

• Leadership setting the tone for a welcoming 
environment resulted in more equitable 
participation by both gender and race. 

ixamples of SuDtie Exclusion: 

• Not regulating the length of one's own speeches 

• Stepping on the end of another's sentence 

• Completing another's je-itence 

• Discounting another's idea verbally and non- 
verbally 

• Women waiting for permission to rpeak; men 
assuming permission to speak 

Observation: Dividing and sub-divicljng into 25 or 
more groups resulted in insufficient translation 
services. 

Information provided by the General Commission 
on the Status and Role of Women 








Corrections 

Add Bishop Richard C. Looney to the active bishops' list. 

Add Bishop W.T. Handy Jr. to the retired bishops' list. 

Victor Bonilla is a member of the Council of Bishops with voice but not vote. 

Petition 21025, p, 1484, Para 1024 change to Para 509.1. 
Petition 21549, p. 1492, Para 2625.1 change to Para 2626.1. 
In Petition 21549 change Coronada, CA, to Coronado, CA 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No.3 



Legislative Committee Recorders: 
the Unsung Behind the Scenes 



Essential to the flow of General Conference is the work 
of 20 legislative committee recorders. The action on each 
petition in all 11 committees is entered into the DCA 
computer system and prepared for next-day publication. 
Without these 20 volunteers, the process would be vul- 
nerable to unwelcomed errors and time delays. 

Prior to the 1992 General Conference, committee offi- 
cers signed off on handwritten calendar items, and the 
DCA staff typeset petitions for the next day. The late 
hours and heavy workload increased the possibility of 
errors, and the time-consuming process often caused 
pnnting delays. With the 1992 introduction of the Petition 
Electronic Tracking System (PETS), legislative commit- 
tee officers began to sign off on the actual petition as the 
recorder typed it. 

This is the second General Conference using PETS, 
and some of the recorders who worked in 1992 are back 
for a repeat performance. One of those persons is Mary 
Ann Haney who said, "Part of the reason these folks are 
wilhng to volunteer is the excitement of bemg involved in 
the legislative process in a church that has global dimen- 
sions." She added, "Few of us are likely to be delegates, 



Agenda and Calendar Nominees 

The decision to combine the Agenda Committee with 
the Calendar Committee has changed the nominees from 
the Council of Bishops. Those nominees are as follows. 

Committee on Agenda and Calendar 

1. North Central: Mary Good 

2. Northeastern: Sarah S. Miller 

3. South Central: W.E. Arnold 

4. Southeastern: /o/!M Norton 

5. Western: Phyllis Ferguson 

6. Central Conferences: Eke Halloway 

7. Coordinator of Calendar: Fitzgerald Reist 

8. Chair, Program Committee: William Quick 

Also, please correct the GCOM nominees from the 
bishops. That agency should include "newly elected 
bishop" — not Bill Lewis. 



but we can add our skills in the effort to build a better 
church." 

The recorders don't just volunteer their time and com- 
puter skills. Many travel long distances, paying their own 
expenses. Eight of the 20 hail from the Denver area. 

In addition to Ms. Haney of Nashville, Tenn., these 
rarely seen and generally unnoticed workers include: 
Carol Ball, Mesa, Ariz.; Betty Coleman, Atlanta; Nancy 
Drake, Silver Springs, Md.; Lynda Evans, Cheyenne, 
Wyo.; Joyce Gorman, Hatfield, Pa.; Laura Hughes, 
Montgomery, Ala.; Bob McClean, Mattoon, 111.; Linda 
Barnes Patzke, Wheatland, Wyo.; David Persons, Texas; 
Sandy Scaggs, Macon, Ga.; and Susan Usher, Shallote, 
N.C. 

Colorado-based recorders are Linda Downey, Lake- 
wood; Brian Faust, Denver; Kurt Gwartney, Denver; Ted 
Johnson, Arvada; Lora Payne, Pueblo; Clark Rose, Den- 
ver; Barbara Thome, Lafayette; and Marvin Vose, 
Greeley. 

—KetthPohl 



NowSigtiing 
in Autvgrapfi Area 



Brian Baukmght 
12:30 - 1:30 p.m. 
Body Building: Creating A Ministry Team Through 
Spiritual Gifts 

James Moore 
12:45 -1:15 p.m. 
on the Promises, Sitting on the Premises 



Dennis Campbell 

1:45 - 2:30 p.m. 

Who WUl Go for Us? 

Neal Fisher 

1:45 - 2:30 p.m. 

Truth & Tradition 

Will Willimon and Andy Langford 

1-2:30 p.m. 

A New Connection 



Autograph copies of The Jesus Prescription for a 
Healthy Life by Leonard Sweet are available at the 
Cokesbury display. 



62 



April 18, 1996 



Announcements 



The General Board of Church and Society will sponsor 
a brown-bag-luncheon briefing Thursday, April 18, 1-2 
p.m., Ballroom IV on "Enough is Enough: Churches and 
Communities Workmg Together to Stop Gamblmg." Pre- 
senter: Tom Grey. Learn how you can join this effort. 
Lunches are available for purchase in the convention 
center Please bnng you lunch prior to coming to the 
briefing. 

Buses for the "Encounter with Chnst in Latin Amenca 
and Caribbean Luncheon" will depart (4/18) at 12 and 
12:40 p.m. from the front of the Convention Center (12:30 
p.m. for bishops, in front of the Marriott). 

"Open the Doors" press conference will be held by the 
Reconciling Congregation Program at 12:30 p.m. today 
(4/18) at the entrance of the Convention Center. Testi- 
monies by persons who have been excluded from The 
United Methodist Church because of their sexual orien- 
tation and an unveiling of 9,600 Reconciling United Meth- 
odists will be held. 

The North American Section of the World Methodist 
Council will host a luncheon on Friday, April 19, 12:40 
p..m. - 2 p.m.. Executive Tower Inn — Symphony Ball- 
room, (3rd floor, 1405 Curtis St). Bishop L. Bevel Jones, 
president, presiding. A brief program will provide invited 
representatives from United Methodist, autonomous and 
affiliated. Concordat-related churches opportunity to 
meet. "Seat of Honor" recognition's will be presented. 

The General Boards of Global Ministries and Church 
and Society will sponsor an Africa Reconstruction and 
Development brown-bag-luncheon bnefing Friday, April 
19, 1-2 p.m., room A-201. Lunches are available for pur- 
chase in the convention center. Please bring your lunch 
prior to coming to the briefing. 

The Missouri East and Missouri West conferences 
luncheon will be held Friday, April 19, 12:15 p.m. at the 



Holiday Inn. Cost, $15. Reservations must be made by 8 
p.m. Thursday. Contact Rhymes Moncure, Cody Collier, 
or Diana Loomis at the Holiday Inn, 573-1450. 

Special Events Day Tours, Tour. The chuckwagon din- 
ner at the Flying W Ranch has been canceled from the 
tour. This is the dinner only. Nothing else changes with 
Tour D Those who paid additional for the dinner will 
receive a refund. Please check at the ticket booth, or on 
the tour itself, to make sure your home address is on file 
for the refund. We apologize for this mconvenience. All 
tour participants will return to Denver by 6 p.m. 

Sunday Tours. Tickets are still available to worship, eat 
lunch, and tour Colorado Spnngs, Ihff School of Theology, 
Cheyenne, or the Eastern Plains. Please purchase tickets 
at the Information Booth in Lobby A by noon today (4/18). 
If you have prepaid, please be sure to pick up tickets at 
the same booth. If you are visitinga Denver church, please 
give us you local address so you may be picked up at your 
hotel. "Mini tours" of local attractions are also available 
on weekdays. 

The Committee on Hispanic Ministries invites you to 

our Hospitality Center located in suite 1701 at the Hyatt 
Regency, Welton and 17th. Information on the National 
Hispanic Plan, Hispanic Ministries, and other related 
Hispanic initiatives is available. Every delegate who stops 
by will receive a special gift. Open Monday through Fri- 
day, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m., and Saturday, 7 a.m. - 8 a.m. in A-201 
of the Convention Center. 

Tyrone Gordon from the Kansas West Conference is 
scheduled to be released from the hospital in Wichita 
today (4/18). Prayers of this conference are requested. 

If you are disabled and need transportation to and from 
your hotel/convention center, please contact the Local 
Committee Room at 446-4217 or Room 113. 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No.3 



63 



PARTNERS IN MINISTRY 
A VISION FOR THE YEAR 2000 
1996 United Methodist General Conference Laity Address 



God spoke, through the Old Testament prophet Joel, 
these words- "I will pour out my Spint upon all flesh, and 
your sons and your daughters will prophesy, and your 
young shall see visions, and yourold shall dream dreams." 

On Jan. 1, 1996, we were exactly four years from the 
beginning of the year 2000. Much has already been 
written, and much more will be published about this grand 
event in the history of humankind. Those of us who are 
destmed to live through that occurrence will always re- 
member it as a major milestone of our lives. 

It occurs to me that in the final moment of truth on the 
night of Dec. 31, 1999, that the year 2000 will begm as 
every new year has: with just another tick of the clock of 
time. Everything will be different, and yet everything will 
be the same. There is nothing magical or mystical about 
one year ending and another beginning. When we awake 
on the mommg of Jan. 1, 2000, what will be different? 
What is there about that mormng that will be different 
from all other mornings? 

We are being drawn like a magnet toward this new 
century. Our imagination has been captured by all kinds 
of "what if questions about "what might be" in the year 
2000. One thing is sure: if we have not planned well for 
that event and put systems in place to engage the world 
in which we live, that day will be like all other days, just 
another beautiful dawning of another new day. People 
will live and die, people will laugh and cry, people will hurt, 
people will love and lift up, people will be full and they will 
be empty. Many of God's people will be forgotten and 
ignored by us and continue to exist on the margins of life. 

As United Methodist Christians, today it is our time to 
see the visions, to dream the dreams, and to prophesy, as 
God's Holy Spirit is now poured out upon us. As the story 
of Esther informs us in the Old Testament, God has surely 
brought us to this place for just such a time as this! 

What is God's vision for The United Methodist Church 
in the year 2000? Since our past, present and future are 
in God's hands, we are destined, as God's people, to move 
toward and enter the 21st century. Onward we go, alive 
with confidence and excitement, people full of hope and 
open to the wmds of God's Holy Spirit, as we are con- 
fronted with the changes and challenges of lovmg and 
caring for God's people. 

As that part of the body of Christ called United Meth- 
odists, our calling and task is always to be open to discov- 
ering new and effective ways of fulfilling our ministry 
under the guidance of God's Holy Spirit. 

Our focus must be Jesus Christ! John Wesley said 
"Offer them Christ!" Our ministry is to people. Our 
commitment is to make a difference in our neighborhood, 
in our community and in our world. We are God's am- 
bassadors and mimsters. The people of God are the 
church in the world. It is we who must convince the world 
of the reality of the gospel or leave it unconvinced. 



We must thrust open the doors of our churches, as we 
go out in ministry and service. We need to quit sitting 
around in meetings talking about what we ought to do, and 
get out and about, and be in ministry. If every church 
would declare a moratorium on meetings next year and 
send the people out, equipped and prepared to offer Christ 
to their world, what do you think would happen? United 
Methodists who are dispersed for mission and ministry 
onto the highways and byways of our global community, 
just think about it! Folks, it should be obvious by now to 
everyone that we can't, as Wesley said, "Offer them 
Christ" by sitting in the churches waiting for something 
to happen. 

Vision 2000 and similar programs have proven to be an 
effective way for local churches to vision their future and 
then live out that future in new and exciting ways. I have 
seen it at work in my own church, a church that was 
getting older and older, now attracting many young fami- 
lies with outstanding and exciting children's programs, 
and now with a state-licensed, after-school care program 
for latchkey children. At one time, our children's time 
during the morning worship service might have five chil- 
dren; now we have as many as 25 come forward for their 
special time in the worship service. I have seen Vision 
2000's vibrant witness in scores of other churches across 
my conference. If your area has not yet begun a Vision 
2000 program, let me strongly encourage you to be the 
one to stand up and tell your bishop and conference 
leadership that you want to be a leader in bringing Vision 
2000 to your area. 

We, the church, must be energized and set on fire by 
the Holy Spirit of God. You see, we Christians are in the 
fire business. The gospel song says, "It only takes a spark 
to get a fire going," but it takes all of us to keep the fire 
going! We gather as communities of the faithful in our 
churches for empowering, equipping and sending. We 
continue to kindle the fire. As one warms and is re-ener- 
gized by the fire, others bring new coals. Together we 
keep the flame aglow. 

God's people are bound in love and covenant by a golden 
strand that reaches back to God's people from the very 
beginning of time. 

Do we all look alike, think alike, understand and express 
God's love the same, hold the same, turn loose the same? 
Heavens no! Does that make any one of us any less, or 
any more, worthy of membership in this covenant com- 
munity of fire keepers? Certainly not! We all need each 
other. Each one of us needs his or her own place to stand 
in this great congregation, but we also need each other. 
As one warms by the fire, another brings fresh coals to 
keep the fire burning. 

Dr. Donald English, president of the World Methodist 
Council, closed the 1991 World Methodist Conference in 

(continued on page 64) 



April 18, 1996 



(continued from page 63) 

Singapore with this image: All of us are players in the 
symphony with which we praise God. We need each other 
to provide all the different visions and sounds that make 
the symphony beautiful, both to hear and to see. If we 
want to belong to a group that is only violins, we can only 
make one sound . If we want to only play our own violin, 
we don't need to be with anybody, and we will always be 
right. If we want to play the symphony in the orchestra 
of God, we all need each other. 

Imagine for just a moment that this great United Meth- 
odist Church of ours is one of the fine "tall sailing ships" 
with all of its sails billowmg m the wind. We have turned 
and trimmed those sails so that the wind — the wmd of 
God's Holy Spirit — is blowing at our backs and we are 
speeding across the water. Wait' There's troublesome 
times ahead; the water is getting choppy; the wmd is 
beginning to shift; the sails need retrimming, and there is 
a rocky shoal ahead. All of us, who are called United 
Methodists, have our hands on the wheel. Will it be 
shipwrecked or sailing on to ports of m inistry ? If you push 
and I pull, we are going to run our ship onto the rocks and 
just look longingly for the missed ports of ministry where 
God's people are? We must, all in one spirit, very quickly 
decide which way to turn this ship we call The United 
Methodist Church, to keep in on course. 

We desperately need to become partners in ministry. 
What does it mean to be "partners in ministry" in the 
21st-century church? It means a place for service and 
ministry for everyone! A place where everyone is worthy 
and valued and has equal voice. It is a partnership that 
places far more value on your ability to see through 
"kingdom eyes" than it does your certificates, diplomas 
and credentials. Being partners in ministry values the 
"warm heart" and the "passion for souls" that not only is 
our heritage as people called United Methodist, but gives 
us vision for our future. Partners in ministry is not just 
another program for us to consider. It is in fact a new way 
for folks in ministry to work together in our great church. 
It is an attitude, an ethos, something that permeates how 
we "do church." Out of the understanding of Partners in 
Ministry, a new model for leadership in the church is 
emerging. This new model calls for sharing in ministry 
and leadership between the pastor and local church laity. 
It is crucial for pastors and lay leadership to work in 
tandem as partners in ministry. This requires a deep 
level of trust, commitment and communication on both 
sides. How can this trust be developed and deepened? 
How can we foster more effective teams in ministry? Our 
vision IS that each congregation withm United Methodism 
will be equipped with the resources and skills to engage 
in a shared ministry for Chnst both within the church and 
throughout the world. This shared ministry is focused on 
the primary task of the church and yoked with that 
church's own unique shared vision. A new millennium is 
dawning, and many of us in The United Methodist Church 
are ready! God's word through Isaiah to us today is "I am 
about to do a new thing; now it springs forth, do you not 
perceive it?" The clarion call to be "partners in ministry" 
is valid and urgent. 



The call is urgent. The time is now! We can't wait on 
studies to be completed. We don't have time to schedule 
committee meetings. We can't have consultants come in. 
Folks, we don't even have enough time to have a caucus 
meeting or take a vote. The Spirit of the Lord is poured 
out upon us right now! It is our time! God has brought 
us to this place and time with purpose and intent! 

The calendar sheets come off, one by one. The clock 
ticks methodically, slowly, surely. The year 2000 looms 
before us on the horizon. God's people are given this time 
and this opportunity for imagination and vision. What 
shall we do? 

Let me list just a few of the possibilities for mission and 
mmistry as we stand on the threshold of the 21st century. 

Fu-st, our churches must become "full-service mission 
stations." Centers for spiritual renewal and personal 
commitment, Stations where the sweet, Holy Spuit of 
God has permeated and engaged a whole community of 
believers. Stations that are community centers of whole- 
ness and healing. Stations that serve as a welcoming 



We desperately need 

to become partners 

in ministry 

beacon to all God's children who are seekers of the Way. 
Stations where everyone "standing in the need of prayer" 
will find love, forgiveness, acceptance and haven. 

Second, we must become United Methodist "saving 
stations" where love abides, and all God's children can 
find salvation, heaUng, wholeness and safety. We shall 
offer Christ as Savior to God's people, to the community 
and to God's world. We shall be centers of fellowship 
where all people feel included, loved and valued: a place 
where everybody knows your name! We must create a 
myriad of programs of ministry and healing for young, old, 
men, women, boys, girls, married, single, senior citizens, 
persons with disabling conditions, all persons who are 
hurting — ALL God's children. 

Third, we need United Methodist Church "empowering 
stations" to offer vital and exciting opportunities for wor- 
ship and learning. We are people of the Book. It is 
absolutely essential that we know and understand our 
Book. "Disciple: Becoming Disciples Through Bible 
Study" should be a part of the yearly program in every 
parish. This is a United Methodist Bible study designed 
and written especially for United Methodist Christians. It 
is now 10 years old and growing each year. Let's use it! 

Let's take a really honest look at how we conduct our 
worship services. Do they communicate the good news 
gospel? Do they lift up the excitement and call of the 
Pentecostal fires of a church in mission and ministry? Do 
they offer Chnst? Do we lead persons to conversion and 
commitment? Do we have an opportunity for conversion 
and commitment at every service? Today worship must 
be exciting and vital. Worship must address our heartfelt 
and "gutfelt" needs with the integnty of Holy Scripture, 
(continued on page 65) 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No.3 



65 



(continued from page 64) 

We must feed others with God's manna and lead them 
to the well with the water that will quench their thirst 
forever We must meet the spintual needs of our people* 
Let us challenge each other to ministry and service as 
disciples of Jesus Chnst Let us "lift high the cross, the 
love of Christ proclaim!" 

Fourth, we must become "equipping and sending sta- 
tions" where we equip persons for ministry and send 
them out into the community and world for mission and 
mmistry. Equipping the saints for ministry is one of our 
most challenging tasks. Hands-on training for ministry 
and skill-building events are what we need for the 21st 
century Every church should have a part-time or full- 
time director of volunteers This person must be a dedi- 
cated church worker who has caught the vision and is 
willing to be equipped and sent and to equip and send 
others into mission and ministry in the church and in the 
community and world 

We must learn to hsten to all our people. Our best ideas 
for ministry come from those who live out their lives in 
the everyday world, who have seen the struggles and 
injustices. People who see ways out for those who are in 
need and who are hurting, We need to help these with 
vision, sometimes far beyond our own, to translate their 
ideas, hopes and dreams into ministry. 

And finally, our churches must become "community 
outreach stations." Stations that offer programs for 
youth groups, scouting groups, community agencies, re- 
covery groups and assistance for those with immediate 
survival needs. 



Committed to being peacemakers among individuals, 
families, communities and nations, we must serve as 
agents of change. 

As we bind up the wounds of God's people, we are 
compelled to help find ways to stop the causes of those 
wounds. 

Mission stations, saving stations, empowering stations, 
equipping and sending stations, community outreach sta- 
tions. 

The Spint of the Lord is upon us now! Jesus remmds 
us, in the Holy Scripture, that God has anointed each of 
us to bring good news to the poor. 

God has sent all of us to proclaim release to the captives , 
and recovery of sight to the bhnd, to let the oppressed go 
free, and to proclaim the year of God's favor. 

We are God's station keepers! We are partners in 
ministry. 

God's prophet, Habakkuk, stood at his watchpost; he 
stationed himself at the rampart and looked out, watching 
and listening for God's word in his day. Here was God's 
word for Habakkuk: Write the vision. Make it plam on 
tablets, so that a runner may read it, for there is still a 
vision for the appointed time! What kind of a new day will 
It be on Jan. 1, 2000? What will the dawning of a new 
millennium bring? 

We are given this time and this vision. Let us write it 
in big, bold letters and lift it high for all the world to see! 

Together let us claim the vision and lift high the cross! 

—James W. "Jim" Lane 









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66 



April 18, 1996 



Reports of the Legislative Committees 



Church and Society — (4/17/96) 

The committee organized into four subcommittees, 
each handling approximately 80 petitions: 

Human Sexuality A [homosexuality], Dale Weather- 
spoon, chair; Jeremy Vetter, sec); 

Human Sexuality B [abortion], (Beth Capen, chair; 
Chuck Hefley, sec); 

Human Community, (William Scott IE, chair; Mary 
Virginia Taylor, sec); 

Global/Peace Issues, (Claudia Bloem, chair; Rufus 
Campbell, sec). 

— Lee Ranck and Shanta M. Bryant 



Financial Administration — (4/17/96, 4:12 p.m.) 
The committee created the following subcommittees: 
Pensions, (Grady Knowles, chair; Mary Miller, vice 

chair; Mona Mae Waymire, sec); 
BudgeVGCFA, (Lee Sheaffer, chair; Phyllis Rodriguez, 

sec); 
Conference/Other, Geannie Trevino-Teddlie, chair; 

Helen Potter, sec); 
Asked for referral of petitions 20593, 20603, 20605, 

20774, 21482, 21569, 21630, 23071, back to the General 

Council on Finance and Administration (Z)G4 4/17. p.42). 
— Erik Alsgaard 

General and Judicial Administration — (4/17/96) 
The committee organized into four subcommittees: 
Constitution Questions and Site Selection Process, 

(Harriett J. Olson, chair); 
Missional Study Proposals, Special Days, and Advance, 

(Sam Wynn, chair); 
General Administration and GCOM Legislation, Con- 

nectional Issues Study and Global Nature of the Church, 

C. Rex Bevins, chair); 
Judicial Matters, (Alfred Johnson, chair). 
— Charlene Bailey and Tom Slack 



Global Ministries — (4/17/96) 

The committee organized into five subcommittees: 

Structure and Structural Related Resolutions, (Twick 
Morrison and Paul Dirdak, chairs); 

Rural and Urban Ministries Issues, (Marilyn Outslay, 
chair); 

Ethnic Ministnes, (Mary Silva, chair); 

Health Related Issues, (Bill Hines, chair): 

International Resolutions, (Skip Keels, chair). 

— Cheryl Edwards and Linda Bloom 

Independent Commissions — (4/17/96, 4:40 p.m.) 

The committee divided its work into five subcommit- 
tees: 

Religion and Race, (Grant J. Hagiya, chair); 

Archives and History, (Phylhs Butler, chair); 

COSROW, (Becky Haase, chair); 

Communications, (Kimberly Pace, chair); 



Christian Unity and Interreligious Concerns and 
COCU, (Patricia Toschak, chair). 
— Ann Whiting and Kristin Knudson Harris 



Local Church — (4/17/96, 3:45 p.m.) 

The committee organized itself into subcommittees by 
disciphnary paragraphs: 

Paragraph 100s dealing with the Local Church and 
Paragraph 201 - Paragraph 207, Qean Dowell, chair); 

Paragraph 208 - Paragraph 243, (Mary Brown Ohver, 
chair); 

Paragraph 244 - Paragraph 259, (James A. Hamish, 
chair); 

Paragraph 260 - Paragraph 270, (Terry Clark, chair); 

Paragraph 2525 - 2554, (Robert Rosas, chair). 

Note: The names of the committee's chair and the sec- 
retary were not italicized in the DCA for April 17. Both 
are clergy: Janice Riggle Huie, Southwest Texas, chair; 
Herchel S. Sheets, North Georgia, secretary. 
— Rayford Woodrick and Kathy Kruger Noble 



Ordained and Diaconal Ministry — (4/16/96) 

The committee adopted a motion to use the Ministry 
Study as the basis of its work. They also decided to break 
into 10 subcommittees (5-10 people) as follows: 

Foundations and General Ministry, (Renae Extrum- 
Femandez, chair); 

Candidacy and Probationary Period, (Sharon Rhodes- 
Wickett, chair); 

Full Connection — Deacon and Elder, (Larry Goodpas- 
tor, chair); 

Local Pastors, (Deborah Pritts, chair); 

Formation and Transition, (Lee-Wi Tan, chair); 

Oversight — Division of Ordained Ministry and Higher 
Education, Superintendency, Equitable Salary, (Bill 
Crouch, chair); 

Lay Ministry Steward, (Gerald Richardson, chair); 

Bishops, Superintendency, General Boards and Confer- 
ence Boards [petitions related to paragraphs 500s, 700s 
and 1500s, but not related to Ministry Study], (Ruth 
Daugherty, chair); 

Grievances, (Lawrence McCleskey, chair); 

Sexuality, Interim Pastors, GCCUIC, (Cecile Adams, 
chair). 

During the session, Bishops David Lawson and William 
Oden gave the committee a historical review and a syn- 
opsis of the study and responded to some of the issues 
raised in the reflection groups from the morning plenary. 
Those issues included: concerns about the proposed of- 
fice of Lay Ministry Steward which the respondents felt 
would undermine other lay offices and have the potential 
for divisiveness and inconsistency with the ministry of all 
Christians; relationship between deacons and elders; and 
legal issues raised by the structure proposed in the study. 
—Judy Smith and Linda Green 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No. 3 



Additional Petitions 



11509 

Petition Number: 21528-MN-509-D; 
UM Rural Fellowship 
Termination of Office — Bishop 
Amend 11509 

Termination of Office . — An elder who 
is serving as a bishop up to the time of 
retirement shall have the status of a re- 
tired bishop. An elder whose term of 
office expires prior to the time of com- 
pulsory retirement age shall retain 
the title of bishop, but other rights and 
privileges shall be suspended imtil the 
time of his/her retirement when para- 
graph 510 will apply: his/her time of 
office shall expire at the close of the 
jurisdictional conference at which 
his/her successor is elected, and 
he/she shall therefore be entitled to 
participate as a bishop in the conse- 
cration of his/her successor. 

4. Resignation .— a)A bishop may vol- 
untarily resign from the episcopacy 
for assignment as an active clergy 
member under appointment in an an- 
nual conference after eight years of 
episcopal service or at any quadren- 
nial interval following. Six months no- 
tice shall be given to the jurisdictional 
or central conference Committee on 
the Episcopacy so a successor may be 
elected. The bishop would re-enter 



the appointive process in the annual 
conference from which he/she was 
elected. 

b)A bishop may voluntarily resign . . . 
until a successor is elected and assigned. 

c) In both cases, tThe consecration 
papers of a bishop . . . 



11732 



Petition Number: 21513-MN-733.1- 
D; UM Rural Fellowship 
Board of Ordained Ministry - Associ- 
ate Member 

Add a new sentence after the first sen- 
tence of 11733.1: 

Each annual conference shall elect 
at least one ordained associate mem- 
ber, who shall have a vote except on 
matters prohibited by the Constitu- 
tion. 



11532 



Petition Number: 21545-MN-532-D; 

UM Rural Fellowship 

Community Context in Appointment 

Making 

Amend 11532: 



Criteria . — Appointments shall take 
into account the unique needs of a charge 
in a particular setting,the community 
context, and also the gifts. . . 

2. d)Community Context: the abil- 
ity of the pastor to relate effectively 
to his/her community setting, such as 
rural, town, urban, suburban, etc. 

d),e) Family situation: . . . 

3. Communitv Context.— The district 
superintendent may develop community 
profiles with the pastor and the Commit- 
tee on Pastor-Parish Relations. Sources of 
information for these profiles could in- 
clude: neighborhood surveys; local, state, 
and national census data; information from 
annual conference Committees on Parish 
and Community Development; and re- 
search data from the General Council on 
Ministries and other church agencies. 
Profiles may be reviewed annually and 
updated when appropriate to include: 

a) General demographic data and 
trends, including age/sex/racial-ethnic 
composition of the community. 

b) Economic trends, including the inci- 
dence of poverty. 

c) Projected community changes. 

d) Other sociological, economic, politi- 
cal, historical, and ecumenical aspects of 
the community surrounding the church. 



April 18, 1996 



Proceedings of the 1996 General Conference 
of The United Methodist Church 



Committee On Journal Report 



The Committee On Journal 
hereby certifies as accurate, with 
the following corrections, the pro- 
ceedings as printed in the Daily 
Christian Advocate for Tuesday, 
April 16, 1996. 

Daily Edition, page 4, column 1, 
Church and Society, Joseph Harris 
is clergy. 

Daily Edition, page 4, column 1, 
Local Church, Janice Riggle Huie is 
clergy. 

Daily Edition, page 24, column 2, 
Committee on Journal, William S. 
Reasner is clergy. 



Daily Editwn, page 26, column 2, 
Bishop Joseph Christian Humper 
(Sierra Leone) convened the Com- 
mittee On Journal in the absence of 
Bishop Arthur F. Kulah (Liberia). 

Daily Edition , page 54, column 3, 
HASSINGER speech should read 
"and out of that sense the interest 
of the other...." 

Daily Edition , page 55, column 1, 
Carl Schenck's speech should read 
"Bishop, Carl Schenk." 

Reported by William Reasner 

Committee On Journal 

(C13, seat 2) 



(Tuesday afternoon session continued 
from page 55) 

Membership Restrictions of Merged 
Agenda & Calendar Committee 

BISHOP SANO: Right. The 
amendment is before the, the pro- 
posed amendment is before the body. 
Is there a second to amend the 
amendment by addition of or deleting 
the rest of the sentence. Is there a 
second to that? There is a second. Any 
discussion on this amendment to the 
amendment? There is none? Okay. 
Those in favor of this amendment to 
the amendment. Yes, do you wish to 
speak to it? Microphone seven? Or 
microphone two. 

CAROLYN JOHNSON: A point of 
order. Bishop. The main motion that 
is before us, I believe is amended, and 
I beheve the commission has brought 
that to us as an amendment, and mine 
would have been an amendment to 
the amendment. So this second piece 
that has come forth, is that correct? 

BISHOP SANO: No. No. 

JOHNSON: The chair did say he 
would bring it as an amendment, that 
was not correct? 



BISHOP SANO: Yes. Right. Yes. 
The motion is in order. There was no 
request for any further speeches. 
Bob, did you wish to speak to the.... 

ROBERT STEVENS: I beheve I 
made a statement on behalf of the 
committee earlier. 

BISHOP SANO: All right. The 
Chair will call for a vote on this. The 
amendment to the amendment is 
what we have before us now, and that 
is to add, to delete in addition the 
phrase "or staff person of any general 
agency." All right. Those, and you'll 
vote when the light turns on. [Yes, 
313; No, 581; Abstained, 29] There is, 
okay, the amendment to the amend- 
ment is defeated. 

We have now the original amend- 
ment before us to delete the phrase 
"or a director." Any further discus- 
sion? There is none. The vote is on 
the amendment to delete the phrase 
"or a director." You will vote when 
the light turns on. [Yes, 536; No, 382; 
Abstained, 14] The amendment pre- 
vails. It is deleted. Any further discus- 
sion on the report? Back here, 
microphone seven. 

GARNETT M. WILDER (North 
Georgia): Pursuant to the fact that 



this has been delayed for the next 
committee, I propose this motion: I 
move that the Committee on Organi- 
zation be instructed to inform each 
person or group presenting a minority 
report as to the proper mode of ex- 
pression so as to assure that the pro- 
posal be presented in acceptable form. 
BISHOP SANO: Yes, as in the case 
of another proposal, we'll handle that 
after the report is acted on. All right. 
Over here, please, microphone two. Is 
that close enough for you? Is there a 
microphone? Okay. Microphone 
one. 

Delegate Expense Account 
Amendment 

SHIRLEY PARRIS (New York): 
On page 99 of the DCA, the new Rule 
E under 10, delegate expense ac- 
count, I would like to amend by addi- 
tion. I would like to have the following 
added: that this rule shall become ef- 
fective with the General Conference 
of the year 2000, and if I have a sec- 
ond, I would like to speak to it. 

BISHOP SANO: Is there a second? 
Is there a second? There is. Thank 
you. You may speak. 

PARRIS: There are some dele- 
gates who fall under the provision 
which is proposed for deletion, whose 
arrangements for attendance at this 
General Conference were made un- 
der that provision. To be subjected to 
the new ruling when we are locked 
into our original arrangements will 
mean financial hardship if not financial 
embarrassment. I applaud the reason 
and the need for the change, but I ask 
that you support my amendment be- 
cause it will support the change, but it 
will allow for a forewarning to both 
agencies and persons in that category 
for the year 2000. 

BISHOP SANO: All right. Is there 
a speech against the proposed amend- 
ment by addition? There is none. Did 
you wish to speak to it, Bob? 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No.3 



STEVENS: Only to say that this 
action was taken by the committee 
about two years ago, and we sincerely 
regret that that information was not 
passed on to the persons that were 
affected. Simply as a committee mem- 
ber, I guess I assumed that it had been 
done, and Shirley, I'm surely embar- 
rassed if that didn't get done. And I'm 
sony. 

BISHOP SANO: All right. The 
chair does not see any call for further 
discussion, so we will call for the vote. 
Vote when the Ught turns on. You've 
supported the amendment by addi- 
tion. [Yes, 684; No, 194; Abstained, 
21] Any further discussion on the re- 
port? Yes, please. Microphone seven. 

AUSTIN FREDERICK (South- 
west Texas): I would like to call the 
previous question to aU that is before 
us. 

BISHOP SANO: All right. All that 
is before... Is there a second to that? 
All right. Those who will support, do 
we take a vote by electronic too on 
this? Okay. You've heard a call for the 
question of all that is before us, let's 
remind ourselves that that is pages 87 
through 906, excuse me, 106 exclud- 
ing recommendation two. Is that cor- 
rect. Bob? 

STEVENS: That's correct. That is 
correct as amended. 

BISHOP SANO: All right, as 
amended. If you will call for the ques- 
tion; vote when the light turns on. 
[Results; yes, 889; no, 38; abstained, 
5] The question has been called for. 
Did you wish to make any further 
speeches? 

STEVENS: No, I beHeve the mat- 
ter is before you. I think we've an- 
swered most of the questions. 

BISHOP SANO: All right. We have 
called for a vote on the section mdi- 
cated. Vote when the hght turns on on 
the proposal from the committee, as 
amended. It has been approved. [Re- 
sults: yes, 897; no, 13; abstained, 12] 
We want to thank the committee for 
their work on this section . We do have 
another section before us. Recom- 
mendation two please. 

STEVENS: Yes, and just a final 
word about the first section. If you 



have concerns and issues that need to 
come to this committee, it would help 
us a great deal if you would create a 
written piece of communication to the 
committee and give it to Carolyn Mar- 
shall who is secretary of the General 
Conference. Then the committee will 
have your concerns to have before 
them. 

Now secondly, if you read our re- 
port that was on the first page of the 
DCA, started on the first page of the 
DCA, which would be page 87. You 
know, we talked about trying to do a 
new way of giving a broader base of 
participation and at least some dis- 
cussion time and discernment time 
and reflection time on perhaps one 
issue. The committee spent a major 
portion of its meeting about two 1/2 
years ago trying to devise such a plan. 
And out of that came the proposal that 
we give all of the delegates a chance 
to have some general discussion 
about a major issue that's before this 
General Conference. And the issue 
that was selected by the committee 
in consultation with a number of 
groups and persons, was a study of 
ministry. 

But more importantly, was the 
process. The process was to divide 
ourselves into groups, into a group of, 
25 groups of what, 40 people that 
would be, about, each, and they would 
have a convener or a guider who 
would assist them in discussing is- 
sues that they felt were important on 
the matter. A study It would not be a 
place where legislation would be de- 
veloped, it would not be a place where 
motions would be taken or enter- 
tained; it would not be a place where 
consensus would be pushed, but 
rather a place for you to have some 
time for discussion and understanding 
and clarification. Out of that came our 
recommendation number two which 
is on page 106, which was the commit- 
tee's effort to try to put together a 
plan that might enable this to happen. 
And, Bishop, I move adoption of rec- 
ommendation number two on page 
106 of the Advance DCA. 

BISHOP SANO: All nght, you have 
heard the motion from the committee. 



It's before us, so back here, micro- 
phone eight, please. 

Proposed Process for 
Study On Ministry 

JOHN W. THOMAS (South Indi- 
ana): As chairperson of and on behalf 
of the Commission for General Con- 
ference, I move the substitution for 
the item designated as recommenda- 
tion number two. For clarification, I 
ask the delegates to look at the green 
sheet that was originally passed out 
and is before each one of you on your 
desk. That is a recommendation. I will 
read it and there is a slight amend- 
ment in item six, the second line, 
which I will clarify when I get there. 
We propose the study on ministry 
come before the General Conference 
using the following process: 

Number one: The Council of Bish- 
ops will present the study of ministry 
to the General Conference in plenary 
on Wednesday morning, April 17, 
1996, as an order of the day. 

Number two: Following this pres- 
entation the body of the General Con- 
ference will be divided into 25 
randomly selected non-legislative 
groups for reflection and dialogue on 
the study. 

Number three: Each reflection 
group will be meet for 90 minutes 
guided by a moderator bishop se- 
lected by the Council of Bishops. 

Number four: Resource persons 
will be available near the room of the 
reflection group to be called upon by 
the reflection group to answer ques- 
tions and provide information. 

Number five: Immediately upon ad- 
journment of the reflection groups 
from 12:15 p.m. to 12:45 p.m. on April 
17, that's tomorrow, the recorder 
from each reflection group will meet 
with compilers of the report to share 
the thinking of each group. 

Number six: From 12:45 p.m. to 
1:45 p.m. an inclusive group of six 
compilers, one General Conference 
delegate from each jurisdiction, (right 
there is a slight amendment) and one 
from the central conferences. Again, 
and one from the central conferences, 



70 



April 18, 1996 



chosen by each College of Bishops, 
will meet to compile the thinking of 
the reflection groups and write a short 
report. This group of compilers will be 
staffed by a person designated by the 
general secretary of the United Meth- 
odist Communications. 

Number seven: The compiled re- 
port of the reflection groups will be 
printed in the Daily Christian Advo- 
cate for all General Conference dele- 
gates to read. Copies of the report will 
be sent immediately upon the comple- 
tion of its writing to the legislative 
committee to which it has been as- 
signed as it convenes in its first ses- 
sion. 

Number eight: At the time the min- 
istry study comes before the whole 
General Conference, in the plenary 
agenda, there will be a period of open 
discussion without the use of the par- 
liamentary procedure. 

Number nine: After this period of 
open discussion, the body will then 
follow the legislative process in ac- 
cordance with the Plan of Organiza- 
tion and Rules of Order adopted by the 
General Conference. 

BISHOP SANO: All right. This was 
a motion to amend by substitution the 
recommendation two printed on page 
106. This is commg from an individ- 
ual, correct? And, so, is there a sec- 
ond? Is there a second? There is. All 
right, did you wish to speak to it? 
microphone eight, please. 

THOMAS: We have run this by 
those that will be presenting the re- 
port and it is felt that this will be a 
slight amendment to what is on page 
106, which would be a better proce- 
dure. We have had no objections to 
this. 

BISHOP SANO: Let the chair clar- 
ify where we are in the process. 
There has been a motion to amend by 
substitution. What we will do next is 
to perfect the original which is on page 
106. If you wish to perfect it, we'll 
entertain any motions and discussion 
on that and then we will turn back to 
this sheet — the proposed amendment 
by substitution and perfect it. And 
then the chair will ask whether you 
will substitute this for the recommen- 



dations on page 106. If it prevails, then 
this will become the main motion be- 
fore us and at that point it now be- 
comes the original motion and at that 
point it is again open for discussion. 

I hope that will be clear enough so 
the chair now is going to direct the 
body attention to page 106 to see if 
there is any amendments on the origi- 
nal recommendation. Is there any? 
Yes, point of clarification? Micro- 
phone eight, please. 

BISHOP SANO: Microphone eight. 

LUCILLE VANZANT (Oklahoma 
Conference) 

VANZANT: Number eight, I would 
like to have clarified for me. 

BISHOP SANO: Oh, we are on, we 
are on the original at the moment. The 
original is before us to amend. Before 
we turn to this to perfect, we're try- 
ing, we're seeing, if there is any ques- 
tions on or any perfections we wish to 
offer. 

VANZANT: Will you get back to 
read this? 

BISHOP SANO: We certainly will, 
yes. Wave vigorously, and I'll take 
note. All right. Any amendments pro- 
posed for the original? There is none? 
We'll go back to, you might as well 
stay at the microphone. Let's have 
your questions for clarification. 

VANZANT: Or is it just harder for 
me to get to a microphone? On 
Number eight, where it says that 
there will be a period of open discus- 
sion without the use of parliamentary 
procedures, I've never been in a 
meeting where we didn't have to use 
some type of parliamentary proce- 
dure. Would you explain to me how 
we're going to take and finish up the 
business? 

BISHOP SANO: Do you wish to 
speak to that? 

ROBERT W. STEVENS: Bishop, I 
think the intent of this is that this 
would be for a period of organized and 
managed discussion with the bishops 
still being the presiding officer. But it 
means that there would be no mo- 
tions, amendments, or debate in the 
sense of that structure, alternate 
speeches, for and against. I, bishop, I 



am not going to be presiding, but I 
think that would be.... 

BISHOP SANO: Yes. Those of you 
who have yoar Robert's Rules of Order, 
if s on pages 533-534. And he de- 
scribed it quite accurately. There is, 
yes, microphone nine, please. 

THELMA L. JOHNSON (West 
Ohio): Yes, I have concern about, this 
is for the study on ministry, is this for 
a one time, just a one time, so it won't 
affect next year, if it happens next 
year, it would have to be requested 
again? 

BISHOP SANO: Do you want to 
speak to it? 

STEVENS: Bishop and members 
of the conference, I think from the 
perspective of the Committee on Plan 
of Organization and Rules of Order, 
they consider this an experimental 
effort, and I'm sure that the next com- 
mittee will evaluate the process and 
perfect it and respond to the next 
General Conference. It is not in- 
tended that this become set in con- 
crete forever within the rules. That's 
my understanding of what we're pro- 
posing. It might be at the next General 
Conference. Okay? 

BISHOP SANO: Okay, Don, here 
please. Microphone three. 

Amendments Proposed to 
Study of Ministry Process 

SHARON K. RHODES-WICKETT 
(California- Pacific): I move to amend 
the amendment with two different de- 
letions, bishop, and I, would you like 
to take those in two separate mo- 
tions? 

BISHOP SANO: Let's have both of 
them and make it connected. 

WICKETT: The first one is 
number seven. I move to delete the 
first sentence. I. ..I'm appreciative of 
the efforts for discernment and dia- 
logue and reflection, and I think that's 
helpful, and I think that's necessary. I 
am concerned about the impact that 
that may have upon the work of the 
legislative committee to have the re- 
sponsibility for perfecting this and 
working on this. And I'm going to 
make this motion so that it does not 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No.3 



come to the DCA, but rather it goes 
directly to the legislative committee 
and then the work of the committee is 
not measured against the reflection 
group reports, but if s rather in dia- 
logue with the study, you know, itself. 
That" s my first petition. 

BISHOP SANO: Let's hear, all 
right, let's hear, let's hear the second 
one. 

WICKETT: My second deletion is 
to delete all of number eight and the 
first part of number nine up to the 
comma, after this period of open dis- 
cussion, comma. So I'm in essence 
suggesting that we delete the open 
discussion on the floor of conference, 
but rather move it right along. 

BISHOP SANO: Yes, lefs treat 
them separately. One by one, you 
know where the mover is. ..wants to go 
with this. Let's go back to item 
number seven. You had an amend- 
ment proposed? Sharon, please? Item 
number seven, you want to clarify 
what your motion was on that? 

WICKETT: On number seven, my 
motion is to delete the first sentence 
which would have the effect of not 
having the printout in the DCA. 

BISHOP SANO: All right. Is there 
a second to that? There is a second. 
Did you wish to speak to it? All right, 
you did speak to it, thank you. All 
right is there any discussion? All 
right, I don't see any. The chair is 
going to call for a vote on amendment 
by deletion of the first sentence in 
point number seven. You will vote 
when the light turns on. It is deleted. 
[Results: yes, 571; no, 331; abstained, 
14] 

We are at the 5:00 hour; we had 
scheduled to adjourn. Do you wish to 
extend or do you wish to go to the 
assembly, your legislative commit- 
tees? Do we have a motion to extend 
the time just to complete these three? 
All right. It has been moved. There is 
a second. All right. Those who will, 
you will vote when the light comes on. 
You are extending the time only 
through the two additional motions. 
All right; we have extended the time. 
Could we have the second amend- 
ment, please? 



WICKETT: The second amend- 
ment was to delete all of number 
eight. 

BISHOP SANO: All right. 

WICKETT: Then, just the first 
phrase of number nine, which reads 
"after this period of open discussion, 
comma," to delete that. 

BISHOP SANO: Okay, let's see if 
we can handle both of them at once. Is 
there a second on that? There is a 
second. All right. Those, the motion 
to amend by deletion of eight and the 
first phrase of nine up through the 
comma. Vote when the light turns on. 
It has been deleted. [Results: yes, 
621; no, 295; abstained, 13] 

The 5:00 time has come; we're 
ready for the legislative committees. 
Let's have the secretary instruct us 
on what.... Are you ready then for the 
whole report? All right. Let's vote on 
the, let's see we're at the point of 
amending this, so it will, we'll go 
through the steps. Those who will, 
make the amendment the main mo- 
tion. That's going to be the first step. 
Those who will vote to make this the 
main motion now, to substitute for 
the original. Vote when the light 
comes on. It is the main motion be- 
fore us. Any further discussion? Did 
the mover, original movers wish to 
speak to it? There is none, no re- 
quests? Let's now vote. This is the 
main motion before us as amended. 
All right. Okay, vote when the light 
turns on. All nght; it's adopted as 
amended. [Results: yes, 860; no, 78; 
abstained, 3] 

UNIDENTIFIED SPEAKER 

(male): Thank you very much. 
Bishop Sano. 

BISHOP SANO: Thank you. The 
secretary has two elections to bring 
before us and then announcements. 
Carolyn, please. 

Elections of Coordinator on 

Calendar and Committee On 

Plan of Organization 

CAROLYN MARSHALL (secre- 
tary of General Conference): Two 
elections which need to be done at 
this time. One for the Coordinator on 



Calendar to which Fitzgerald Greist is 
nominated. And the second one for 
the Committee on Plan of Organiza- 
tion and Rules of Order. These per- 
sons have been placed in nomination: 
Emery Percell, Jerome Del Pino, 
Bette Trurable, Darlene Amon, 
Robert Stevens, Momoh Kpaan, 
David Tanoko, Michael Pointer, 
Charles Brockwell and Marcus Mat- 
thews. 

BISHOP SANO: All right; the 
nominations are before you. All right; 
those who will approve, you will vote 
when the light is on. All right; they're 
elected. [Results: yes, 835; no, 15; 
abstained, 24] The announcements, 
please. 

MARSHALL: An announcement 
for that newly elected Committee on 
Plan of Organization and Rules of Or- 
der, that committee will meet in room 
A208. A208, 30 minutes following the 
adjournment of the evening session. 
In addition to that as far as time is 
concerned, inasmuch as we have ex- 
tended the time now, we will begin 
the legislative organization of legisla- 
tive committees at 5:30. 

Please go directly to those legisla- 
tive committees for the purpose of 
organization. Those persons who are 
elected to positions of leadership as 
chairperson, vice chairperson and 
secretary have a meeting scheduled 
at 6:00. We will change the time for 
that to 6:30. And advance the time for 
beginning the evening plenary this 
evening half an hour. The chairperson 
of the committee on presiding officers 
needs to bring a report to bishop. 

BISHOP SANO: All right; we are 
adjourned for the legislative commit- 
tees. I'm sorry, yes. Presiding offi- 
cers? Yes, if you'll hold just a moment, 
please. 

REX BEVINS (Nebraska): Chair of 
the presiding officers committee. The 
presiding officer for this evening's 
session will be Bishop Rucdiger Mi- 
nor, Bishop of the Commonwealth of 
Independent States. And the presid- 
ing officer for tomorrow raoniing, 
Wednesday April 17th, will be Bishop 
Lloyd Knox of the Atlanta Area. 



April 18, 1996 



BISHOP SANO: Thank you. Let the 
chair test with a body on the proposed 
schedule. To postpone the beginning 
of the hymn singing by half an hour. 
That has been the proposal coming 
from the secretar\'. Let's have a vote 
on that by the body. If you could take 
your places, please . You heard the pro- 
posal to postpone ccuvening of the 
session this evening to 7:45, the hymn 
singing. All right, to postpone by half 
an hour. All right, vote when the light 
turns on. It's adopted; we're adjourned 
now for our legislative committee. 

Evening Session 
April 16, 1996 

Bishop Ruediger Minor, presiding 
(song) 

BISHOP RUEDIGER MINOR: 
Every quadrennium, there is a certain 
very important process happening in 
the Council of Bishops. And although 
it's happening every quadrennium, 
it's not routine. What happens for a 
time of over two years that the Coun- 
cil of Bishops IS preparing its message 
to the church, to the General Confer- 
ence, delivered by one of its mem- 
bers. And it's not just that a person is 
elected to give the Episcopal Address. 
In conversation, m hstening and talk- 
ing, praying, and deliberating, this 
message is developed. So although 
one of us is speaking to you, she is 
speaking for the bishops. This quad- 
rennium. Bishop Judith Craig, bishop 
of the West Ohio Conference, will be 
the mouth of the bishops. And I pre- 
sent to you Bishop Judith Craig. 



Page 16, April 17. 1996 
(applause) 

BISHOP RUEDIGER MINOR: 
Bishop Craig, the General Conference 
has expressed its gratefulness and we 
give thanks to God for the blessing that 
you have been to us and what you have 
given us for these days. And now I turn 



to the secretary of the General Con- 
ference for announcements. 

CAROLW \Ly^SHALL: There are 
several announcements that seem to 
have come to us at this time. The first 
one is a reminder to those persons who 
were elected to the leadership for vari- 
ous legislative committees. The rooms 
to which you are assigned or the time 
that you are to be leavmg this General 
Conference will be open this evening 
for your use until 11 o'clock. And to also 
remind you again that the petitions for 
each of the legislative committees are 
available immediately after we adjourn 
here in room C204. 

The Plan of Organization and Rules 
of Order will meet within 30 minutes 
at 10:35 in room A208 for the purpose 
of organization and to begin work im- 
mediately on two referrals which are 
already done. 

Several notes have arrived at the 
podium during the course of this day. 
Of first reserves with queries about 
receiving the DCAs that are placed on 
the desks of the delegates, and were 
wondering where theirs are available. 
A word to you that those are available 
for first reserve delegates at the DCA 
office. 

One announcement came here 
which in reality is a deviation from our 
rules. Inasmuch as there was not op- 
portunity to make contact during this 
evening for the person who originated 
this announcement. It is being brought 
to your attention along with calhng 
attention to the rules which i will do 
after reading the announcements. 

The Inter Ethnic Strategic De- 
velopment Group will meet 30 min- 
utes after the Episcopal Address in 
Ballroom Four. And then to refer 
you to page four in the Advance 
DCA let me simply read it to you — , 
you do not need to find it right 
now — which says, announcements 
shall be made through the Daily 
Christian Advocate. Oral or pro- 
jected announcements shall be re- 
stricted to the official operation of 
the General Conference and its leg- 
islative and administrative commit- 
tees. Following this evening's 



adjournmentwewillcertainlyadhere 
tothat. 

And the last announcement is to 
remind the delegates that a resource 
document is made available. This 
document is offered so that all of us 
will be prepared to participate in the 
discussions tomorrow. You are in- 
vited to review this material printed 
on the yellow paper, which you re- 
ceived today, before tomorrow morn- 
ing's session. Bishop Minor that 
completes the announcements. 

BISHOP MINOR: Thank you . It has 
been a long day. The work will con- 
tinue and this is just the beginning, 
[laughter] I ask Bishop James Thomas 
to dismiss us with the benediction. 

BISHOP JAMES THOMAS (re- 
tired): [benediction] 

Morning Session 
April 17, 1996 

Bishop Lloyd Knox, presiding 
(applause) 

BISHOP LLOYD KNOX: Let us 
come to order. Our first order of the 
day is the address of the laity. And 
James Lane will be introduced by Paul 
Enin who is the president of the Na- 
tional Association of Lay Leaders. So 
if Paul Ervin will come now and pre- 
sent Mr. Lane. 

PAUL ERVIN: Thank you, Bishop. 
The laity address at General Confer- 
ence is fairly recent. The first laity 
address was delivered in 1980, so this 
will be our fifth laity address. The 
selection process has been overseen 
by the National Association of Annual 
Conference Lay Leaders. 

The national association operates 
much as the Council of Bishops oper- 
ates with the Episcopal Address. 
There are some differences. One, it's 
shorter. Second, the address is firura 
the lay perspective. It gives a mes- 
sage of hope and dreams for our 
church from the lay perspective. 

The selection process has been 
varied. There have been consensus 
reports, addresses by the laity. There 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No.3 



73 



has been a churchwide competition in 
years past. This year the selection 
was from among the active confer- 
ence lay leaders for the person giving 
the address. But m order to focus 
upon the message rather than the 
messenger, the judging was done by 
five independent judges, in the blind. 
They did not know who had written 
the particular paper that was pre- 
sented by the conference lay leader. 
The winner of the written competi- 
tion presented his paper to the na- 
tional association at their annual 
meeting and received comments for 
his consideration. 

Our presenter this morning is Jim 
Lane. Jim is the conference lay leader 
from North Arkansas. Tomorrow 
morning at the national association 
lay leaders breakfast, he will become 
the president of the National Associa- 
tion of Annual Conference Lay Lead- 
ers. Jim has been active in his local 
church and in his conference. He has 
written lay speaking materials for the 
General Board of Discipleship. He 
represents the hope for future of lay 
ministry. The theme for his address 
this moniing will be "Partners in 
Ministry." As Jim gives the laity ad- 
dress, he will be representing all of 
the laity of our church. Please wel- 
come Jim Lane. 

Lay Address — page 63 

(applause) 

BISHOP KNOX: Thank you very 
much, Jim, for that inspiring mes- 
sage. All nght, I sec a card back. If you 
will come to microphone 12 or eight. 
Well, 12 is right there. Microphone 
12, please. 

V.L. DAUGHTERY, JR. (South 
Georgia): In light of the episcopal ad- 
dress and the laity address, I would 
like to offer this motion. I quote, "The 
19% General Conference directs the 
Committee on Reference, requests 
the legislative committees and directs 
the committee on Agenda and Calen- 
dar to give pnonty in all sessions and 
actions to petitions relating to spiri- 
tual and numerical church member- 



ship growth, church membership de- 
cline, recommendations relating to 
evangelism, missions, and programs 
of service and servant ministries by 
giving such petitions prority status as 
calendar items to be acted upon by the 
1996 General Conference." If I can 
have a second, I wish to speak to the 
motion. 

BISHOP KNOX: Is there a second? 

UNIDENTIFIED SPEAKER: I 
second it. 

DAUGHTERY: I wish to quote 
from one of my seminary professors, 
a bishop of the church and at one time 
my own bishop. "History shows us 
that the church is weakest and most 
ineffective when she spends her time 
considenngherselfandherown inter- 
nal problems. 

The business of the church, al- 
ways and invaribly, should be her 
mission to the world. When she be- 
comes concerned with her own life 
and fortune, she loses it. Only as the 
church is engaged in work for the 
salvation of the world does the 
church find herself and become in 
truth and deed the church of Jesus 
Chnst against which the gates of 
hell can not prevail." Already in the 
petitions of this General Conference 
are the forms and functions to carry 
out this motion. We simply need to 
receive them early in the session 
and not wait until the waning days to 
be concenied about mission, minis- 
try, membership decline, member- 
ship growth, and servanthood 
ministries. Thank you. 

BISHOP KNOX: All nght. V.L., I 
am going to ask you to withdraw the 
motion until a later lime. I erred in 
recognizing you because we do have 
an order of the day. So, is that All right 
with you? Will you accept? Okay, 
thank you. Wc do have, we will be 
hearing, there is an election, and we 
need to do some electing, so if you 
have your Advanced DCA available 
please turn to pages 80 and 81 or in 
the regular DCA of yesterday, page 
31. And we will ask our conference 
secretary, Carolyn Marshall, to lead 
us in this. 



Nominations for Interjurisdictional 
Committee On Episcopacy 

CAROLYN MARSHALL: On the 
pages which Bishop Knox has an- 
nounced are listed the nominations 
which have come from the various 
annual conferences for the inter- 
jurisdictional committee on episco- 
pacy. That is the item which is 
before us. 

BISHOP KNOX: Do you have 
that? Have you found your pages? 
These are before you. If you will 
vote, if you will approve the nomina- 
tions, you will vote "yes" on your 
machine. If you will not approve, 
vote "no", and if you don't know, you 
vote "abstain." Please vote when 
the light appears. And they are 
elected. [Results: yes, 795; no, 20; 
abstained, 39] Thank you very 
much. Now we have another elec- 
tion that needs to be done, which wc 
will be led by Mrs. Marshall. 

CAROLYN MARSHALL: Whereas 
the deed of the John Street United 
Methodist Church calls for the elec- 
tion of the church's board of trustees 
by the General Conference, that plan 
having been approved at the General 
Conference session of 1868, with 
every General Conference since then 
having so elected those trustees. We 
now present the nominees for 1996- 
2000 quadrennium as they come from 
the John Sreet United Methodist 
Church. The resident bishop of the 
New York Area of the United Meth- 
odist Church, Connie Takamine, 
Wilma Roberts, James H. Hohen- 
stein, William C. Kirkwood, WiUiam 
Stau bach, Jr., James Cardwell, Raynor 
Rodgers, and Steven K. Rose. 

BISHOP KNOX: All right. The 
names are before you. I don't suppose 
there are any other nominations; I 
hope not. I don't sec any cards, thank 
the Lord. Now, you will please vote 
"yes" if you approve; "no" if you do 
not approve; and if you arc not sure, 
vote "abstain." Please vote when the 
light appears. And they arc elected. 
[Results: yes, 821; no, 18, abstained, 
76] Thank you ver>' much. Our next 
order, which is an order of the day, is 



74 



April 18, 1996 



the Study of the Ministry report. And 
we are going to ask Bishop Sharon 
Brown Christopher, Bishop David 
Lawson. Do you have something, 
Rex? Excuse me, the committee of 
presiding officers needs to make a 
report. 

REX- BEVDSfS (Nebraska): To an- 
nounce that tomorrow morning's pre- 
siding officer will be Bishop Donald 
Ott of the Michigan Area. 

BISHOP KNOX: Thank you. All 
right, and now we'll ask our bishops 
Christopher and David Lawson if 
you will come now and present the 
report which has been put in the 
hands of the Council of Bishops for 
four years and was an action of the 
General Conference. So this is one 
of the studies and we're asking 
[pause] They're asking for a brief 
break, so we will ask that V.L. 
Daughtery, we've already heard 
your motion and we wondered now, 
you've made your speech for it. It 
is basically a referral of... Would 
you give us a synopsis, V.L.? He is 
coming to microphone seven, 
please. 

DAUGHTERY: V.L. Daughtery, 
South Georgia Conference. The es- 
sence of the motion... 

BISHOP KNOX: We need a copy of 
the motion. 

Proposal to Priortize Mission, 
Membership Growth 

DAUGHTERY: is to ask and re- 
quest that the legislative commit- 
tees, the agenda on calendar and 
reference give priority to all the ex- 
isting petitions relating to mission, 
ministry, servanthood ministries, 
membership growth, numerical and 
spiritual, and membership decline, 
and that we receive those early in 
this session of the General Confer- 
ence. I was present at a General 
Conference where we picked a 
number out of the air and said we 
were going to grow by that number. 
We didn't grow, and it was an embar- 
rassment. We need to deal from the 
grassroots with persons who are 
feeling these issues and give the ap- 



proval or disapproval of this confer- 
ence on those matters. 

BISHOP KNOX: All right. Is there 
someone who wants to speak against 
the motion. Okay. Over here on the 
left, come to microphone four please, 
microphone four. 

MERLIN ACKERSON (Iowa): I 
think the mtention sounds very good. 
We're all interested in mission; we're 
all interested in ministry; we're all 
interested in growth and evangelism. 
My concern about this motion is that 
we might get bogged down in our 
legislative committees debating 
about what is and what is not appro- 
priate priority, and I think we could 
spin our wheels doing a lot of that 
kind of discussion rather than getting 
to the business of our legislative sec- 
tions. It seems to me that the busi- 
ness in our legislative sections is 
ministry, and it is mission, and it does 
all relate to the priorities of the 
church — that we grow, that we be 
faithful to Jesus Christ. 

BISHOP KNOX: All right. Thank 
you. Anyone want to speak in favor of 
the motion? Are you ready to vote? If 
you will vote in favor of the motion, 
push the "yes" button, if you're not 
in favor push the "no" button, if you 
wish to abstain, push the "abstain" 
button. Please vote when the light 
appears. And the motion does not 
prevail. [Results: yes, 340; no, 539; 
abstained, 44] Thank you very much. 
I see, David, ready? Come to 11, 
come to microphone 11, please. 

Northeast Jurisdiction Appeal to 
Judicial Council 

J. FAY CLEVELAND (Western 
New York): I rise for a point of per- 
sonal privilege. 

BISHOP KNOX: All right. 

CLEVELAND: My personal privi- 
lege would be to move a referral to the 
Judicial Council for a declaratory deci- 
sion, a matter of utmost importance to 
the Northeast Junsdiction and to the 
Northeast Junsdiction Committee on 
Episcopacy. 

The review committee of the 
Northeast Jurisdiction has referred 



three items to the Judicial Council 
regarding a grievance that has been in 
process for 14 months. All parties to 
the grievance are aware of this refer- 
ral and are anticipating and desiring a 
decision to be made as speedily as 
possible. It is my understanding that 
only if this referral becomes an action 
of this General Conference will such 
a declaratory judgement or decision 
be possible at this time. 

Therefore, on behalf of the North- 
east Jurisdiction Committee on Epis- 
copacy and the Northeastern 
Jurisdiction Review Committee and 
all parties to the grievance, I move 
that the General Conference support 
the referrals from the Northeast Ju- 
risdiction Review Committee and re- 
quest declaratory decisions of the 
Judicial Council on those matters at 
the earliest possible opportunity. 

BISHOP KNOX: All right. Is there 
a second? 

UNIDENTIFIED SPEAKER: I 
second it. 

BISHOP KNOX: Would you like to 
speak further? 

CLEVELAND: Only to say that in- 
dividuals have been waiting and hurt- 
ing long enough, and we need to move 
ahead with the process. I believe this 
action would allow us to move ahead 
quickly, fairly, and with justice. 

BISHOP KNOX: All right. This is 
properly before us. Anyone else have 
something they would like to say? Are 
you ready? If you would approve this, 
you will push the "yes" button, if you 
do not approve, the "no" button, 
please vote when the light appears. 

[Results: yes, 715; no, 95; ab- 
stained, 116.] 

BISHOP J. LLOYD KNOX: Thank 
you very much. I beheve that Bishops 
Lawson and Christopher are ready, 
and we will go ahead with the report. 

STEVEN KIMBROUGH: This is a 
part of the report. May we stand and 
sing two stanzas of "Here Am I Lord." 

(song) 

BISHOP DAVID LAWSON: Just a 
word of explanation for you. We have 
been told you were going to have a 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No.3 



cookie break before we made our re- 
port. I would like to share with you 
that you do not get cookies now. And 
you must not hold us responsible for 
that. 



Bishops' Report On 
Study On Ministry 

BISHOP LAWSON: We procrasti- 
nated here for awhile just on your 
behalf but it did not work and so here 
we are. Can you hear me? Thank you. 
I can hear you clear enough. The 
sound people are now aware of our 
needs. Can you hear clearly? All right, 
thank you. Ladies and gentlemen, the 
Council of Bishops by unanimous de- 
cision of those present and voting, 
brings to you our vision for the order- 
ing of ministry in the United Method- 
ist Church which we are calling "The 
ministry of all Christians expressing 
God's mission to the world." 

This vision for United Methodist 
ministry centered us throughout our 
work. Il became the source of energy, 
the central commitment, and the vi- 
sion by which the Council evaluated 
all proposals and suggestions. This 
vision was the birthing place of the 
proposal that follows. Let me remind 
us all that the last General Confer- 
ence, after extensive work and con- 
versation, debate and decision on the 
part of the General Conference, the 
General Conference asked the Coun- 
cil ofBishops to take responsibility for 
developing a proposal for ministry of 
the future. 

The Council has received that dele- 
gation from the General Conference, 
and has been about this work for the 
quadrenniura. We come now to you 
with the report. 

The Report includes both the intro- 
ductory material which you have 
found in yoar DCA and proposed leg- 
islative changes. It also has available 
to you a correction sheet made neces- 
sary because of the process of trans- 
mitting material. A wrong sheet was 
sent to the editor of DCA. 



Add a correction which is a part of 
our visual report. At this session of 
the General Conference by this action 
now, your Council of Bishops pre- 
sents to you our report to you. In this 
report, we are recommending that 
you receive the report, that you place 
it in the processes which we have 
already agreed to, that the legislative 
committees will receive it in due or- 
der and begin their work on it. And 
when in time, legislative proposals 
return to the body for consideration 
and action, we will have before us 
continuing, the report of the ministry 
study. 

What that means is, in keeping 
with rule 36 of our Rules of Order, as 
the report is made, those who brought 
the report will have opportunity to 
speak to amendments to it, if there is 
concern about the substance of 
change that is being made. 

Now this is normal procedure for a 
General Conference. However, the 
people making the report are not nor- 
mally makinga report. And so, when we 
come back for that time of our work, we 
will need your permission for a bishop 
or two to speak to the issues before us. 
And that's ahead of us when the reports 
begin to come back 

I'd like to say to you, that openness 
to God's spirit leads us away in our 
work, from parenthetical assump- 
tions, assumptions of control, and 
dominance and unequal value, to an 
organic view of inter-related ness and 
inter-relatedness among a variety of 
ministries, an organic view. 

These ministries we said to our- 
selves are all of equal value. God's 
spirit continued to lead us from pariia- 
mentary rules and decision making by 
vote to an openness toward experi- 
menting with the gift of God's dis- 
cernment. 

In order to remain open to the guid- 
ance and surprises from our God, we as 
a council made several commitments. 
First, worship was to be the center 
of all study and deliberation. 

Second, the council and its study 
committee were committed to a radi- 
cal openness to whatever outcome 
God might provide. 



Third, as a council, we committed 
ourselves to intensive study of all past 
ministry studies dating back into the 
1960's; parallel studies from other de- 
nominations around the world, re- 
source materials from the earliest 
days of our predecessor denomina- 
tions. 

Fourth, we committed ourselves to 
listen, listen, listen, listen. The intro- 
duction to the proposal which you 
have in your hands, lists the repre- 
sentative groups with whom we spent 
time. Omitted from that list is the 
National Association of Local Pastors. 
In addition, we asked every episcopal 
area in the world to organize response 
groups to read and evaluate the early 
written documents. Each of their re- 
ports was carefully read, ideas and 
suggestions were gleaned, refine- 
ments were made to the developing 
proposal over time. 

In light of ou r emphasis on the min- 
istry of all Christians, we were de- 
lighted to discover that over 500, over 
500, lay people were involved in this 
listening process. The fifth commit- 
ment, resource papers were devel- 
oped, allowing intense examination 
and development of various aspects of 
the issues. Sixth, consensus decision 
making, or if you care to call it that, 
United Methodist conferencing, was 
the style throughout the process. 

Proposals were continually rewrit- 
ten reflecting what was heard and 
learned. We took no votes until the 
final vote in the final presentation to 
the Council of Bishops. 

And finally, seventh, we recognize 
that there was a continuing need for 
the formation, the shaping of the spiri- 
tual life of all Christians, laity and 
clergy ahke. And that was founda- 
tional for any proposal that would ever 
be written, and is, in this proposal, 
woven through all of its provisions. 

Call for Discernment 

BISHOP SHARON BROWN 
CHRISTOPHER: This proposal for 
ministry in the United Methodist 
Church represents the stewardship of 
the Council of Bishops. Wc offer it now 



76 



April 18, 1996 



to the General Conference with the 
hope that you will join us in the 
prayerful open search for God's lead- 
ership in this critical matter. 

Last night, Bishop Craig urged us 
to gather together around the table, 
prayerfully attempting to discern 
God's will for our Church. In this 
spirit, let us now lay aside our cau- 
cuses and special mtercsts, open our 
minds and hearts, respectfully listen 
and learn from one another, and seek 
the leadership of God's spirit. 

BISHOP LAWSON: Central to our 
understanding of ministry is the task 
of equipping the church for the minis- 
try of all Christians. There's been a 
genuine excitement in the Council of 
Bishops around this emphasis from 
the very beginning. In several meet- 
ings, the council sent a clear message 
to its study committee. "If you do not 
accomplish anything more," they 
said, "find ways of energizing the 
church for this task." 

A part of this energy grew out of our 
vision of enabling church members to 
identify themselves as ministers of 
Jesus Christ, by assisting them in un- 
derstanding how this ministry in the 
world can be expressed, commission- 
ing them for such ministries, and 
sending members of our churches out 
from the congregations with a sense 
of vocation. 

BISHOP CHRISTOPHER: A part 
of the council's energy grew out of a 
confession. Despite many worthy 
programs and organizational struc- 
tures, our United Methodist Church 
has not achieved this goal of enabling 
all persons for ministry. We still de- 
fine the highest lay achievement in 
tenns of holding denominational of- 
fices and committee memberships. 
We still tend to define lay ministry as 
service in the institutional church. 
The full power of our Christian disci- 
pleship is thereby limited, perhaps 
thwarted. 

BISHOP LAWSON: And thus 
every proposal in this report is condi- 
tioned by this vision of the ministry of 
all Christians in the world. A vision of 
over ten million United Methodist 
people moving to the structures of 



society, prepared to identify them- 
selves as followers of Jesus Christ, 
prepared by their congregations to 
understand in fresh ways how this 
ministry may be exercised in the 
world of work and play, in neighbor- 
hoods, wherever: amendments to the 
legislation about the local congrega- 
tions, the proposed stewards of lay 
ministry, the newly evolved ordamed 
deacons, the newly focused ordained 
ciders who are also deacons and carry 
the deacon responsibilities, adjust- 
ments to legislation concerning local 
pastors. 

The definition and responsibilities 
of bishops and district superinten- 
dents are all conditioned by this prin- 
cipal thrust and single understanding. 
Our baptism marks us all as ministers 
of Jesus Christ. All of us of equal value 
in the sight of God and one another. 
No expression ofChristian ministry is 
more important than any other. 

Distinctions Between Ministries 

BISHOP CHRISTOPHER: When 
the family of God gathers around the 
Lord's Table, we arc reminded that 
we are sisters and brothers in Christ. 
Each of us greatly loved by God, and 
called to service. 

BISHOP LAWSON: In the Apostle 
Paul's imagery we are the body of 
Christ. This is our essential identity. 

BISHOP CHRISTOPHER: Some 
of us are feet, some hands. 

BISHOP LAWSON: Some eyes, 
some ears. 

BISHOP CHRISTOPHER: Within 
our equality, there is diversity. God 
called some within the family to serve 
on behalf of the entire family. All are 
needed. 

BISHOP LAWSON: And thus 
while all ministry belongs to the en- 
tire church, specific expressions of 
that ministry focus in specific offices. 
God calls some of us to a lifetime of 
servant vocation, witness, service on 
behalf of all the others. 

BISHOP CHRISTOPHER: Oth- 
ers are called to service in the con- 
text of their secular vocations and in 
volunteer ministnes through the lo- 



cal church. We believe that the three 
offices recommended in this proposal 
are needed to enable and equip the 
ministry of allChristians in the world. 

Lay Ministry Steward 

BISHOP LAWSON: As they are 
proposed, these offices kneel at the 
Lord's Table in solidanty with all of 
God's people The distinct responsi- 
bility to which God has called them, 
wholly integrated with, and suppor- 
tive of, the servant ministry of the 
entire church. 

One office, in which persons may 
feel God calling them to express their 
life vocation, we're suggesting to you 
is the lay m inistry steward , or in other 
language, the steward of lay ministry. 
When you recall the power, the spiri- 
tual power, of lay leadership in the 
early days of the movement called 
Methodism in the United States, 
those class leaders, and stewards and 
others — this new office has an excit- 
ing possibility in it that's movemental 
in its nature. It certainly is in harmony 
with the cry which came back to us 
from all the hearing processes, a re- 
quest on the part of lay persons 
around the denomination for a new 
level of spiritual leadership for them- 
selves in this evolving church. 

The lay ministry steward is called 
to innovative, disciplined, responsive 
support to the ministry of all Chris- 
tians in and through the congregation. 
Called by God, affirmed through the 
discernment of the pastor in the local 
congregation, the lay ministry stew- 
ard works under the guidance of the 
pastor in a collegial relationship with 
all other leaders in the congregation. 

In contrast, the specific functional 
responsibihties for program and ad- 
ministration in the local church, the 
lay ministry steward has a single pur- 
pose: that of assisting the congrega- 
tion in the development of Christian 
disciplcship and in advancing the min- 
istry of the laity in the world. 

BISHOP DAVID J. LAWSON: 
The lay ministry steward will seek 
out and help members identify their 
skills, will help them be in ministry, 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No.3 



77 



beawitnessintheirworkplaccduring 
the week, help them to disburse into 
the world scattered as God's people. 
One concern with spiritual formation 
of the people of God, the lay ministry 
steward will seek for themselves 
training in small group life, Bible 
study, most important, the theology 
of work, and other related matters. 

Within this focus, this office is de- 
signed with the greatest flexibility 
possible. Since we have only been 
partially successful in emphasizing lay 
ministry in the world, we're chal- 
lenged to allow for experimentation, 
innovation, flexibility. In order to pre- 
vent competition in the congregation, 
we must contain this office within the 
accountability structures of that con- 
gregation. 

It is our belief that God is now 
calling lay persons to this kind of ser- 
vant leadership. This new office pro- 
posed to you creates an avenue of 
expression of this call with account- 
ability in the congregation. In a proc- 
ess similar to persons seeking 
pastoral ministry, the pastor and the 
congregation will explore with them 
the nature of their call, the gifts they 
bring for the service, and lead the 
congregation to discern whether or 
not they should be affirmed for the 
office. This is a practice with which 
we are quite familiar now with candi- 
dates. And for this reason, not all 
congregations will have such persons 
in their midst. 

BISHOP SHARON BROWN 
CHRISTOPHER: While God calls all 
persons to ministry, God calls some 
to a lifetime vocation within the body 
of Christ. These persons enter into 
covenant relationship with God and 
the Church and arc designated for 
specific leadership through prayer 
and the laying on of hands. Ordination 
is a pubhc sign and act in which the 
Church affirms God's gifts, and 
authorizes their use through the work 
of those who are called as ordained 
ministers. 

Now servant leadership is the foun- 
dation for all ministry, including the 
ministry of the ordained. The Church 
of Jesus Christ has one ministry in 



which all Christians are called. With 
the leadership of God's spirit, certain 
portions of this total ministry are fo- 
cused in persons called by God, and 
provided by God with gifts and grace 
needed for specific forms of leader- 
ship. Within this understanding, we 
have identified two ministerial orders 
of ordained persons. 

BISHOP DAVID J. LAWSON: The 
first order we've identified is our new 
understanding and appropriation of 
the office of deacon The church cur- 
rently has ordained deacons and con- 
secrated diaconal ministers. This 
proposal seeks to enhance and to de- 
velop the diaconal office, allowing the 
richness and central purpose of these 
historic offices to flow into a newly 
ordained deacon. 

Order of Deacon 

Deacons arc persons called by God, 
authorized by the church (the mean- 
ing of ordination), and ordained by a 
bishop to a lifetime of servant leader- 
ship in both the community and the 
congregation in a ministry that con- 
nects the two. 

In the world, this new deacon, this 
ordained deacon, seeks to express a 
ministry of compassion and justice, 
assisting lay persons as they claim 
theirown ministry. And in the congre- 
gation the ministry of the deacon is to 
teach and to inform disciples, to lead 
worship together with other ordained 
persons and laity, to celebrate the sac- 
rament of baptism , to assist the elders 
in the sacrament of the Lord's Supper. 

The deacon models service, invit- 
ing others to their own servant min- 
istry in the world. We anticipate that 
the appointment for deacon will, in 
most instances, be outside the insti- 
tutional church, in the world of work 
and marketplace. These deacons will 
carry out ministries of service, com- 
passion, and justice. In those in- 
stances where their appointment is 
within the local congregation, dea- 
cons must demonstrate that this 
placement specifically affinns the in- 
ter-rclatcdness of worship and work. 



BISHOP CHRISTOPHER: The 
ministry of the deacon will take many 
forms. Some will be employed in their 
place of service. Others may serve as 
volunteers. Some may be employed 
by schools, colleges, theological 
schools, or by church-related health 
and welfare agencies. Some will serve 
as educators, both in the church and 
in the community. Much of the serv- 
ice will be in settings that have no 
explicit religious affiliation. 

In every instance, the deacon will 
also receive an appointment in a local 
congregation, and will share in the 
responsibility for leading other Chris- 
tians into theirown ministries of serv- 
ice. In rare instances, when the 
deacon volunteers, the bishop may 
appoint the deacon to a special assign- 
ment as a volunteer without financial 
support. These will be instances of 
special need and critical urgency. 

We must emphasize that this order 
of deacon is new. While it flows out of 
previous expressions of diaconal 
service, it is different from all pre- 
vious kinds of consecrated and or- 
dained forms. 

Order of Elder 

BISHOP LAWSON: The second 
ordained ministerial order we've 
identified for you is the ordcrof elder. 
The Council of Bishops proposes a 
vital and newly focused ordained 
elder, called by God, authorized by 
the Church, and ordained by the 
bishop. The elder enters into a life- 
time itinerant ministry of Word, Sac- 
rament, and Order. The elder leads in 
the ordering of the life of the church 
for the fulfillment of its central task. 
And you will not be surprised at this, 
of preparing Christian disciples for 
their service in the world. 

The servant leadership of the elder 
is expressed by leading the people of 
God in worship and prayer, in leading 
people to faith in Jesus Christ, by ex- 
ercising pastoral supervision in the 
congregation, and by leading the 
church in obedience to mission in the 
world. 



April 18, 1996 



At a time when the church is redis- 
covering the ccntrality of service in all 
of its ministries, we affinu the con- 
tinuing responsibility of the elder to 
fulfill their servant leadership as dea- 
cons, while serving as ciders. And as 
such, to.be bound by the meaning of 
the deacon's ordination, and thus, in 
every congregation there will be the 
servant leadership, the presence of 
the deacon, sometimes m the form of 
the new deacon, sometimes in the 
form of the elder w ho is also a deacon, 
sometimes through the ministry of 
the local pastor who serves, and is 
licensed under the guidance of an 
elder. This proposal emphasizes that 
the deacon's ordination is founda- 
tional to all ordination. 

BISHOP CHRISTOPHER: All 
clergy, both deacon and elder, upon 
election to full membership in the an- 
nual conference, shall be members of 
and participate in the order appropri- 
ate to their election. 

Now an order is a mutually suppor- 
tive covenant community within the 
church to care for and hold account- 
able its members for the sake of the 
life and mission of the church. These 
orders seek to respond to the spiritual 
hunger among clergy for a fulfilling 
sense of vocation, for support among 
peers, for a deepening relationship 
with God. 

Now they are not exclusive clubs of 
insiders, but are spiritual communi- 
ties that supplement and deepen the 
formation that deacons and elders re- 
ceive through congregational life and 
exist to assist in the continuing forma- 
tion of clergy for their vocation. Each 
order will provide for regular gather- 
ings of ordained deacons and ordained 
elders; will assist in plans for individ- 
ual study and retreat expcncnces; will 
develop a bond of unity and common 
commitment to mission and ministry; 
will help create relationships of mu- 
tual trust and support; and will pro- 
vide accountability and offer support 
for the members in the fulfiUing of 
these purposes. 

The bishop will convene and pro- 
vide continuing spiritual leadership 
for each order with the support and 



assistance of the Board of Ordained 
Ministry. The board will nominate in 
the order and elect quadrennially a 
chairperson of the order, who, in co- 
operation with, and with the guidance 
of the bishop, will provide continuing 
leadership for the order. The chair- 
person will be responsible for imple- 
mentation of plans and activities, will 
represent the order on the Confer- 
ence Board of Ordained Ministry, and 
will serve on the board's executive 
committee. 

Plan for Local Pastors 

BISHOP LAWSON: Now within 
this new vision for ministry in our 
denomination, the bishops recognize 
that there need to be new provisions 
for the local pastors, these persons' 
vital spiritual leadership in increasing 
ways in our denomination. 

Our proposal allows local pastors to 
continue in long terra service by com- 
pleting a course of study. The as- 
sumption currently held in our Book 
of Discipline that these persons need 
to continue toward associate mem- 
bership is being removed from this 
proposal, as are college require- 
ments. However, should a local pastor 
choose to do so, provision is made for 
the fulfilhnent of requirements for or- 
dination as a deacon, and then sub- 
sequent process through a pro- 
bationary period toward the ordina- 
tion of elder. 

To exercise this option, you will 
discover the local pastor must reach 
the age of forty years, must have com- 
pleted a five year course of study, and 
thirty-two semester hours of gradu- 
ate theological study or its equivalent. 

Plan for Transitional Provisions 

The council realizes that this new 
understanding of ministry requires 
some transitional provisions. Be- 
cause the office of diaconal minister, 
as well as the current ordained dea- 
con, have flowed into the new or- 
dained deacon, we recommend that 
the consecration of new diaconal min- 



isters be discontinued as the ordina- 
tion of the current style of deacon. 

All persons who have begun the 
candidacy for diaconal ministry prior 
to January 1, 1997, may proceed under 
the provisions of the 1992 Book of 
Discipline. Persons currently serving 
as diaconal ministers may continue 
their service as long as they desire or 
until their retirement. Provision is 
made for those desinng to do so, that 
is, those diaconal ministers who de- 
sire to do so, to enter into a process 
of becoming an ordained deacon. 

And because local pastors will now 
have the possibility of becoming or- 
dained deacons, and proceeding 
through probationary membership to 
full membership in the conference 
and ordination as elders, we recom- 
mend the discontinuation of the status 
of associate members. 

Current associate members in good 
standing may continue until their re- 
tirement or until they arc discontin- 
ued for other reasons. Associate 
members in good standing as of Janu- 
ary 1, 1997, may, after meeting speci- 
fied requirements, be elected as full 
members of the annual conference 
and ordained elders as a part of a tran- 
sitional provision. 

There are many other recommen- 
dations and adjustments in the cur- 
rent legislation. In every instance, all 
proposals focus on, as the highest pri- 
ority, the ministry of all Christians in 
the world. The Council of Bishops 
commends this ministerial proposal 
to you for your own prayerful consid- 
eration. The recommendations come 
after extensive study of past ministe- 
rial proposals and study commissions, 
review of current studies of other 
Christian bodies around the world, 
examination of more alternatives than 
you can believe. 

The council offers these proposals 
in the belief that they will advance the 
cause of Jesus Christ, and will en- 
hance the ministry of all United Meth- 
odist Christians in a time that calls for 
a fresh focus on the ministry of wit- 
ness and service outward into the so- 
ciety and community. We offer this to 
you with a great deal of excitement, 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No.3 



79 



and frankly, with no small amount of 
passion. 

BISHOP CHRISTOPHER: Now 
we begin the process of seeking the 
wisdom of this whole faith commu- 
nity, under the guidance of the Holy 
Spirit. We have received the report 
from the Council of Bishops. We have 
received news reports, recommen- 
dations from many quarters, and ad- 
vice from friends. Now we also 
receive an invitation from the Coun- 
cil of Bishops. 

The bishops invite this General 
Conference to accept the same disci- 
pline that guided our search. 

Number one: Acknowledging all 
that we think, feel, fear, and hope, and 
admitting that we come here with our 
heads full of ideas and partial conclu- 
sions, we also affirm that our hearts 
are open to new guidance from God. 
Number two: We will surround all 
we do with worship. Prayer will be the 
context for our work. 

Number three: We will respectfully 
listen to one another with the will to 
learn and question. 

Number four: We will provide occa- 
sional moments of silence in our de- 
liberations in order that we may 
remember whose will it is we seek. 

Number five: We will believe that 
this church can discover the leader- 
ship of God's spirit. The ancient ones 
of the Christian faith discovered that 
those seeking the gift of discern- 
ment need to be in a worshiping 
community. They need to under- 
stand the issue at hand, remember 
their purpose, and discover relevant 
information. Prayer is critical for it 
opens the mind and the heart to the 
possibility of new insight. The most 
difficult learning is the necessity of 
being open to surprises. This last 
faith attitude was called "sacred in- 



difference to the outcome." God may 
choose to lead us on to new paths. 
Please remember that as you do your 
work,theCouncilofBishopsisengag- 
inginanaround-thc-clockprayervigil 
everyday fortwo weeks. They will be 
prayingforall the work ofthe General 
Conference, including what we do 
here today. In the prayer room, in 
your private residence, the bishops 
invite you to share in this spiritual 
discipline. 

Please, God, help us to discover 
wisdom as we search for the paths you 
would have us follow. 

Sending Forth to Special Committees 

This is how we are to proceed: The 
Committee on Plan of Organization 
and Rules of Order proposed that we 
approve the following procedure. At 
the announced time, each delegate is 
to go to the assigned room for your 
reflection group, and you should have 
on your table those assignments for 
you. 

There will be a moderator who will 
guide you through the process, assist- 
ing you as you explore the ministry 
proposal. The process will be ex- 
plained when the groups first meet. 
Please work together to ensure that 
all who wish to speak may have the 
opportunity. This is not the occasion 
for debate. It's not the occasion to 
persuade or dispute. It is in the legis- 
lative committee and the plenary ses- 
sion where such can happen. Here, 
we seek to share and to listen and to 
learn. 

It is hoped thai all delegates will 
feel free to express their hopes, sug- 
gestions, and questions. Three guid- 
ing questions will be used to 
encourage the shanng. First, how 
does this document lead us into spiri- 



tual growth? How does this proposal 
help us to be a missional church? And 
how does this document help lead us 
into a more faithful equipping of the 
laity for mission? 

The recorders for your group will 
carefully record your discussion, lis- 
tening for consensus and questions. 
They will then prepare a short docu- 
ment representing the consensus 
points and concerns of your entire 
reflection group, and will join the 
other recorders in discussion to iden- 
tify the consensus points, the points 
of clarification, and the concerns of 
the entire General Conference. 

A group of compilers will work in 
room C205 with these reports and 
prepare a written statement of what 
has been discerned. And this state- 
ment will be given to the Legislative 
Committee on Ordained Ministry. 

It is that legislative committee 
which will receive all matters related 
to the ministry proposal. Then the 
legislative committee will work with 
the ministry proposal and all related 
petitions and report their recommen- 
dations to the plenary session of this 
General Conference. 

Please note, persons who can clar- 
ify provisions of the proposal can be 
reached nearby your meeting room. 
You are encouraged to send for one of 
these persons if further information is 
needed in your group. 

Now you are invited to make your 
way to an assigned room. Please be 
aware that this is the first work ofthe 
1996 General Conference. You enter 
a new faith community with a holy 
purpose. You will find Christ in your 
gathering, so enter with anticipation 
and hearts full of grace. And let us go 
on our way by joining together in the 
last verse ofhyran number 593, "Here 
I Am, Lord." May God bless us all. 



TELL 

THE FOLKS 

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Brought to you by 







DailyRepoct 



Daily Christian Advocate 

THE GENERAL CONFERENCE OF THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 



Denver, Colorado 



Friday, April 19, 1996 



Vol. 3 No. 4 



God Is in This Place 



Those who were in Oklahoma City April 19. 1995, will 
always remember that day in particular, and the days 
after, as a city and community united to stand up to 
tragedy. Onthatday.one would wonder: where was God? 

The awful sight of the federal building is now gone. In 
its place is the beginning of a beautiful park. A people's 
faith, courage and determination are reflected in such 
beauty and newness. Life goes on amid stark reminders 
of what happened here. Recovery . . . healing . . . rebuild- 
ing, yet, for some, the struggle still continues. 



The Scripture paints a vivid picture of people rebuilding 
out of ruin and claiming the promises of God: things new 
and lasting, things better than before. Let us hope this 
tor the people of Oklahoma City. Today, amid freshly 
planted trees, flowers and green grass, a city will remem- 
ber and give thanks to a God who was — and is — there! 

— The Rev. Thomas Roughface, 
Oklahoma Indian Missionary Conference 



"There's a song in every silence, 

seeking word and melody; 
there's a dawn in every darkness, 

bringing hope to you and me. 

From the past will come the future; 

what it holds, a mystery, 

unrevealed until its season, 

something God alone can see." 

— Natalie Sleeth 

In Remembrance 
OMabowa City 
April 19, 1995 

As we remember this tragedy, iwalso 
reflect on Liberia and the many other 
places of destruction and suffering in 
God's world 



'4 






<M» 



One ot the nineteen quilts made by Susan Lucky, in 
honor of the children killed in the bombing. 

photo by John Goodwin 



82 



April 19, 1996 




Let's be aware of who is watching us. Young eyes are watching us 
Marvel Humper, daughter of Bishop Joseph Christian Humper. wit- 
nesses the proceedings. photo John Gooawm 





Agenda 




Friday, April 19 


8:15 


Choral Music 


8:30 


Worship 


9:00 


CaU to Order 


9:05 


General Council on Ministries Report 


9:25 


Committee on Courtesy and Privileges 




Committee on Presiding Officers 




Committee on Agenda and Calendar 


9:40 


Legislative Committees 


12:30 


Lunch Recess 


2:30 


Legislative Committees 


5:00 


Dinner Recess 


7:30 


Legislative Committees 



Daily Christian Advocate 

Editonal Offices - Exhibit Hall A 

Denver Convention Center 

Sales and Subscriptions - DCA Booth 



Editor J . Richard Peck 

Associate Editor Sheda McGee 

Assistant Editor Joan Shoup 

Roundup and Photo Editor Brad Motta 

News and Features Editor Barbara JDuniap-Berg 

News and Features Writers Roger Burgess, Keith Pohl 

Computer Manager/Calendar Editor Mike Cunningham 

Ccmposition Editor for Proceedings Gayl Hinton 

Composition Editor lor News and Features Richard Street 

Recorder A rainer/Ccnversion Specialist Glenn Hinton 

Assistant Trainer Vern Denney 

Manager of Audio Transcnption George Dunn 

Audio Tecnniaans Gilbert Elam, Steve Fleener, Walter Patton 

Coordinator of Verbatim Transcribers Angela Butler 

TranscTiba:s Heather Peck. Alice Gabel, Michelle Newman 

Coordinator of Copy Editors Marvin Cropsey 

Copy Editors Martha Cooper. Beverly Salmon, Phyllis Weeby, Patty Meyers 

Marjorie Pierson, Dick Thomburg 

Verbatim Proofreader/Channel B Identifiers John Thomburg. Bod McClean 

Index Editor Thelma Boeder 

Production Manager Billy Murptiy 

Sales Manager Juanita Freudenthal 

Sales Representatives Barbara Acuff, Aneal Joseph. Marge Poteeie 

Distribution Manager Cedric Foley 

Office Manager Mocnell Hughes 

Host/Hostesses joAnn Clark, Roberta Sterrenberg. Burl Kreps 



Top Ten Reasons for Going to 
General Conference 



10. You never have to explain who John Welsey 

was. 

9. No one tries to sell you a raffle ticket. 

8. Everyone has a name tag so you don't have to 

remember any names. 

7. You get sermon ideas that no one else from your 

congregation has heard. 

6. You get to ride the escalators. 

5. You get a commemorative hymnal that doesn't 

match any other hymnal in your church. 

4. You know where your bishop is. 

3. You finally get to watch a big screen T.V. 

2. You can see the many different styles of dark 

blue suits. 

1. When you speak on the floor of conference, 

someone writes down every word you say and they 

publish it even if it doesn't make any sense. 

—Brad Motta 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No.4 



Day Three: a Call To Witness and Prayer 



As delegates streamed toward the convention center 
on day three, more and more delegates were carrymg 
their DCAs, Bibles, Disciplines and reports m wheeled 
luggage as then- piles of paper grew. 

Morning Worship 

The morning worship service began with the enthusi- 
astic and disciphned voices of the Maranatha Choir of 
University United Methodist Church, Gainesville, Fla., 
led by Robert W. Jackson. In the sermon, Albany [N.Y.] 
Area Bishop William Boyd Grove continued the unity 
theme with quotations from John Wesley. Can we be- 
come men and women of "catholic spirit," he asked, 
"willmg to pray with those who disagree with us, and long 
for their welfare? . . If your heart (not your opmions) is 
as my heart, give me your hand." Bishop Grove encour- 
aged a unity "that will surprise our church." That plea 
was met with a lengthy, standing ovation. 

Discussion and Prayer 

Following worship, presiding Bishop Donald A. Ott, 
Michigan Area, reminded delegates that in the Episcopal 
Address the bishops asked that all meetings begin with 
five minutes of one-on-one conversation and prayer, es- 
pecially between persons who do not know each other 
well. Delegates pondered two questions: What is my most 
earnest hope for the next few hours of this conference? 
What do I believe is God's most fervant hope for these 
next few hours? Then they joined in prayer, beseeching 
God to combine the two hopes into one. 

A Call to Witness and Prayer 

A 90-minute celebration of United Methodism's his- 
toric stance in support of human rights for all persons 
inspired positive response. 

The Commission on the General Conference had 
scheduled the special event in response to concern over 
the 1992 action by Colorado voters who passed a state 
constitutional amendment denying human-rights protec- 
tion to homosexuals. The amendment, later overturned 
by a Colorado court, is now before the nation's Supreme 
Court. Because of this controversy, many United Meth- 
odists had wanted to move General Conference to an- 
other state. The idea of an on-site witness prevailed. 

The moving service included Scripture reading, sing- 
ing, praying and witnessing by persons reflecting the 
inclusiveness and worldwide nature of United 
Methodism. 

F. Belton Joyner Jr., Raleigh, N.C., recalled God's grace 
in history, the examples of Christ and John Wesley's 



concern for human rights. Referring to Colorado Amend- 
ment 2, he said "some of our colleagues in United 
Methodism felt it was at odds with our historic Wesleyan 
witness for human and civil rights for all. Some of our 
family saw the amendment to deny to gay, lesbian and 
bi-sexual persons basic human and civil rights, and our 
tradition says 'no' to such denial. 

"To be sure," he continued, "some of our United Meth- 
odist kin supported the amendment and saw it as an 
extension of our official denominational view that the 
practice of homosexuality is incompatible with Christian 
teaching, . . yet here we are. . We call ourselves to 
prayers of repentance for ways we have violated or looked 
past others. We make witness to God's freeing gift of basic 
nghls tor all humankind." 

Scnpture was read in Spanish and English by Mary 
Silva, San Antonio, and F. Belton Joyner Jr.. Raleigh, N.C. 

in the meditation, William Abraham of Perkins School 
of Theology, Dallas, remmded delegates of Jesus' teach- 
ing and healing ministnes, sending his disples to do the 
same. "We dare to go forward under the authority of 
Jesus Christ," he said. "We cannot limit the kingdom." 
He noted that we must make disciples who will gladly "be 
spent in the service of justice and peace." 

Andrei Kim, Moscow, Russia, spoke of the severe 
limits on religious, human and civil rights in his country. 
Dorothy Yoeman, Elgin, 111., movingly described the jus- 
tice problems faced by imprisoned, battered women and 
her opposition to the death penalty. Randy Miller, San 
Francisco, witnessed on behalf of justice and rights for 
gays and lesbians and his own knowledge of "the rejection 
of being the unwelcome guest." 

Minerva G. Carcano, Albuquerque, N.M., told how she 
experienced the "darkness within us" as she heard be- 
hind-the-scenes statements of racism, sexism and homo- 
phobia at both Junsdictional and General Conferences. 
Francisco de Castro Maria, an Iliff School of Theology 
student, described human rights problems in his native 
Angola, caused by grueling economic conditions and mas- 
sive refugee migrations. 

As the witnessing continued, delegates became m- 
creasingly involved, standing and applauding the speak- 
ers. 

Leading delegates in a "season of prayer," Bishop Rue- 
ben P. Job, Nashville, Tenn., said: "Prayer is the universal 
language of us all." 

The service closed with the Wesley covenant prayer 
which ends, "0 glorious and blessed God . . . you are mine, 
and I am yours. So be it. May the covenant which I have 
made on earth be ratified in heaven." 

— Roger Burgess 



Apnl 19, 1996 



Announcements 



The Missoun East/Missouri West Conference lunch 
will be held at 12:15 p.m. Friday, April 19, at the Holiday 
Inn. The cost is $15 and all Missourians attending General 
Conference are invited. For more information talk to Rev 
Cody Collier or Dr Rhymes Moncurc. 

For those holding reservations to Higher Education 
Night: Buses to the University of Denver will be available 
at the main entrance of the Convention Center between 
4:15 and 5:30 p.m. and will return to the Convention 
Center after the program. 

BMCR dinner tickets and bus pick-up tune information 
will be delivered to delegates' seats this morning. Others 
can pick up their envelopes at the visitors counter. 

The New York Conference dinner will be held Wednes- 
day, Apnl 24, 5:30 p.m., m the Denver Room of the 
Marriott Hotel, $33. Reservations must be made by 5 p.m 
Friday. Contact Ernest Swiggett (297-1300) or Jane A 
Middleton (571-0300) 

We're worried! Are you here? Yom prepaid tickets for 
Sunday's special events tour are being held at the ticket 
booth in Lx)bby A. You must claim your tickets by noon 
Friday. 

Youth Rally, Saturday, April 20, 10 a.m.— 12 noon. 
Convention Center, East Plaza. Sponsored by "Open the 
Doors." 

Conference council on ministnes directors and their 
guests may meet the bus on Monday, April 22, at 12:40 
p.m. (in the circular drive off the 14th St. exit) for the 
luncheon at Rounders Restaurant at the Sandlot at Coors 
Field. Look for your host wearing the Colorado Rockies 
jacket. The bus will return in time for the 2:30 p.m. 
plenary session. Reservations may still be made with 
Sachi Boyer in Room 113. 

The HIV/AIDS Ministries Network and the Health and 
Welfare Ministries Program Department, General Board 
of Global Ministnes, The United Methodist Church will 
sponsor a HIV/AIDS Memonal Service of "Hope, Help 
and Heahng" in Grand Ballrooms B and C of the Adam's 
Mark Hotel, 1550 Court Place on Tuesday, Apnl 23. at 
12:45 p.m. Bishop Leontine Kelly will be preaching 

Tennessee Conference delegates and friends are cor- 
dially invited to attend a dinner at the Holiday Inn, 
Wednesday, Apnl 24, 5:15 - 7 p.m. Cost, $15.20. Please 
give your money to James R. King or Betty M. Alexander 
by Monday afternoon, April 22. 

Delegates and friends from the New Jersey area are 
invited to gather for a luncheon at 12:45 p.m. on Wednes- 
day, Apnl 24. m the Holiday Inn. Contact either June 
McCullough in the Southern New Jersey delegation (Sec- 



tion C, Row 13)orBob Brandt in theNorthemNew Jersey 
delegation (Section A, Row 1) to make your reservation. 

How do Hispanics study the Bible using the "Judge, See 
and Act" methodology? Come, find out! Study the Bible 
from a Hispanic perspective Friday and Saturday 7-8 a.m. 
and Monday through Wednesday same time in A102 of 
the Convention Center. 

Tired? Cansado? Come and prop up your feet in our 
Hospitality Center, Suite 1701, Hyatt Regency, Welton 
and 17th. Open Monday through Friday 10:00 a.m.— 5:00 
p.m. and Saturday noon — 5:00 p.m. We await your visit! 

Delegates who wish the full text of the case forwarded 
by the leadership of St. Paul's U.M.C. in Coronado, Calif., 
and a response to that perspective may request this 
document from the California-Pacific delegation chair, 
Becky Haase, 

New England delegates will hold a dinner honoring 
Bishop and Mrs. Herbert Skeete on Wednesday April 24, 
10 be held at the Holiday Inn at 5:45 p.m. All delegates 
and inends of the Boston Area are invited to attend. 
Please contact Dient Cram, Section D, Row 10, Seat 6, for 
reservations. Cost $20.00 per person. 

Global Praise CDs and audiocassettes are available at 
the Cokesbur>' Bookstore: 

1) Songs for tlxe Poor, hymns of Charles Wesley. Pro- 
ceeds go to Bishops Appeal for Africa. 

2) Africa Praise I, songs of faith from eight African 
countries performed by the Africa University Chofr. Pro- 
ceeds go to Africa University. 

3) Global Praise I, songs of the Christian faith from 
around the world. 

4) Spirituals, Songs from the American Experience, 
songs by Steven Kimbrough and Cynthia Wilson-Felder. 

^fesserffe^/jeWowen.'Join us for worship Sunday, April 
21, 1996 at 10:00 a.m. in Ballroom 4 of the Colorado 
Convention Center, sponsored by the General Commis- 
sion on the Status and Role of Women. Obispa Graciela 
Alvarez Delgado from la Conferencia Anual de Mexico 
will be preaching. Bishop Ann Brookshire Sherer will be 
the celebrant and Francis E. W. Guidry will be the litur- 
gist Also sharing in worship will be Cynthia Wilson- 
Feider music leader, and The Celebrants, a sacred dance 
choir. 

Indiana Area Bishop Woodie W. White was elected 
president of the Council of Bishops. He succeeds Los 
Angeles Area Bishop Roy I. Sano. 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No.4 



85 



The chalices and patens used for 
Holy Communion during the 1996 
General Conference opening worship 
are being made available by Cokes- 
bury The sets will be taken to vari- 
ous places in the United States, 
including Brentwood, Tenn.; Grand 
Rapids Mich.; Pearl River, N.Y.; 
Pueblo, Colo.; Salt Lake City, Utah; 
and Thornton, Colo. We at DCA are 
curious about how the chalice and 
paten sets will be used when they 
reach their final destinations. If you 
have purchased a set for a special 
ceremony or event, please stop by 
the DCA office and tell Brad Motta. A 
future DCA article will describe the 
vanous uses of the chalices. 

— Marcy Barnes 




ptoeDjoba Goodwn 



Advice from the Experts on New 
Paraments and Stoles 



Get your questions answered by the experts from Abbott Hall. Visit the General Conference 
Cokesbury store to talk with knowledgeable professionals about your needs in paraments and 
stoles. Examine the samples of our finest pieces, and take advantage of guidance from the 
experts on custom pieces. 



We will be happy to make appointments 
for those on a tight schedule. See your 
Cokesbury representative. 



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86 



April 19. 1996 



University Senate and Judicial 
Council Nominations 

UNIVERSITY SENATE 

Appoint four, two of whom shall be executive offi- 
cers of United Metliodist-related educational insti- 
tutions, the other two holding other positions 
relevant to academic or financial affairs or church 
relationships (111517.2) 

1. Kevin LaGree (Candler/Eraory) 

2. Shirley A. R. Lewis (Panic College) 

3. Robert Edgar (School of Theology at Clareraont) 

4. David L. Beckley (Rust College) 

Nominate 12 for General Conference to elect four 
(1fl517.2) 

six chief executive officers of U.M.-related educa- 
tional institutions: 

1. Ellen Hurwitz (Albnght) 

2. Roy Shilhng (Southwestern Univ.) 

3. Wesley Poling (Kentucky-Wesleyan) 

4. Douglas Lewis (Wesley) 

5. Ann Die (Hendnx College) 

6. Wanda Bigham (Huntington College) 

six holding other positions relevant to academic or 
financial affairs or church relationships 

1. David Maldonado (Perkins) 

2. Donald Messer (Hiff) 

3. John White (Nebraska-Wesleyan) 

4. Aubrey Lucas (Univ. Southern Mississippi) 

5. Dennis Campbell (Duke Divinity) 

6. Lovett Weems (St. Paul) 

TUDICIAL COUNCIL 
Nominate for an eight-year term: six clergy to fill 
two places and six laypersons to fill two places 
(112602) 

1. Clergy: John L. Topolewski (Wyoming) NE 

2. Clergy: Richard Cain (Cal-Pac) W 

3. Clergy: Kenneth Chalker (E OH) NC 

4. Clergy: Rex Bevins (NB) SC 

5. Clergy: John Collins (NY) NE 

6. Clergy: Jane Tews (Desert SW) W 

7. Lay: Jack Plowman (W PA) NE 

8. Lay: Hal Bonneyjr. (VA) SE 

9. Lay: Jon Gray (MO-W) SC 

10. Lay: Sally Curtis Askew (N GA) SE 

11. Lay: Anthony Danburain (Nigeria) CC 

12. Lay: Daniel K. Church (E OH) NC 



The Iluzija (Latvia) United Methodist Choir 




Corrections 

Bishop Victor Bonilla is a member of the Council 
of Bishops with voice but not vote. 

Add Bishop Robert M. Blackburn to the retired 
bishops' list. 

The Chancel Choir of Mountain View UMC, Boul- 
der, Colorado, Timothy Brown, director, was inad- 
vertently omitted from the worship bulletin and 
schedule of daily worship services. 

The city for Carolyn Marshall should be changed 
from Petersburg to Veedersburg, p. 47, col. 2, Wed. 
edition. 

P. 66, April 18. Change Lee-Wi Tan to Wee-Li Tan. 



Fifteen Bishops Express Pain 
at Lesbian, Gay 'Troscriptions" 

(UMNS) Personal "pain" at "proscrip- 
tions. ..against gay and lesbian persons" in official 
policies was voiced by 15 bishops in a dramatic state- 
ment released late yesterday. 

The bishops, 11 active and four retired, affirmed 
their commitment to "continue our responsibility to 
order and discipline of the church," but urged congre- 
gations "to open the doors in gracious hospitality to 
all our brothers and sisters in the faith." 

"We believe it is time to break the silence and state 
where we are on this issue that is hurting and silenc- 
ing countless faithful Christians," the statement said. 
Active bishops signing the statement were Judith 
Craig, William W. Dew Jr., Calvin D. McConnell. 
Susan M. Morrison, Fritz Mutti, Donald A. Ott, 
Sharon Zimmerman Rader, Roy I. Sano, Mary Ann 
Swenson, Melvin G. Talbert, and Joseph H. Yeakel. 
Retired bishops signing were Jesse R. DeWitt, 
Leonline T.C Kelly, Melvin G. Wheatley, and C. 
Dale White. 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No.. 



87 



Delegates Take Advantage 
of Translation Services 



As one walks through the convention center dunng 
General Conference, many languages can be heard. In 
fact, nine languages other than English, plus Amencaii 
Sign Language, are officially represented. 

In order to give the speakers of these languages as 
much active participation as possible, a team of 48 inter- 
preters and two on-site technicians are available to the 
approximately 141 delegates who requested interpreters. 
Interpreters are available to translate Chinese, French 
German, Indonesian, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Span- 
ish and Swahili The Rev. Laverle Carrington and several 
local volunteers translate American Sign Language 

Donald Reasoner, a missionary tor the General Board 
of Global Ministries, coordinates equipment for the trans- 
lators and serves as a Spanish and Portuguese translator. 
He said two systems are used to translate English into 
other languages. In the plenary sessions, an infrared 
system allows the individual to select a channel and listen 
on headphones to an interpreter, who sits in a booth at 
the front of the room. If a speaker needs translation, the 



interpreter translates the comment or question, which is 
then broadcast over the room's public-address system. 

The other interpretation system, which rehes on a 
portable headset, is used in the committees. Seven of the 
10 committees are served by interpreters Nilda Ferran, 
multilingual resources director for the General Board of 
Global Ministries, serves as General Conference lan- 
guage-interpretation coordinator. According to Ms. Fer- 
ran, all committee chairs support the effort to provide 
mterpretation for those who need it. 

Both Mr. Reasoner and Ms. Ferrari report relatively 
smooth sailing They said the few minor glitches they 
have encountered have been easily solved. This is the 
first General Conference which has provided interpreters 
for committee meetings and other uses beyond the ple- 
nary sessions. Mr. Reasoner and Ms. Ferrari credited 
their success to recent technological developments and 
increased awareness of the need for interpreters. 

— Marcy Barnes 



Luncheon Celebrates Latin American, 
Caribbean Ministries 

A luncheon yesterday honored Latin American and 
Caribbean delegates and the 34 annual conferences 
that have taken action in support of the missiona) 
initiative "Encounter with Christ in Latin Amenca 
and the Caribbean." 

Some 200 United Methodist bishops and delegates 
of the Council of Evangelical Methodist Churches of 
Latin American and the Caribbean (CIEMAL), Meth- 
odist Church of the Caribbean and the Americas 
(MCCA), representatives of the supporting 34 con- 
ferences, church executives and other special guests 
rejoiced in the response to this mission outreach 
program. 

"Encounter with Chnst" will hnk Methodist and 
United Methodist peoples of the Americas and the 
Caribbean in new dimensions of evangelism and mis- 
sion. This commitment to partnership and mutuality 
in mission, as we move into the 21st century, will be 
undergirded by "Encounter with Christ" (No. 
025100) through the General Board of Global Minis- 
tries. 



-?¥ BlcsseJ Be tUe Women: Be Counted! ??, 
Chairpersons of the 48 subcommittees: 



Female 


22 


Male 


26 


Lay 


22 


Clergy 


26 


Racial Ethnic Minority 


15 


YouthA'oung Adult 


1 



Observations in Legislative Committees: 

• Discipleship Com - Baptism Study Deliberation: 
Women are 30% of committee and made 12% of 
comments. Clergy are 49% of committee and 
made 87% of comments. 

• Local Church Subcom - Discussion 11260-270: 
Lay and clergy, male and female participation 
equivalent to their representation in the sub- 
committee. Blessed Be !!! 

• Church & Society Subcom - Discussion on 
Abortion: Men are 50%) of the group and made 
68% of the comments. 



provided by the General Comtnis 



1 the Status and Role of Women 



April 19, 1996 



Did You Know? 



The podium used by this General Conference was 
first used by Pope John Paul II during his 1993 visit 
to Denver. 

Joys and Concerns 

Our prayers are with Bishop William R. Cannon 
who fell and broke his hip April 17 while in attendance 
at General Conference. 

Bishop Arthur Kulah has opted to stay in Liberia to 
support church members during the violence. Libe- 
rian delegate Lamark Cox, who boarded one of the 
last U.S. hehcopters leaving the war-torn Afncan 
nation, was scheduled to arrive in Denver late yes- 
terday. He will hold a press conference at noon today 
in the Press Room (Ballroom 1). 



Attend Pastors' Schools across the 
nation 

for only $5.73 per month. 

Subscribe to the 

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Series, 



a monthly audio-cassette series 

composed of the top lectures from the 

best pastors' schools 

sponsored by annual conferences, 

seminaries, and 

continuing education centers. 

Call 1-800-672-1789 to subscribe. 



Special Events Offer 
Diverse Opportunities 

Whether you've set your weekend sights on 
Breckenridge, Cheyenne, the Colorado High Plains, 
Colorado Springs, Ihff School of Theology, Estes 
Park/Loveland or the Denver Metro Area, fun and 
adventure await you! 

Special Events Day, April 21, is designed to offer 
General Conference delegates and their families 
unique opportunities to get acquainted with the 
Rocky Mountain Conference "neighborhood"' the 
people, the churches and the attractions 

Hundreds of delegates and visitors have already 
signed up for the tours. In fact, Tour A (Brecken- 
ridge) and Tour F (Estes Park and Loveland) are 
booked solid. But don't despair, said Duane Knutson, 
a Special Events Planning Committee member and 
co-leader of the Colorado Spnngs tour. "There is 
added value in each of the tours. We're trying to offer 
visitors a choice beyond Denver Metro, trying to 
demonstrate hospitality wherever folks go." 

Delegates received a brochure describing the 
tours. Mr. Knutson, a member of First United Meth- 
odist Church, Colorado Springs, noted that the sec- 
ond Colorado Spring tour (Flying W Ranch) and the 
GreeleyAVeld County tour have been cancelled. 

Paula Johnston, Local Host Committee chair, 
urged persons to purchase tickets by noon Friday, 
April 19. The tours, departure/return times and 
costs are as follows: 

Tour A: Breckenridge, 7 a.m.-8 p.m., $33 

Tour B: Cheyenne, Wyo., 8 a.m.-8 p.m., $40 

Tour C: Colorado High Plains, 8 a.m. -7 p.m., $15 

Tour D: Colorado Springs (Tour 1), 8:30 a.m.-6 

p.m., $15 

Tour E: Iliff School of Theology, 9:30 a.m.-4:30 

p.m., $10 

Tour F: Estes Park and Loveland, 9 a.m. -7 p.m., 

$33.50 

Tour H: Denver Metro Area (various opportuni- 
ties), free 



Enjoy! 



-Barbara Dunlap-Berg 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No. 4 



Host Churches and Guest Preachers 



Alameda Heights 

Naboth Mandizvidza Muchopa, London 
Alger Memorial 

John Miller, Ludlow, Pa. 

Applewood Valley 
Moira Biggins, Great Britain 

Arvada 
Mary Elizabeth Moore, Claremont, Calif. 

Aspen Community 

Bishop Hermann Sticher, Nurtingen, 

Germany 
Bethany 

Olav Parnamets, Estonia 

Bethel 
Charles Yoost, Mansfield, Ohio 

Beulah 

Gereroso Ocampo, Bulacon, Philippines 
Brentwood 

Anthony Oglesby, Evansville, Ind. 
Brighton 

Bradley Watkins, Savoy, 111. 
Broomfield 

Maxie Dunham, Wilmore, Ky. 

Burlington 
Daniel Henry, Bolingbrook, 111. 

Bums Memorial, Aurora 

Bishop Ernest W. Newman, East Point, 

Ga. 
Calvary, Colorado Springs 

M.J. Kim, Ashland, Va. 

Christ 
John Horton, Macon, Ga. 

Columbine United 

Eva and Istvan Csernak, Hungary 
Community, Westcliffe 

James Porter, Fort Worth, Texas 
Deer Park 

Robert Kohler, Nashville, Tenn. 
Edgewater 

Reynaldo Gagno, Philippines 
Englewood 

Anita Iceman, Tucson, Ariz. 
Erie 

Jaime Potter-Miller, Johnstown, Pa. 
Faith 

Thomas Bickerton, Hurricane, W. Va. 
First, Berthoud 

Bob Coleman, Floyds Knobs, Ind. 
First, Casper, Wyo. 

Kabamba Munyangwe, Chingola, Zambia 
First, Cheyenne, Wyo. 

Bishop Dan Soloman, Oklahoma Area 
First, Fort Collins 

George Hunter, Wilmore, Ky. 
First, Fort Morgan 

William Scott III, Holly Springs, Miss. 



First, Golden 

Bishop Joseph Humper, West Africa 

(April 21) 

Michael Hahm, World Mission Global 

Ministry (April 28) 
First, Greeley 

J. LaVon Kincaid Sr., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
First, Lafayette 

Theodore Smith, Alexandria, Va. 
First, Laramie 

Edgar Coins, Louisville, Ky. 
First, Longmont 

Bishop Judith Craig, Ohio West Area 
First, Platteville 

Mary Ann Galloway, South Point, Ohio 
First, Pueblo 

Rodell Roberts, Jacksonville, Fla. 
First, Salt Lake City 

Tim Crawford, Frakes, Ky. 
First, Yuma 

Luther Milsaps, Tupelo, Miss. 
Flemming 

Miriam Barrera, Iligan City, Philippines 
Fowler/Manzanola 

Mike Weaver, Dumfries, Va. 
Genoa/Seibert 

Stanley G. Washington, Youngstown, 

Ohio 
Goode Centennial 

David Beckley, Holly Springs, Miss. 
Good Shepherd, Colorado Springs 

Carol Smith, Columbia. Mo. 
Good Shepherd, Thornton 

Fredrik Wegelius and Marcus Soder- 

strom, Finland 
Grant Avenue 

Guss J. Shelly, Senatobia, Miss. 
Green Mountain 

Bishop Ruediger Minor, Moscow, Russia 
Heritage, Littleton 

Jim W. Morris, Beverly, Ky. 
Holly 

Marion 0. Fitch, Lebanon, Ohio 
Hope 

Phillip Wogaman, Washington, D.C. 
Jefferson Avenue 

Kelly Clem, Rainbow City, Ala. 
Johnstown 

Alec Alvord, Charlotte, N.C. 
Lajunta 

J. Felton Jennings, Miami, Fla. 
Lakewood 

B. K. Bauknight, Bethel Park, Pa. 
Limon 

Carol Thompson 
Longs Peak 

Timothy Riss, Catskill, N.Y. 



Merritt Memorial 

Mutwale Ntambo, Kigoma, Tanzania 
Montclair 

Bishop Paul Granadosin, Philippines 
Mountain View Community 

Bishop Mack B. Stokes, Atlanta, Ga. 
Mountain View, Boulder 

Bishop Doloksaribu 
Mountain View, Woodland Park 

Bishop Walter Klaiber, Germany 

Niwot 
Vanessa Alers, Caguas, Puerto Rico 

Northglenn 

Bishop Denis Dutton, Malaysia 
North Park Community 

Peggy Johnson, Baltimore, Md. 
Park Hill 

Cornelius Henderson, Atlanta, Ga. 
Parker 

Bishop Bill Oden, Louisiana Area 
Peoples, Colorado Springs 

Gilbert Caldwell, New York 

First, Rocky Ford 
Mary Hicks Good, Sun Prairie, Wis. 

Simla/Ellcott 
Tarmo Lilleoja, Estonia 

Simpson 

Bob Hoshibata, Seattle, Wash. 
Smokey Hill 

Bishop Heinrich BoUeter, Zurich 

St. Paul 
David Richardson, Sylmar, Calif. 

St. Paul, Pueblo 
J. T. Phillips, Macon, Ga. 

Steamboat Springs 
Philip Amerson, Bloomington, Ind. 

Stratton/Kirk 
Bill Howie, Warhow, N.C. 

Sunrise 
Bishop Emerson Colaw, Dayton, Ohio 

Trinity, Colorado Springs 
Bishop Aldo Etchegoyen, Argentina 
(4/28) 
Daniel G. Nalbantski, Bulgaria 

Wheatland, Wyo. 

Eugene "Gene" Frazer, Columbus, Ohio 
University Park 

Randy Nugent, New York 

Valley Vista 
Jane Hull Harvey, Washington, D.C. 

Warren 
Bishop Roy C. Nichols, Oakland, Calif. 

Westminster 

Michael Brown, Asheville, N.C. 
Wiley-McClave 

William Hines, Findlay, Ohio 



Apnl 19. 1996 



Reports of Legislative Committees 



Church and Society — (4/18/96, 4:30 p.m.) 

The committee concurred with petitions: 
Substitutmg new text for Social Principles Para. 71 D 
on divorce, 

Adding a new Social Pnnciples paragraph on "Men and 
Women" after para. 71 E: 

Dealing with connectional relationships between the 
General Board of Church and Society (GBCS) 
conference, district, and local churches; membership 
on annual conference boards ot church and society; and 
the purpose and objectives of the GBCS. 

— Shanta M. Bryant and Lee Ranch 



Conferences — (4/17/96, 9 p.m.) 

The committee organized into subcommittees with the 
following chairs: Lucille Vanzant, J. La Von Kincaid Sr. 
Bruce Ough, and Paul Extrura-Femandez. 

The committee concurred with petitions: 

• Providing for The United Methodist Church to send 
two delegates annually to the British Methodist 
Conference and for The Methodist Church in Great 
Britain to send four delegates to The United Methodist 
General Conference. (21053, p. 175); 

• Changing the phrase, "persons with handicapping 
conditions" to "people with disabilities." (20309, p. 
193); 

The committee concurred with petitions (as amended): 

• Suggesting that annual conference and district 
meetings be held in places accessible to people with 
disabilities. (20368, p. 190) [NOTE: The committee 
deleted all of the guidelines.]; 

• Allowing annual conferences flexibility in structuring 
while providing for connectional relationships 
between local churches, distncts, conferences and 
general agencies, and while being responsible for 
monitoring inclusiveness in the conference. (21617, p. 
191) [NOTE: The committee deleted paragraph b)]: 

The committee nonconcurred with a petition: 

• Givmg the effective bishops membership and vote m 
the General Conference. (20556, p. 175) 

— Ken Horn and Carolyn Stmms 



Discipleship — (4/17/96, 4 p.m.) 

The committee concurred unanimously with the peti- 
tion to adopt the newly published Spanish-language hym- 
nal, Mtl Voces Para Cekbrar, as an official hymnal of the 
church. 



The committee formed tour subcommittees and ap- 
pointed a chair for each: 
Structure, (Aileen Williams, chair); 
Doctnne, (Duane Sarazin, chair); 
Laity/Youth, (Larry Powell Sr., chair); 
Baptism, (Greg Stover, chair). 

— Lmne DeMichele and Garlinda Burton 



Fincincial Administration — (4/18/96) 

The committee recommended concurrence 
Changing the name to General Board of Pension and 
Health Benefits from General Board of Pensions; 

Authorizing changing to new wording regarding legal 
entities of the Board of Pension and Health Benefits; 

Approving new language for permanent hinds, 

Replacing text of P1604 authorizing the activities of 
the General Board of Pension and Health Benefits; 

Updating language and placing a floor in the accepted 
level of annuity rates; 

Changing "clerg>'" to "churches" to reflect 
responsibihty of local churches to pay pensions; 

Revising the Basic Protection Plan; 

Deleting P2512; 

Changing language from "persons with handicapping 
conditions" to "people with disabilities"; 

Amending the Area Episcopal Residence Committee 
to allow other structures; 

The committee recommended non-concurrence: 
Funding of the General Board of Pension and Health 
Benefits; 

Expanding the options of the Health Flex Insurance 
Program to gays and lesbians; 

Inserting a preface to P2501: 

Adding mandatory consultation by churches with other 
Christian churches when seeking a building site; 

Reflecting the diversity' of the denomination in 
corporate body of trustees of church institutions; 

Mandating the annual conference or district board of 
trustees to conduct an energy audit; 

Pronibiting sale, lease, or mongage of annual 
conference property to benefit cuirent operating 
expenses of the conference or local churches; 

Asking for a task force to study salary equalization for 



Prohibiting mongage or sale of real property by a 
district board of trustees. 



Illy Edition Vol. 3 No.' 



91 



The committee referred to a general agency 

• To General Council on Finance and Administration a 
proposal to establish a relationship with a major credit 
card company. 

—Joretta Purdue, Ertk Aisgaard 

Global Ministries — (4/18/96) 

The committee recommended concurrence: 

• Supporting a permanent hind for mission work in Latin 
America and the Caribbean; 

• Urging participation in development and 
reconstruction work m Africa; 

• Calling for emergency assistance in rebuilding 
war-torn Liberia: 

• Supporting the peace process in Central America; 

• Deplonng the continued occupation of East Timor by 
Indonesia and the abuse of human nghts there; 

• Advocating work on peace and human rights efforts in 
the Middle East and North Africa, 

• Calling tor development of programs on conflict 
resolution and alternatives to violence; 

• Opposing the building of a radar station in Vieques, 
Puerto Rico, 

• Supporting removal of all U.S. military bases from 
Okinawa. 

— Linda Bloom 



Higher Education and Chaplaincy — (4/18/96) 

The committee organized into three subcommittees; 

Structural Relationships, (Stefanie Gray, chairj: 

University Senate and Seminaries, (Myron F. McCoy, 
chair); 

Chaplaincy and Miscellaneous. {Bradley F. Watktns, 
Sr.). 

The committee unanimously voted to accept the docu- 
ment ^^i^ca^jon.- The Gift of Hope and recommended that 
the General Conference urge every local congregation to 
study the document. 

The committee also recommended concurrence on the 
following: 

• DCA, volume 1, page 823, to amend par. 1511: 

• Number 21277 Standards for Endorsement for 
Ministry Settings. Amend the first sentence of oar. 
1511.^ 

• Number 21274. The Division of Chaplains and Related 
Minisines. Amend par. 1511.1. 

• Number 21276. General Oversight for Clergy 
Members. Amend the last sentence of par. 1511.2d 

• DCA. volume 1, page 821: Number 21662 pertaining 
to the Annual Conference Board of Higher Education 
and Campus Ministry. The committee rejected the 



deletion to Discipline paragraph 732. As a result, the 
committee then voted nonconcurrance with all other 
petitions dealing with the structure of the Annual 
Conference Board of Higher Education and Campus 
Ministry. 

The committee recommended nonconcurrence: 
Number 20631 to delete words World Service from 
first sentence of par. 1512; 

Number 21275 to change the language of par. 1511.2c; 

Number 20479 to eliminate the Annual Conference 
Board of Higher Education and Campus Ministry. 

— Terri Hkrs and Dawn Hand 



Independent Commissions — (4/18/96, 4:45 p.m.) 

The committee recommended concurrence: 
Affirming Commission on Status and Role of Women 
or similar structure at all levels of the church; 

Affirming the work of Gideons Inteniational but calling 
the organization to a more inclusive membership, 

Adding local church and annual conference to advocacy 
responsibilities of GCOSROW re: resolution of sexual 
harrassment issues, 

Affirming that tasks of currently-mandated 
Conference Commission on Archives and History 
must be carried out, but may be assigned to another 
structure than a commission. 

— Ann Whiting and Kristin Knudson Harris 



Local Church —(4/18/96, 3:30 p.m.) 

The committee recommended concurrence: 
Identifying children as well as men and women in a 
ministry concern that they be brought into a saving 
relationship with God; 

Inserting the word "who" into the sentence "The 
people of God, (who) are the church made visible in the 
A'orld . . ."; 

Specifying that United Methodist pastors are not 
employees of local churches, even though they may be 
so classified for taxation and other governmental 
entities; 

Defining clergy as deacons, elders, and local pastors 
under full and part-time appointment, and are licensed 
or ordained; 

Defining "cooperative ecumenical parish; 

Changing "persons with handicapping conditions" to 
'people with disabilities" in describing specialized 
areas of ministry; 

Changing term cooperative parish to "cooperative 
ministry" in section on churches in transitional 
communities. 



Apnl 19, 1996 



The committee recommended concurrence with 
amendment 

• Inserting a new section defining and outlining 
relationship between the annual conference and 
Ecumenical Shared Ministries. 

The committee recommended nonconcurrence 

• Calling tor rejection of "exaggerated efforts' at 
inclusjve language that deny ecumenical tnune 
teaching: 

• Calling for a quadrennial study commission on Classic 
Chnstianity and Modem Feminism. 

— Kathy Kruger Nobel and Rayford Woodnck 



Ordained and Diaconal Ministry — (4/18/96, 5 p.m.) 

The committee voted non-concurrence; 

with petitions 21751 (11116). 21757 (11201), and 21758 
(11201), all of which deal with the Lay Ministry Steward m 
the Ministry Study. They also dealt with petition 21750 
(11108) and concurred with an amended version which 
deleted references to the Lay Ministry Steward but re- 
tained language relating to ordained ministry. 

— Linda Green and Judy Smith 



How to Access General Conference 
Information Online 

Have you wondered how to access General Con- 
ference information online inside the convention cen- 
ter? Its easy, if you follow these directions. 

Sit at any Windows NT terminal. If the login 
screen is present, press CTRL-ALT-DEL. If "dele- 
gate" does not already appear in the usemame box, 
use the mouse to click in the usemame box. Erase 
the usemame and type "delegate." No password is 
required. Click on OK. You will then see a window 
called "General Conference," Inside that window^ 
double click on the Netscape icon. The General 
Conference WWW Pages will open automatically, and 
you can start browsing, 

Beyond the convention center you may access this 
information through United Methodist Information 
(http://www.umc.org/). From the United Methodist 
Information page, visitors can select "General Con- 
ference" to see the same information contained on 
our local web server, updated once daily. 



NowSigning 
in Auto^:aph Area 

Friday, April 1901 

Dorothy Jean Furnish 

12:30 - 1:30 

Adventures with the Bible 

Douglas Johnson 

12:30 - 1:30 

Don 't Know Much About Being a Leader 

Raquel Martinez 

12:30 - 1:30 

MIL VOCES (U.M. Spanish Hymnal) 

Will Willimon 

1:30 - 2:30 

Where Resident Aliens Live 

George Hunter 

1:30-2:30 

Church for the Unchurched 

James Thomas 

1:30-2:30 

Methodism Racial Dilemma 

Steve Harper 

1:00-2:30 

Devotional Life in Wesleyan Tradition 

Tom Oden 

12:30 - 1:30 

Requiem: a Lament in Three Movements 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No. 4 



Consent Calendar Explanation 

With this issue, the DCA begins the first calendar items. There are three consent calendars: A) concurrence with proposed 
changes to the Discipline. B) concurrence with petitions on non-Disciplinaiy matters. C) non-concurrence on Disciplinary and 
non-Disciplinary items. The first day items will be listed as 01. The second day will be listed 02, and so forth. Items can be placed 
on the consent calendar if: 1) no more than five votes were cast against the prevailing position; 2) it has no financial implications; 
3) the proposal does not require a constitutional amendment. Any five delegates may have a consent calendar item removed by 
having such a request on file with the secretary by 3 p.m. on the day it appears in the DCA. 



Consent Calendar AOl 



1-707.4 

Subject: Membership on Boards and 

Agencies 

Committee Item: CO7-707.4-C 
Petition: 

20309-CO-707.4-D, Pg. 193 
Membership: 86; Present: 82; 
For: 79; Against: 0; Not Voting: 3; 
Date: 4/17 
The Committee recommends concur- 



[ ] Nonconcurrence Date 



2-12.3 

Subject: United Methodist 

Delegates to Other Conferences 

Committee Item: C09-12.3-C 
Petition: 

21053-CO-12.3-C, Pg. 175 
Membership: 86; Present: 82; 
For: 82; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/17 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 



3-707 

Subject: Conference Agencies 

Committee Item: CO10-707-A 
Petition: 

21617-CO-707-D, Pg. 191 
Membership: 86; Present: 80; 
For: 79; Against: 0; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 4/17 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence as amended as follows: 

Delete all of Lb so that it ends with 
maintained in l.a. 

I I CiinLurTL-ncc 1 ] Nonconcurrc-nce Date / 



4-707 

Subject: .Accessibility in Annual 

Conference Boards and Agencies 

Committee Item: CO11-707-A 



Petition: 

20368-CO-707-D, Pg. 190 
Membership: 86; Present: 81; 
For: 78; Against: 3; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/17 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence as amended as follows: 

Insert a new sub-paragraph after cur- 
rent 11707.3 and renumber accordingly: 

AH Whenever possible meetings 
scheduled by the Annual Conference and 
its distncts, boards, or committees sbaW 
should be held in places which are acces- 
sible to persons with disabilities. Th e fol 
lowing ar e guid e lines as to what mak e s a 
plac e accessible: 

Architectural Guidelines 

a. All m ee ting rooms to b e us e d ar e 
accoaoiblo to those in whoolchnirs. Exam 
pie s of things which may make a room 
accosniblo: 

1) Evor>'thing IB at ground lovol with no 

2) An elevator is available. 

3) A ramp of size and maximum angle of 
1/12 that wheelchairs can negotiate is 



4) Door openings are at leant 36 inches 



5. Pews or chairs arc arranged to in 
elud e spac e for wh ee lchairs. 

b. Accessible washrooms. 

c. Convenient parking for those with 
disabilities. 



0. Adequate hand rails for safety. 
i. Adequate lighting, 
g. For ov e rnight meetings, acc e ssibl e 
lodging for participants. 
Communications Guidolinoo 

a. A loud sp e ak e r system. 

b. Sound e quipm e nt for th e mor e pro 
foundly hoanng impaired. 

I for the deaf. 



e . Programs and directions making uoo 
o f vi s uals, symbol s , imag e s, and sounds 
for persons who hav e difficulty communi 
inted or spoken word. 

[ 1 Nonconcurretice Date / 



5-728.3 

Subject: Church cujd Society's 
Responsibility for Criminal Justice 
and Mercy Ministry Concerns 

Committee Item: CS4-728.3-C 
Petition: 

22330-CS-728.3-D, Pg. 1230 
Membership: 101; Present: 94; 
For: 93; Against: 1; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 



6-728.1 

Subject: Annual Conference Board 

of Church and Society 

Committee Item: CS11-728.1-C 
Petition: 

2()935-CS-728.1-D,Pg. 126 
Membership: 101; Present: 96; 
For: 96; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 



d. Curb cuts if curbs must bo nogoti ' ' '-■""'•■' 



I Nonconcurrence Date 



d. L a rg e print program mntonals or tape 
recordings availnlile. 



/-1103 

Subject: Objectives 

Committee Item: CS16-1103-C 
Petition: 

209.38-CS-1103-D,Pg. 127 
Membership: 101; Present: 95; 
For: 91; Against: 4; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 



1 Concu 



1 NoiKoncufTcncc Dale 



April 19, 1996 



8-1102 

Subject: The purpose of the Board 

of Church and Society 

Committee Item: CS18-1102-C 
Petition: 
20937-CS-1102-D. Pg. 126 
Membership: 101; Present: 94; 
For: 94; Against; 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends concur- 



[ ) Concurrence [ 1 Nonconcurrence Dale 



12-1511.2 

Subject: General Oversight for 
Clergy Members 

Committee Item: HE29-1511.2-C 
Petition: 

21276-HE-1511.2-D, Pg. 823 
Membership: 88; Present: 76; 
For: 75; Against: 1; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

[ 1 Concurrence [ ] Nonconcurrence Dale / 



There way shall be in each Annual 
Conference a conference Commission on 
the Small Membership Church^ or the 
responsibilities of the Small Member- 
ship Church Commission may be as- 
signed to an existing or newly created 
multi functional agency of the council 
or alternative structure that cares for 
the functions of support, nurture, and 
growth of small membership 
churches and their relationships to 
the conference, districts, and other 
local churches. 



1 Concurrence [ ] Nonconcu 



Dale 



9-1107 

Subject: Vacancies 

Committee Item: CS77-1107-C 
Petition: 

20941-CS-1107-D, Pg. 128 
Membership: 101; Present: 94; 
For: 88; Against: 4; Not Voting: 2; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 



13 741 

Subject: Conference Commission on 
the Status and Role of Women 

Committee Item: IC1-741-C 
Petition: 

21667-IC-741-D,Pg.905 
Membership: 74; Present: 68; 
For: 63; Against: 0; Not Voting: 5; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 



16 105 

Subject: The General Ministry of All 
Christian Believers 

Committee Item: LC1-105-C 
Petition: 

21639-LC-105-D,Pg.942 
Membership: 91; Present: 71; 
For: 71; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends concur- 



[ ] Concurrence [ J Nonconcurrence Dale / 



1 Concurrence [ ] Nonconcurrence Dale 



10-1511.1 

Subject: The Division of Chaplains 
and Related Ministries 

Committee Item: HE13-1511.1-C 
Petition: 

21274-HE-1511.1-D,Pg.823 
Membership: 88; Present: 78; 
For: 78; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

( ] Concurrence ( ] Nonconcurrence Dale / 



14-2203 

Subject: Responsibility of the 
General Commission on the Status 
and Role of Women 

Committee Item: IC8-2203-C 
Petition: 

20849-IC-2203-D, Pg. 912 
Membership: 74; Present: 67; 
For: 66; Against: 1; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 



17-107 

Subject: The General Ministry of All 

Christian Believers 

Committee Item: LC3-107-C 
Petition: 

21640-LC-107-D,Pg.943 
Membership: 91; Present: 71; 
For: 70; Against: 1; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

1 ) Concurrence [ ] Nonconcurrence Dale / 



11-1511.2 

Subject: Standards for 

Endorsements for Ministry Settings 

Committee Item: HE14-1511.2-C 
Petition: 

21277-HE-1511.2-D,Pg.823 
Membership: 88; Present: 79; 
For: 79; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 



15-742 

Subject: Commission on Small 

Membership Church 

Committee Item: IC78-742-A 
Petition: 

22019-IC-742-D, Pg. 1386 
Membership: 74; Present: 67; 
For: 54; Against: 4; Not Voting: 9; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence as amended as follows: 



18 114 

Subject: Employment Status of 
Clergy 

Committee Item: LC6-114-C 
Petition: 

21595-LC-114-D.Pg.943 
Membership: 91; Present: 71; 
For: 70; Against: 1; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No. 4 



19ll4 

Subject: Definition of Clergy 

Committee Item: LC7-114-C 
Petition: 

22673-LC-114-D. Pg. 1405 
Membership: 91; Present: 71; 
For: 69; Against: 1; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

[ ] Concurrence [ ) Nonconcurrence Dale / 



20-206.3 

Subject: Ecumenical Parish 

Committee Item: LC8-206.3-C 
Petition: 
21082-LC-206.3-D, Pg. 944 
Membership: 91; Present: 71; 
For: 67; Against: 1; Not Voting: 3; 



The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 



21-207 

Subject: Ecumenical Shared 

Ministries 

Committee Item: LC9-207-A 
Petition: 

21083-LC-207-D,Pg.945 
Membership: 91; Present: 69; 
For: 66; Against: 2; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence as amended as follows: Insert , 
P248.1"followingP244"inl2thlineofthe 
third paragraph. 



[ ] Concurrence [ ) Nonco 



22-207.5 

Subject: Churches in Transitional 

Communities 



Committee Item: LC10-207.5-C 
Petition: 

22106-LC-207.5-D, Pg. 1406 
Membership: 91; Present: 70; 
For: 67; Against: 1; Not Voting: 2; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 



23-260 

Subject: Age-Level, Family, and 

Specialized-Ministries Coordinators 

Committee Item: LC11-260-C 
Petition: 

20331-LC-260-D,Pg.959 
Membership: 91; Present: 71; 
For: 71; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

[ J Concurrence [ ] Nonconcurrence Dale / 



Consent Calendar BOl 



24-NonDis 

Subject: Continuation of the Eurasia 

Episcopal Area 

Committee Item: CCl-NonDis-C 
Petition: 

21727-CC-NonDis-O, Pg. 1106 
Membership: 36; Present: 29; 
For: 21; Against: 0; Not Voting: 8; 
Date: 4/15 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

[ ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Dale / 



25-NonDis 

Subject: Zaire to Become a Central 

Conference 

Committee Item: CC3-NonDis-C 
Petition: 

22013-CC-NonDis-O, Pg. 1210 
Membership: 36; Present: 29; 
For: 22; Against: 0; Not Voting: 7; 
Date: 4/17 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

I I Concurrence 1 | Nonconcurrence Dale / 



26-NonDis 

Subject: By Water and The Spirit: A 

United Methodist Understanding of 

Baptism 

Committee Item: DIl-NonDis-A 
Petition: 

21464-DI-NonDis-O, Pg. 227 
Membership: 110; Present: 100; 
For: 100; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/17 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence as amended as follows: 

Paragraph 2 under Baptism and Holy 
Living amended to read: 

Baptism is the doorway to the sanctified 
life. The sacrament teaches us to live in 
the expectation of further gifts of Gods 
grace. It initiates us into a community of 
faith that prays for holiness; it calls us to 
life lived in faithfulness to Gods gift. Bap- 
tized believers and the community of faith 
are obligated to manifest to the world the 
new redeemed humanity which lives in 
loving relationship with God and strives 
to put an end to all human estrangements. 
There are no conditions of human life (+h- 
cluding a g o or intolloctunl nhility. race or 
nationality, gender or '.K'xunl idontity. 
class or handicapping conditions) that ex- 
clude persons from the sacrament of bap- 
tism. We strive for and look forward to the 



reign of God on earth, of which baptism is 
a sign. Baptism is fulfilled only when the 
believer and the church are wholly con- 
formed to the image of Christ. 

I I Concurrence ( ] Nonconcurrence Dale / 



27-NonDis 

Subject: Support for the Approval of 

"By Water and the Spirit" 

Committee Item: DI2-NonDis-C 
Petition: 

22822-DI-NonDis-O, Pg. 1306 
Membership: 110; Present: 100; 
For: 100; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/17 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 



^O-NonDis 

Subject: Adoption of the Spanish 

Language Hymnal, Mil Voces Para 

Celebrar 

Committee Item: D14-NonDis-C 
Petition: 

21465-DI-NonDis-O, Pg. 265 
Membership: 110; Present: 101; 



96 



April 19, 1996 



For: 101; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/19 



The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 



[ ) Concurrente [ ] Nonconcurrence Da 



29-R557 

Subject: God's Shalom for the 

People of Central America 

Committee Item: GM4-R557-C 
Petition: 

21354-GM-R557-U, Pg. 808 
Membership: 116; Present: 115; 
For: 115; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

[ ) Concurrence [ ] Nonconcurrence Date / 



30-NonDis 

Subject: In Opposition of Building a 
Radar in the Lajas Valley and the 
Town of Vieques, Puerto Rico 

Committee Item: GM6-NonDis-C 
Petition: 

22711-GM-NonDis-O, Pg. 1371 
Membership: 116; Present: 114; 
For: 112; Against: 1; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

[ ] Concurrence [ ] Nont 



31-NonDis 

Subject: The Church's Response to 

Ethnic and Religious Conflict 

Committee Item: GMU-NonDis-C 
Petition: 
22489-GM-NonDis-O, Pg. 1367 



Membership: 116; Present: 115; 
For: 115; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

[ ] Concurrence ( ] Nonconcurrence Date / 



O^-NonDis 

Subject: Education: The Gift of 

Hope 

Committee Item: HE23-NonDis-C 
Petition: 

21128-HE-NonDis-0,Pg.825 
Membership: 88; Present: 82; 
For: 82; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 



Consent Calendar COl 



OO-NonDis 

Subject: Episcopal Oversight in the 

Commonwealth of Independent 

States 

Committee Item: CC2-NonDis-N 
Petition: 

23023-CC-NonDis-O, Pg. 1210 
Membership: 36; Present: 29; 
For: 29; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/15 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 



34-12.1 

Subject: Effective Bishops as 
Members of General Conference 

Committee Item: C02-12.1-N 
Petition: 

20556-CO-12.1-C, Pg. 175 
Membership: 86; Present: 79; 
For: 74; Against: 2; Not Voting: 3; 
Date: 4/17 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 

I 1 Concurrence ( j Nonconcurrence Date / 



35 12 

Subject: Composition of General 



Committee Item: C03-12-N 
Petition: 

22154-CO-12-C, Pg. 1258 
Membership: 86; Present: 82; 
For: 81; Against: 0; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 4/17 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 

[ ) Concurrence [ ] Nonconcurrence Dale / 



36i3 

Subject: Meeting of the General 
Conference 

Committee Item: C04-13-N 
Petition: 

20778-CO-13-C, Pg. 1258 
Membership: 86; Present: 82; 
For: 77; Against: 4; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 4/17 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 

[ 1 Concurrence 1 1 Nonconcurrence Dale / 



37i3 

Subject: Meeting of General 
Conference 

Committee Item: C05-13-N 
Petition: 

2()4()7-CO-13-C, Pg. 175 
Membership: 86; Present: 82; 



For: 80; Against: 1; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 4/17 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 

[ ] Concurrence [ ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



38-603 

Subject: Presiding Officers of 

General Conference 

Committee Item: CO6-603-N 
Petition: 

22735-CO-603-D, Pg. 1262 
Membership: 86; Present: 82; 
For: 80; Against: 0; Not Voting: 2; 
Date: 4/17 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 



39-15.10 

Subject: Amendment to the 
Constitution 

Committee Item: CO12-15.10-N 
Petition: 

20197-CO-15.10-C,Pg. 175 
Membership: 86; Present: 78; 
For: 77; Against: 1; Not Voting: 0; 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No. 4 



Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 

( ] Concurrcnce [ ] Nonconcurrence Date / 



For: 78; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 



For: 78; Agamst: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 

[ 1 Concurrence ( ] Nonconcurrence Date / 



40-701 

Subject: The Purpose of the Annual 
Conference 

Committee Item: CO13-701-N 
Petition: 

20473-CO-701-D, Pg. 185 
Membership: 86; Present: 78; 
For: 75; Against: 1; Not Voting: 2; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 

1 ] Nonconcuirence Date / 



44-707.1 

Subject: Conference Agencies 

Committee Item: CO17-707.1-N 
Petition: 

20052-CO-707.1-D,Pg. 191 
Membership: 86; Present: 78; 
For: 78; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/18 
The Committee recommends Noncon- 



[ ] Concurrence [ ] Nonconcurrence Date / 



48-707.1 

Subject: Responsibilities of the 

Annual Conference 

Committee Item: CO21-707.1-N 
Petition: 

20474-CO-707.1-D, Pg. 192 
Membership: 86; Present: 78; 
For: 78; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 

[ ] Concurrence ( ] Noncoi 



41-707 

Subject: Conference Agencies 

Committee Item: CO14-707-N 
Petition: 

20191-CO-707-D, Pg. 190 
Membership: 86; Present: 78; 
For: 78; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. . 

[ 1 Concurrence ( ] Nonconcurrence Date / 



45-707.1 

Subject: Mandated structures 

provided by Annual Conference 

Committee Item: CO18-707.1-N 
Petition: 

20187-CO-707.1-D, Pg. 191 
Membership: 86; Present: 78; 
For: 78; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 

[ ] Concurrence [ ] Nonconcurrence Date / 



49i4 

Subject: The Responsibility of 
General Conference 

Committee Item: C022-14-N 
Petition: 

20779-CO-14-C. Pg. 1258 
Membership: 86; Present: 77; 
For: 76; Agamst: 1; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 

[ 1 Concurrence [ ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



42-707 

Subject: The Structure of Annual 

Conference 

Committee Item: CO15-707-N 
Petition: 

20489-CO-707-D, Pg. 190 
Membership: 86; Present: 78; 
For: 78; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 

[ 1 Concurrence [ ] Nonconcurrence Date / 



46-707.1 

Subject: Conference Agencies 

Committee Item: CO19-707.1-N 
Petition: 

20429-CO-707.1-D, Pg. 192 
Membership: 86; Present: 78; 
For: 78; .'\gainst: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 

[ 1 Concurrence ( 1 Nonconcurrence Date / 



50-728.2 

Subject: Membership of the Board 

of Church and Society 

Committee Item: CS12-728.2-N 
Petition: 

20444-CS-728.2-D, Pg. 126 
Membership: 101; Present: 94; 
For: 94; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 



[ ] Concurrence ( ) Nonconci 



43-707 

Subject: Connectional Relationships 

Committee Item: CO16-707-N 
Petition: 

20.565-CO-707-D, Pg. 191 
Membership: 86; Present: 78; 



47-707 

Subject: Connectional relationship 

Committee Item: CO20-707-N 
Petition: 

20428-CO-707-D, Pg. 190 
Membership: 86; Present: 78; 



51-753 

Subject: Eliminate District Director 

of and Committee on Church and 

Society 

Committee Item: CS15-753-N 
Petition: 

20555-CS-753-D. Pg. 126 
Membership: 101; Present: 92; 



April 19, 1996 



For: 89; Against: 1; Not Voting: 2; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 



52-728.1- 

Subject: Board of Church and 

Society 

Committee Item: CS21-728.1-N 
Petitions: 

20008-CS-728-D, Pg. 125; 

20009-CS-728-D, Pg. 125; 

20443-CS-728.1-D. Pg. 126; 

20472-CS-728-D, Pg. 126; 

21632-CS-728.1-D, Pg. 126; 

22329-CS-728-D, Pg. 1230 
Membership: 101; Present: 95; 
For: 95; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 

[ ] Concurrence [ ] Nonconcurrence Date / 



53-1103 

Subject: The Objectives of the 
General Board of Church and 
Society 

Committee Item: CS62-1103-N 
Petitions: 

22543-CS- 1103-D, Pg. 1231; 

22725-CS-1103-D, Pg. 1231 
Membership: 101; Present: 94; 
For: 91; Against: 2; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 



54-1109 

Subject: Membership of the 

Executive Committee of the 

General Board of Church and 

Society 

Committee Item: CS74-1109-N 

Petition: 

22546-CS-1109-D, Pg. 1233 
Membership: 101; Present: 88; 
For: 86; Against: 0; Not Voting: 2; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 



55-1104 

Subject: Responsibilities of the 

Genera] Board of Church and 

Society 

Committee Item: CS81-1104-N 
Petition: 

22334-CS-1104-D, Pg. 1232 
Membership: 101; Present: 94; 
For: 88; Against: 5; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 

[ ] Concurrence [ 1 Nonconcurrence Date / 



56-NonDis 
Subject: Baptism 

Committee Item: DI3-NonDis-N 
Petitions: 

20110-DI-NonDis-O, Pg. 260; 

20111-DI-NonDis-O$, Pg. 260; 

20250-DI-NonDis-O, Pg. 261; 

20786-DI-NonDis-O, Pg. 1286; 

21055-DI-NonDis-O, Pg. 264; 

22216-DI-NonDis-O, Pg. 1294; 

22558-DI-NonDis-O, Pg. 1302; 

22629-DI-NonDis-O, Pg. 1303; 

22866-DI-NonDis-O, Pg. 1306; 

22868-DI-NonDis-O, Pg. 1307 
Membership: 110; Present: 100; 
For: 100; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/17 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 

( ] Concurrence [ ] Nonconcurrence Date / 



57-810.3 

Subject: Eligibility for Election to 

General Agencies 

Committee Item: GJ1-810.3-R 
Petition: 

22477-GJ-810.3-D, Pg. 1329 
Membership: 97; Present: 93; 
For: 93; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/17 

The Committee recommends referral 
to Judicial Council. 



[ ] Concurrence [ ] Nonconcu 



58-NonDis 

Subject: Concern for North Korea 

Committee Item: GM3-NonDis-N 
Petition: 

22644-GM-NonDis-O, Pg. 1369 
Membership: 116; Present: 114; 
For: 113; Against: 0; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 4/18 



The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 



1 1 Concurrence ( 1 Nonconcu 



59-732 

Subject: Eliminate Annual 
Conference Board of Higher 
Education and Campus Ministry 

Committee Item: HE10-732-N 
Petition: 

20479-HE-732-D, Pg. 821 
Membership: 88; Present: 75; 
For: 75; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 

[ 1 Concurrence [ I Nonconcurrence Date / 



60-1511.2 

Subject: Endorsement of Ordained 

Ministry 

Committee Item: HE30-1511.2-N 
Petition: 

21275-HE-1511.2-D,Pg.823 
Membership: 88; Present: 77; 
For: 77; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 



61-NonDis 

Subject: Policy of the Division of 

Chaplains and Related Ministries 

Committee Item: HE32-NonDis-N 
Petition: 

22789-HE-NonDis-O, Pg. 1384 
Membership: 88; Present: 79; 
For: 79; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 

[ ] Concurrence { ] Nonconcurrence Date / 



62741 

Subject: Conference Commission on 
the Status and Role of Women 

Committee Item: IC2-741-N 
Petition: 

22715-IC-741-D, Pg. 1385 
Membership: 74; Present: 68; 
For: 64; Against: 2; Not Voting: 2; 
Date: 4/18 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No. 4 



99 



The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 



[ ] Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date 



63741 

Subject: Conference Commission on 
the Status and Role of Women 

Committee Item: IC3-741-N 
Petitions: 

20089-IC-741-D, Pg. 904; 

20464-IC-741-D, Pg. 904; 

20510-IC-741-D, Pg. 905; 

22018-IC-741-D, Pg. 1385 
Membership: 74; Present: 67; 
For: 66; Against: 1; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 

[ ] Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Dale / 



For: 60; Against: 0; Not Voting: 7; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 

[ J Concurrence [ ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



67-1802 

Subject: Incorporation of the 
General Commission on Archives 
and History 

Committee Item: IC36-1802-N 
Petition: 

22791-IC-1802-D, Pg. 1386 
Membership: 74; Present: 67; 
For: 60; Against: 0; Not Voting: 7; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 

( ) Concurrence [ ] Nonconcurrence Date / 



For: 60; Against: 0; Not Voting: 7; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 



71-1807 

Subject: Staff of the General 

Commission on Archives and History 

Committee Item: IC40-1807-N 
Petition: 

22796-IC-1807-D, Pg. 1386 
Membership: 74; Present: 67; 
For: 60; Against: 0; Not Voting: 7; 
Date: 4/18 
The Committee recommends Noncon- 



[ ] Concurrence [ ] Nonconcurrence Date 



64-741.3 

Subject: Chairperson of the 
Commission on the Status and Role 
of Women 

Committee Item: IC6-741.3-N 
Petition: 

20466-IC-741.3-D. Pg. 905 
Membership: 74; Present: 67; 
For: 66; Against: 1; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 

[ 1 Concurrence [ | Nonconcurrence Dale / 



65-2201 

Subject: Name 

Committee Item: IC9-2201-N 
Petition: 

22807-IC-2201-D, Pg. 1389 
Membership: 74; Present: 67; 
For: 65; Against: 0; Not Voting: 2; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 

[ ] Concurrence [ ] Nonconcurrence Date / 



68-1803 

Subject: Purpose of the General 

Commission on Archives and History 

Committee Item: IC37-1803-N 
Petition: 

22792-IC-1803-D, Pg. 1386 
Membership: 74; Present: 67; 
For: 60; Against: 0; Not Voting: 7; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 

[ ] Concurrence [ ] Nonconcurrence Dale / 



69-1805 

Subject: Meetings of the General 

Commission 

Committee Item: IC38-1805-N 
Petition: 

22794-IC-1805-D, Pg. 1386 
Membership: 74; Present: 67; 
For: 60; Against: 0; Not Voting: 7; 
Date: 4/18 
The Committee recommends Noncon- 



72-1808 

Subject: Executive Committee 

Committee Item: IC41-1808-N 
Petition: 

22797-IC-1808-D, Pg. 1386 
Membership: 74; Present: 67; 
For: 60; Against: 0; Not Voting: 7; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 

[ ) Concurrence [ ] Nonconcurrence Date / 



73-1809 

Subject: Finances of the General 
Commission on Archives And 
History 

Committee Item: IC42-1809-N 
Petition: 

22798-IC-1809-D, Pg. 1386 
Membership: 74; Present: 67; 
For: 60; Against: 0; Not Voting: 7; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 

[ 1 Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



66-1801 

Subject: General Commission on 
Archives and History 

Committee Item: IC35-1801-N 
Petition: 

22790-IC-1801-D, Pg. 1386 
Membership: 74; Present: 67; 



70-1806 

Subject: Officers of the General 

Commission 

Committee Item: IC39-1806-N 
Petition: 

22795-IC-1806-D, Pg. 1386 
Membership: 74; Present: 67; 



74-1810 

Subject: Historical Society 

Committee Item: IC43-1810-N 
Petition: 

22799-IC-1810-D, Pg. 1387 
Membership: 74; Present: 67; 
For: 60; Against: 0; Not Voting: 7; 
Date: 4/18 



April 19, 1996 



The Committee recommends Noncon- The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. currence. 



1 Concurrence [ 1 Nonconcu 



[ ] Concurrence [ ] Nonconcurrence Dale 



The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 



[ 1 Concurrence [ ] Nonconcurrence Dale 



75-1811 

Subject: Archival Definitions 

Committee Item: IC44-1811-N 
Petition: 

22800-IC-1811-D, Pg. 1387 
Membership: 74; Present: 67; 
For: 60; Against: 0; Not Voting: 7; 
Date: 4/18 



76-107 

Subject: Identifjing the Primary- 
Purpose of the Church and its 
Ministry 

Committee Item: LC2-107-N 
Petition: 

22104-LC-107-D. Pg. 1405 
Membership: 91: Present: 71; 
For: 68; Agamst: 1; Not Votmg: 2; 
Date: 4/18 



77-11,. 

Subject: A Study Commission on 
Classic Christianity cind .Modem 
Feminism: The Future of their 
Relationship 

Committee Item: LC4-113-N$ 
Petition: 
22672-LC-113-D$, Pg. 1405 
Membership: 91; Present: 71; 
For: 67; Against: 3; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 

( ] Concurrence [ ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



Calendar Items 



78-601 

Subject: The Mission of the Church 

Committee Item: CO1-601-N 
Petition: 

20201-CO-601-D, Pg. 178 
Membership: 86; Present: 73; 
For: 45; Against: 15; Not Voting: 13; 
Date: 4/17 
The Committee recommends Noncon- 



currence. 



[ ] Concurrence [ ] Nonconcurrence Date 



79-707.1 

Subject: Conference Agencies 

Committee Item: CO8-707.1-N 
Petition: 

20755-CO-707.i-D. Pg. 192 
Membership: 86; Present: 82; 
For: 71; Against: 9; Not Voting: 2; 
Date: 4/17 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 

[ 1 Concurrence [ ] Nonconcurrence Date / 



80-728.4 

Subject: Annual Conference Board 

of Church and Society 

Responsibilities 

Committee Item: CS14-728.4-N 
Petition: 

22331-CS-728.4-D. Pg. 1230 
Membership: 101; Present: 93; 



For: 87; Against: 6; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 



81-1104 

Subject: The Responsibilities of the 

General Board of Church and 

Society 

Committee Item: CS58-1104-N 
Petition: 

22332-CS-1104-D, Pg. 1231 
Membership: 101; Present: 94; 
For: 77; Against: 15; Not Voting: 2; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 



[ 1 Concu 



] Nonconcurrence Date / 



82-1104 

Subject: The Responsibilities of the 
General Board of Church and 
Society 

Committee Item: CS59-1104-N 
Petition: 

22333-CS-1104-D, Pg. 1231 
Membership: 101; Present: 94; 
For: 79; Against: 12; Not Voting: 3; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 



I ] Concurrence ( ] Nonconcurrence Date / 



83-1109 

Subject: Executive Committee 

Committee Item: CS75-1109-C 
Petition: 

20943-CS-1109-D, Pg. 128 
Membership: 101; Present: 90; 
For: 83; Against: 7; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/18 
The Committee recommends concur- 



] Concurrence [ ] Nonconcurren 



84-1108 

Subject: Officers 

Committee Item: CS76-1108-C 
Petition: 

20942-CS-1108-D, Pg. 128 
Membership: 101; Present: 91; 
For: 82; Against: 6; Not Voting: 3; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

[ 1 Concurrence ( ] Nonconcurrence Date / 



85-1104 

Subject: Responsibilities of the 
General Board of Church and 
Society 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No. 4 



Committee Item: CS79-11()4-N 
Petition: 

22726-CS-1104-D, Pg. 1232 
Membership: 101; Present: 93; 
For: 83; Against: 7; Not Voting: 3; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 



86-1104 

Subject: Responsibilities of the 

General Board of Church and 

Society 

Committee Item: CS80-1104-N 
Petition: 

22335-CS-1104-D, Pg. 1232 
Membership: 101; Present: 94; 
For: 72; .'\gainst: 17; Not Voting: 5; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 



88 741 

Subject: Eliminate Annual 
Conference Commission on the 
Status and Role of Women 

Committee Item: IC4-741-N 
Petition: 

20483-IC-741-D, Pg. 904 
Membership: 74; Present: 67; 
For: 58; Against: 6; Not Voting: 3; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 

I ] Concurrence [ ] Nonconcurrence Dale / 



89-741.2 

Subject: Commission on the Status 

and Role of Women 

Committee Item: IC5-741.2-N 
Petitions: 

20381-IC-741.2-D,Pg.905; 

20465-IC-741.2-D, Pg. 905 
Membership: 74; Present: 67; 
For: 50; Against: 8; Not Voting: 9; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 



The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 



91 



-NonDis 

Subject: Membership of Gideons 
International 

Committee Item: IC25-NonDis-A 
Petition: 

21557-IC-NonDis-O, Pg. 1391 
Membership: 74; Present: 67; 
For: 38; Against: 23; Not Voting: 6; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence as amended as follows: 

Text reads as printed in the Advance 
DCA except for the final paragraph which 
is amended as follows: 

Therefore, be it resolved, that the Gen- 
eral Conference of The United Methodist 
Church and its member congregations 
strongly encourage Gideons International 
to open their membership to all Chris- 
tians, regardless of sex-gender, socio- 
economic class, or denominational 
background. 



87-1S12 

Subject: Funding of Division of 

Chaplains and Related Ministries 

Committee Item: HE31-1512-N 
Petition: 

20631-HE-1512-D, Pg. 823 
Membership: 88; Present: 79; 
For: 49; Against: 28; Not Voting: 2; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 



[ ] Concurrence [ ] Nonconcurrence Date 



90-2203.7 

Subject: Advocacy role of the 
General Commission on the Status 
and Role of Women 

Committee Item: IC7-2203.7-C 
Petition: 

20850-IC-2203.7-D, Pg. 913 
Membership: 74; Present: 67; 
For: 35; Against: 32; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/18 



92-113 

Subject: Regarding Triune and 
Inclusive Language 

Committee Item: LC5-113-N 
Petition: 

22671-LC-113-D,Pg. 1405 
Membership: 91; Present: 71; 
For: 62; Against: 7; Not Voting: 2; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends Noncon- 
currence. 



( 1 Co 



[ 1 Nonconcurrence Date 



102 



April 19, 1996 



Proceedings of the 1996 General Conference 
of The United Methodist Church 



Committee On Journal Report 



The Committee On Journal 
hereby certifies as accurate, with 
the following corrections, the pro- 
ceedings as printed in the Daily 
Christian Advocate for Wednesday, 
April 17, 1996. 

Daily Edition, page 4, column 1, 
Cashar Evans Jr. was mispelled. 

The Committee On Journal 
hereby certifies as accurate, with 
the following corrections, the pro- 
ceedings as pnnted m the Daily 



Christian Advocate tor Wednesday, 
April 18, 1996. 

Daily Editum, page 60, column 1, 
"Delegates Approve Changes," line 
18 should read "General Confer- 
ence of 2000 rather than 1996." 

Daily Edition, page 71, column 3, 
first paragraph, "Michael Pointer" 
should read "Michael Coyner." 

William Reasner 
Chair, Committee on Journal 

(C13,3eat2) 



(Continued from page 79) 
Wednesday Morning Announcements 

BISHOP KNOX: Thank you very 
much. Now let's hear from our confer- 
ence secretary. She has several an- 
nouncements. 

CAROLYN MARSHALL: During 
the worship service this morning, the 
mention of the McCurdy Choir sing- 
ing this afternoon at two o'clock here 
prior to a plenary session was made. 
There will not be a plenary session 
here, but I know that the members of 
the choir would be very happy and 
pleased if any of you who are available 
at two o'clock could be present in 
order to hear them 

Those persons who were elected 
chairs and other elected officers of 
legislative committees, as you organ- 
ize and find a need for particular other 
space as far as sub-committees arc 
concerned, as well as other materials, 
you are requested to go to the busi- 
ness manager, and his office is in A206 
in order to receive those other loca- 
tions which you may use. 

As we move from this place to one 
of those 25 randomly selected groups 
for rcflcrtioii and dialogue, I want to 



mention to you that among the per- 
sons who are here from the British 
Methodist Church is Moira Biggins, 
who is a member of their committee 
which is now working on revising the 
fonnat for their annual conference. 
And they are in the process of devel- 
oping a process very similar to that 
which we are using now, and are very 
appreciative of being here. She will be 
joining the group of compilers as a 
time of personal privilege, and a time 
of shanng with one of our other de- 
nominations fi-om the British Meth- 
odist Church as they meet. 

Then also to tell you that some of 
you have been wondenng about a 
break. There are cookies and coffee 
for you. Please pick them up and en- 
deavor, as much as possible, to be in 
your small groups by 10:45, as soon 
following that schedule as closely as 
possible. You did have on your desks 
this morning a blue sheet which de- 
lineated the places where all of those 
small groups would be meeting. 

BISHOP KNOX: Thank you. Go in 
peace, and may the peace of God be 
with you. Amen. 



Morning Session 
April 18, 1996 

Bisliop Donald A. Ott, presiding 
(Prayer and Song) 

BISHOP DONALD A. OTT: I 
would like to give you directions for a 
time of conversation. You will want 
and need to hear them. Will you 
please come to order? First a word to 
let you know that the choir from 
Gainesville. Florida, you heard this 
morning will be giving a concert in the 
lobby of the Grand Ballroom at 2:00 
p.m., a good opportunity before legis- 
lative committees. 

Now, before the order of the day, I 
want to call your attention to a state- 
ment in the episcopal address of our 
first evening together. In that ad- 
dress, the Council of Bishops asked 
for all meetings to begin with conver- 
sation and prayer. We arc going to 
begin today with a five minute time for 
such conversation and prayer. In a 
moment, I will read to you the two 
sentences from the episcopal address 
and ask that you immediately after 
hearing them begin that conversation 
with a person near you. Perhaps with 
one in front or behind you to increase 
the possibility that it is someone you 
know less well. You may even wish to 
stand to converse for those few min- 
utes. After tour minutes, I will ask you 
to take the last minute to pray to- 
gether in the way that is appropriate 
to you and your conversation partner. 
I will offer the amen for all at the 
ending of the five minute time. 

Now, please, listen to those two 
sentences from the episcopal address 
and then will you go immediately to 
your conversation. "We ask that each 
time you gather in a legislative com- 
mittee, in a caucus meeting, in ple- 
nary; you begin with five minutes of 
reflecting with another person, per- 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No.4 



103 



haps someone you do not know well, 
speaking about these two questions: 
What is my most earnest hope for the 
next few hours of this General Con- 
ference? Two. What do I believe is 
God's most fervent hope for these 
next few hours? Then we ask you to 
pray with that conversation partner 
beseeching God to bring the two 
hopes into one." 

(paired conversation) 

BISHOP OTT: In the name of our 
living God. Amen. Thank you Confer- 
ence. The order of the day is at hand. 
It has been announced to you as a Call 
to Witness and Prayer and the cele- 
bration of the United Methodist 
Church's historic stance in support of 
civil and human rights for all persons. 
This report begins, this call, this cele- 
bration, this order of our day, begins 
with the word from the Biblical wit- 
ness. You will need to be and want to 
be in silence, preparing to hear it. Will 
you please be in silence as we begin? 

Special Call to Awareness 

GATHERING 

God's Word: Amos 6:8 

WILLIAM K QUICK (Detroit. 
Michigan): In the words of the 
Prophet Amos... 

(scripture) 

Hymn: "Amazing Grace " (Verses 1, 2, 
and 3 will be sung by soloists) 

The Lord has promised good to me, his 
word my hope success; 

He will my shield and portion be, as 
long as life endures. 

Words of Welcome 

F. BELTON JOYNER JR. (Raleigh, 
N.C.): What do you do with a God who 
won't quit? What do you do? What do 
you do with a God who won't let go? 

God is a God of history. God moves 
m history in order to reach and claim 
God's people. That's our story. God 
touches history with the presence of 
grace. That's our experience. That's 
who we are. 



Consider, Moses leads the people 
out of bondage. Consider, Ne- 
buchanczzar becomes an unwitting 
servant of the one who owns history. 
Consider, Rahab lakes risk for a peo- 
ple not her own. Consider, Amos 
speaks a word of justice and judgment 
to a nation that's lost its focus. God is 
a God in history. 

And crash! With the softness of a 
baby and the hardness of a cross, God 
enters history in the incarnate word 
Jesus Christ! Nothing makes more 
clear the fullness of God's presence in 
this world, than the presence in this 
world of that cosmic Christ. 

We build boundaries, barriers, 
blocks. But God gate-crashes history, 
comes among us and won't let go. 

No wonder when we people of faith 
are at our best, we care about the daily 
news of history as well as the good 
news of faith. God is in both. 

So it has been in our Weslyan heri- 
tage: lives of faith lived in the midst of 
the world; Holy Club trips to the debt- 
or's prison; John Wesley's care for 
saving children when a society said, 
"Children were for using"; Wesley's 
passionate dying voice against slavery 
in this land. 

Thus it's in our Biblical roots and in 
our faith journey heritage to witness 
for human and civil rights for all per- 
sons. Our social pnnciples say it spe- 
cifically: "Certain basic human rights 
and civil liberties are due all persons." 

If God' s prevenicni grace is probing 
for a place for the spirit to land, how 
can I not give full human dignity to 
each soul? If God's image is stamped 
on that human sister or brother, how 
can I not acknowledge divine reflec- 
tion in that child of God? 

Yet we've not always seen that im- 
age — yet wc have not always acknow- 
ledged that grace — or seen that all 
persons — all persons breathe the 
same air molecules as did our incar- 
nate Lord, and God calls us to repent. 
In 199^, a majonty of those voting 
here in Colorado, approved an amend- 
ment to the State Constitution, 
Amendment Number Two, which 
some of our colleagues in United 
Methodism felt was at odds with our 



historic Wesleyan witness for human 
and civil rights for all. 

Some of our family saw the amend- 
ment to deny to gay, lesbian and bi- 
sexual persons basic human civil 
rights, and our tradition says "No" to 
such denial. 

To be sure, some of our United 
Methodist kin supported the amend- 
ment, and saw it as an extension of our 
official denominational view that the 
practice of homosexuality is incom- 
patible with Christian teaching. 

But from across the connection, 
came the voices of those who felt that 
in light of the passage of the amend- 
ment, it was no longer appropriate for 
this General Conference to meet in 
the state of Colorado. And yet, here 
we arc. Rather than leaving this mo- 
ment of history, we have stayed to see 
how God m ight be working in this, and 
how God would have us work in this. 

We call ourselves to prayers of re- 
pentance for ways we violated or 
looked past others. We make witness 
to God's freeing gift of basic rights for 
all humankind. Amendment Two. ..its 
fate is now in the courts. And us... 
what about us? Welcome! Enjoy the 
God that comes into history, and 
won't let go. So let us stand in heart 
or in posture, to acknowledge the 
presence of that God. 

CALL TO WORSHIP 

fOYNER: The Spirit of God is mov- 
ing.. 

AUDIENCE: Like the rushing of a 
mighty wind. We feel God's presence 
m our midst 

JOYNER: The Spirit of God is mov- 
ing... 

AUDIENCE: And we are "strangely 
wanned." God's fire melts hearts 
turned to stone; breaking down the 
barriers which have too long divided 
us. 

JOYNER: The Spirit of God is mov- 
ing.. 

AUDIENCE: Restoring sight to those 
wlw are spiritually blinded. Creating 
new words of praise for those who 
have lost their voices. Empowering 
those paralyzed by fear. 



104 



April 19, 1996 



JOYNER: Spirit of the Living God fall 
on us afresh. 

Spirit of the Living God fall on us 
afresh. 

Melt us, mold us, fill us, use us. 

AUDIENCE: The Spirit of God is mov- 
ing 

fOYNER: Amen. 

AUDIENCE: Amen. 

COLLECT FOR PURITY 

EVER YONE: Almighty God, to you all 
hearts are open, all desires known, 
and from you no secrets are hidden. 

Cleanse the thoughts of our hearts by the 
inspiration of your Holy Spirit, 

that we may perfectly love you, and 
worthily magnify your holy name, 
through Christ our Lord. Amen. 

MARY SILVA (Rio Grande Confer- 
ence): (speaking m Spanish) Scrip- 
ture: reading Ephestans 1:3-12 

fOYNER: reading Ephesians 1:3-12 

MEDITATION 

WILLIAM ABRAHAM (SW Texas): 
Let us pray together. 

Oh God, we pray that you will take 
our minds and think through them; 
that you will take my lips and speak 
through them; but that above all, you 
will take our hearts and set them on 
fire with love for you and for our 
neighbor, through Jesus Christ our 
Lord. Amen. 

The word of the living God as we 
find it in the Gospel according to St. 
Matthew, chapter nine, (reading of 
Matthew 9) 

A letter of the Reverend John 
Wesley, near London, February 1, 
1777: "My dear brother Christopher: 
James Curshaw, an obscure Irishman, 
is stark, staring mad. He prophesies 
that all the Methodists are to go over 
to Amenca in the belly of a whale " 
Now happily, the first Methodists 
from Ireland who came to this re- 
markable continent did not come in 
the belly of a whale. And happily they 
did not represent the eccentric James 
Curshaw. 

Robert Strawbridge, when he 
came, was, indeed, something of a 
maverick. When he showed up in 



Frederick, Maryland around 1762, he 
was a strong-willed individual who 
was prone to take ecclesiastical law 
into his own hands, and yet, God was 
able to make use of this remarkable 
itinerant preacher. And we see in 
Strawbridge all the passion, and the 
intensity and the industry which did 
so much to make Methodism a pivotal 
movement in western Christianity 
even before we began a church. 

Now, as we remember and cele- 
brate today what God has done 
through our movement and our 
church as an instrument of social jus- 
tice across the world, if s very impor- 
tant that we place this crucial aspect 
of our work and witness in an appro- 
priate theological and spiritual con- 
text. 

I think it's fair to say that at the 
outset we're only too aware, we are 
aware, surely, that we're here to cele- 
brate not what we have done. We are 
here to celebrate what God has done 
in his mercy in and through the ap- 
pearing of his Kmgdom among us. 
And I think it is just as well that we 
put the matter that way. For other- 
wise, we might have to spend as much 
time in repentance as we do in cele- 
bration and in commitment. 

Our record in the matter of social 
justice and natural and civil rights is 
frankly a mixed one. Sometimes it's a 
stem from our natural conservative 
instincts, instincts which are clearly 
visible in Wesley himself. At other 
times our reticences stem from the 
ambiguity and deeply contested char- 
acter of all political and social claims. 

Now our prophets, of course, have 
been very sure that they have had a 
word from the Lord m no uncertain 
terms. But our prophets have not al- 
ways been mfallible, so there's always 
been room also for debate and conten- 
tion, and the same is true, I suspect, 
today. So we need to carry ourselves 
with an appropriate degree of humility 
and circumspection. So we do here, 
now, celebrate what God has done m 
and through our efforts — even 
through our flawed efforts. 

Now, what's fascinating to mc as I 
read the record of our church in the 



area of social justice is the very par- 
ticular theological and spiritual con- 
text which made that possible. These 
components, I think, this spiritual and 
theological context is incipiently vis- 
ible in the passage that I read from 
Matthew — certainly visible in the 
passage from Ephesians. 

Why are we so concerned about 
matters of social justice? Of human 
and civil rights? In part, surely, it is 
because we are utterly committed to 
the gospel of the coming of the King- 
dom of God. 

There is no going back on that. Any 
movement which takes the gos- 
pel — this gospel — seriously cannot 
restrict the faith to a circle of private 
existence or experience. 

The Kingdom of God is inescapably 
political and social in its connotations. 
Entry into that is inescapably per- 
sonal but entry into that Kmgdom 
leads us ineluctably out into his- 
tory — into creation — into society so 
that God's wonderful rule may come 
in every nook and cranny of the world. 
Yet that Kingdom which we proclaim 
into which we enter — was announced 
and made visible in a way that was 
different from the run of the mill of 
politics of Christ's day, or for that 
matter, any other day. That King- 
dom's arrival was bom in deep com- 
passion. 

When Jesus saw the crowds he had 
compassion for them because they 
were harassed and helpless. Work in 
the Kingdom takes seriously the dis- 
order, the confusion and the darkness 
of human existence. It acknowledges 
that work is difficult and demanding. 
That therefore, it utterly depends 
upon prayer. So he said to his disciples 
the harvest is plentiful, but the labor- 
ers are few. Pray, therefore, that the 
Lord will send laborers into the har- 
vest. This work is to be carried out 
incamationally by people — by ordi- 
nary people like you and I. And so 
these disciples were initiated into the 
ways of Jesus. And eventually he gave 
to them an inimitable authonty over 
the destructive and disruptive powers 
at work in the world. 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No.' 



105 



Part of the genius of our movement 
has been the ability to integrate these 
different components of the Christian 
faith into a dynamic life-givmg reality. 
At our best we have held them to- 
gether in love and fellowship. We've 
been personally rooted in the gospel 
of the Kingdom — dnven by compas- 
sion — committed to the hard labor of 
harvesting — girded about with 
prayer — sold on fellowship and small 
groups and interpersonal con- 
tact — and utterly committed, surely, 
to the ending of injustice and oppres- 
sion and slavery and poverty in God's 
world. Now to be sure, we have wob- 
bled, and we have wavered. And no 
doubt we will wobble and we will 
waver again, but we humbly offer that 
wobbhng and wavering to God. And 
we know that he will make manifest 
his Kingdom in and through it all. 

And what then of the future? Can 
we incorporate our commitment to 
civil rights and justice into the mis- 
sion of our church, thoroughly and 
naturally? I think we can, if we take 
seriously and think seriously about 
the mission of the church as it is laid 
out here. 

The wider context in Matthew, it 
seems to me, is fascinating at this 
point. This passage that I have read is 
one of three passages. Chapter four 
gives us a wonderful account of Jesus 
going out and taking Galilee by storm. 
He didn't need a public relations firm 
to attract the crowds. The crowds 
came — so many of them that by the 
time you get to chapter nine you have 
what happens here — gathering the 
disciples, commissioning them to go 
out and do this work. And that won- 
derful and final commissioning in 
chapter 28: "All authority in heaven 
and on earth has been given to me. Go 
therefore and make disciples of the 
nations, baptizing them in the name of 
the Father, and of the Son and of the 
Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe 
all that I have commanded you, and lo, 
I am with you always to the close of 
the age." 

The disciples' work is clear. We are 
to go and make disciples, baptizing 
and teaching. And that is bonded. This 



is the wonder of it all. It is bonded on 
the one hand by the comprehensive 
authority of our risen Lord, and on the 
other it is bonded by the presence of 
the risen Lord with us here and now. 
We dare to go under the authority 
then, not of some secular philosophy 
or movement, but under the authority 
of Jesus Christ- We're not going to be 
afraid to work with other people who 
do not share those convictions. We 
can do that with flair. And as we go 
over against the secular world we 
seek assiduously to make disciples. 

This is no narrow or sentimental or 
cheap project. It involves making dis- 
ciples, that is, intentionally forming 
agents of the Kingdom of God who 
know God for themselves in justifica- 
tion and sanctification, and who know 
God so well that the whole of creation 
and society and history is to be 
brought under his compassionate rule 
and Kingdom. And as we go, we will 
be bonded by the double blessing of 
Christ's authority and presence? 

Now, let me make this concrete. I 
began my ministry in the Irish Meth- 
odist Church in a housing estate in 
Belfast which at that time had the 
worst murder rate in western Europe. 
Across from the front door of the 
church, there was a shabine. Now, 
what's a shabine? It's very simple. It's 
an illegal drinking club, which was in 
this case run by a band of local terror- 
ists. 

On one occasion I visited one of my 
church leaders in an apartment above 
the shabine. He had yielded to temp- 
tation, i found both he and his wife 
lying flat out drunk and naked, soaked 
in their own urine. 

We had no windows in the church 
because we could not get insurance to 
cover them. They were broken every 
time we put them back in. And there 
were occasions when we found dead 
bodies dumped at the rear of the 
church. I learned an awftil lot from 
that experience. But one thing I 
learned above all else. I learned how 
important it is to make uncompromis- 
ing disciples if we are to be serious 
about social transformation. 



I recall the women who had been on 
the peace marches in Ireland and who 
had been spat on and kicked for doing 
it. I recall the young Christians who 
had to learn to survive in a hostile 
environment and I recall those who 
had to work so hard to build new 
structures for a stable society and for 
peace and for lasting justice. Now, we 
know, do we not, that we will not have 
any deep impact on the world if we 
restrict the faith to the private sphere 
and hrait the Kingdom to some ver- 
sion of individual salvation. But 
equally we know that we will not 
change the world if we restnct our 
work to proclamations and declara- 
tions and whatever else we do without 
rooting people firmly and deeply in 
the Kingdom of God. 

Let me put it very personally. 
Thirty years ago this year, I was wob- 
bling my way into the Christian theo- 
thought of atheism. As a seeker, 
seeking the Kingdom of God, one 
thing was clear even then. If you are 
going to ask me to go out there under 
the front lines and help change the 
world, then make me a disciple of 
Jesus Christ. Teach me the faith. 
Nourish me in compassion. Bring me 
into and root me in the Church. Intro- 
duce me to the working of the Holy 
Spirit, and teach me to fast and pray 
and stay the course. Don't leave that 
to others to do that. 

And if you make me a disciple, 
make me a genuine disciple of the 
Kingdom. Introduce me to the rule of 
God which has come in Jesus Christ. 
Introduce me to the justice and to the 
implications of that in the social and 
political sphere without fear. Make 
me a disciple who is acquitted of my 
sin, and who is Hberated to serve God 
and the neighbor with passion, with a 
passion for justice and peace. 

This vision, it seems to me, of mak- 
ing disciples, has been central to the 
Christian faith at its best. It's been at 
the heart of our Church in its origins, 
and it is crucial, I dare to say, to our 
faithfulness unto God for the future. 
And to our God, Father, Son, and Holy 
Spirit be all glory, majesty, dominion, 



106 



April 19, 1996 



and power, both now and unto ages of 
ages. Amen. 

(ApplauseJ 

Hymn: "River of Tears, Streams of Jus- 
tice" 

Witness: Andrei Kim, Moscow, Rus- 
sia: 
Translated by: Tobias Dietze 

I greet you, brothers and sisters, in 
the name of our Lord, Jesus Christ, 
our Savior. And I greet you in the 
name of all our church neighbors of 
the Russia United Methodist Church. 
When I was leaving Russia and my 
church, I asked my church members 
to pray for this conference, that it 
would be under the leadership of God, 
and all of its outcomes would be for 
the sake of the Gospel of Christ. So at 
this moment, more than 6,000 miles 
from here, the young Russian Meth- 
odist Church is praymg for you. 

Our country, Russia, is having a 
time of hardship now. There are a lot 
of problems in economic life, politics, 
and spiritual hfe. And the situation is 
such that m his own country, the Rus- 
sian citizens do not have any guaran- 
tees for life and civil rights. Indeed, 
we have a saying in Russia that says, 
guarantees are given only by the Lord 
and the Funeral Services Bureau. 

The most important problem for 
the Russians at this moment is how to 
earn their daily bread. And of course, 
man needs his daily bread, and he 
needs certain conditions to lead a nor- 
mal life. And these conditions do not 
exist; that already means that there is 
no normal life. And of course, the situ- 
ation is used by those who want the 
return to the olden times, who want 
to create nationalist tendencies, and 
who seek the enemy everywhere 

I do not want to speak about politics 
and economy, but I want to concen- 
trate on the spiritual life in Russia. 
The problem is mostly illustrated by 
the statement from Sugannoff 
(spelled phonetically), a candidate for 
presidency in Russia which was made 
recently. He said, "If I will be elected 
for president, I will prohibit any pro- 
fessions, denominations, apart from 



Russian Orthodoxy . This is a very real 
threat, because the Russian Orthodox 
Church agrees to that and makes also 
some efforts in that direction. In spite 
of all the matenal problems, a lot of 
people come to the church because 
they are seeking spiritual food, since 
man does not live on bread alone. And, 
of course, the major pan ol the popu- 
lation came to the Russian Orthodox 
Church as the prevailing church in 
Russia. Regrettably, in many of these 
Russian Orthodox churches — in 
their — sermons — priests preach 
about the destroying power and 
strength of other denominations and 
of their untruthfulness. That's why 
they want to prohibit any other new 
denominations. 

Last year, I had the possibility to 
take part m a conference of the Rus- 
sian Orthodox Church as a repre- 
sentative of the United Methodist 
Church m Russia. The central issue of 
that conference was mission in the 
Russian Orthodox Church and their 
understanding of proselytizing. There 
was a very specific understanding of 
liberty, liberty of religion. Their un- 
derstanding of liberty means, not 
equality of all denominations, but a 
privileged position of the Russian Or- 
thodox Church as the traditional, the 
cultural, and the religious heritage of 
the country. Those privileges do have 
to be confirmed and sanctified by state 
law. And I said, of course we don't 
argue that the Russian Orthodox 
Church is the main denomination in 
Russia and has the biggest cultural 
and social heritage. 

But on the other hand, the presence 
of different denominations and even 
sects in Russia, this is only for the 
good — even of Russian Ortho- 
doxy — because it stimulates the Rus- 
sian Orthodox Church to strengthen 
Its efforts to force their troubles for 
mission in the country. And to pro- 
hibit other denominations would also 
be a spiritual loss for Russian Ortho- 
doxy. Those words, those were my 
words, were not accepted at the con- 
ference. 

I myself find ray church weak spir- 
its, what this position of the Russian 



Orthodox Church means. After two 
years, we were kicked out of the 
building of the public library where we 
had worship services on Sundays. Our 
church was hopeless and was in dan- 
ger of being extinguished. But, thanks 
to God, we found a new room, new 
premises, and our church is living. 
And this is the problem not only of our 
church, but all non-Russian Orthodox 
denominations in Russia. And each 
year it is becoming more difficult to 
preach the Word of God in a Protes- 
tant or non-Russian Orthodox congre- 
gation. But those difficulties only 
strengthen our belief. And I believe 
that, thanks to our and your prayers, 
I believe that the grace of God and the 
will of God will prevail in Russia, and 
the Kingdom of the Lord will do well 
there also. May our Lord bless you. 
Thank you very much. 

(applause) 

Hymn: "As Your Children Lord"; 

Tune: Kum ba yah. My Lord 
As your children, Lord, we are here 

(3X) 
Lord, we are here, OLord, we are here. 
Dyeti muiy tvahyee, Gospod (3X) 
muiy zdyes, Gospod. 
Fill our spirits. Lord, with your love 

(3X) 
Lord, give your love. 
Dai lyubov svaiyou, Gospod; (3X) 
napolni, dushi nam. 

Witness: Dorothy Yeoman, Elgin, Illi- 
nois 

For almost 12 years, I've been go- 
ing down to the Dwight Correctional 
Center in Dwight, Illinois, the prison 
for women there, as a volunteer. And 
to begin this ministry. Church 
Women United decided to build a 
chapel and a children's visitation cen- 
ter there. It took us ten years to raise 
the needed funds and a lot of state and 
government interference, but we did 
it! 

Now that chape! is being used daily, 
and we have felt that, when a mother 
is impnsoned, her children suffer 
from the enforced incarceration. And 
so, in the children's visitation center, 
mothers can visit their children in a 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No.4 



107 



more homelike atmosphere, read to 
them, and play games with them; and 
we've raised funds for toys and books 
as well. 

There are almost 800 women incar- 
cerated at Dwight and between 35 and 
50 of them attend the monthly Bible 
study that I've led. Eighty percent of 
these women are abused and bat- 
tered, but because they're poor, most 
of an ethnic minority, and have not had 
the best legal advice, they're serving 
time in pnson. 

John Wesley, our founder of 
Methodism, told us that justice should 
be our concern, and justice for those 
imprisoned was his plea. Now in Eng- 
land — ^John Wesley's home — in 1969, 
the death penalty was abolished. In 
this country, in the past 75 years, 417 
people have been found to be wrongly 
convicted of their crimes and 23 of 
those human beings were executed, 
but were innocent. Even though we 
now execute criminals on all sides, 
violent crimes continue to rise. And 
because of the high cost of executions 
and appeals, some criminals are serv- 
ing only 20 percent of their sentences. 
How many laid-off police officers is 
one execution worth? 

Recently, there was a story in the 
national press, maybe some of you 
have read it. Illmois was going to exe- 
cute the first woman m almost 60 
years Gwen Garcia had killed her 
abuser. If I told you the whole story of 
Gwen Garcia's life, you'd hardly be- 
lieve it. On death row, she lost all 
hope, and in writing me, she said why 
should she have other appealsi* She'd 
never had justice given her, why 
should she expect it now? And so she 
wanted to die. 

Amnesty International then en- 
tered the picture, publicized Gwen's 
past life. She watched her mother 
commit suicide as a very young child. 
She was raped repeatedly by an uncle 
with whom she lived, and was forced 
into a marriage by her family for which 
they were paid $1,500. 

She was then abused and sexually 
mutilated by her Iranian husband. 
When her baby daughter was to be 
given back to that family to be raised, 



she held that child in her arms and 
smothered her, rather than have her 
go to live the same way she had lived. 
She was found guilty of murder of that 
baby daughter, sentenced to 20 years, 
and because of good behavior was out 
in ten years. 

Out of prison, she married, and was 
again abused, and so she killed her 
abusive husband. And for this she was 
given the death penalty. 

I was asked if I would sign a petition 
for clemency to be sent to the gover- 
nor, and I did, not just to save Gwen's 
life, but because I'm a United Meth- 
odist lay women and a disciple of 
Christ. And I don't believe in the 
death penalty, which is also stated in 
our Social Pnnciples. 

Biancajagger came from New York 
City, and I'm sure that her celebrity 
status brought this case more into the 
public eye than my pleas. But just 12 
hours before Gwen was going to be 
executed, the governor commuted 
her sentence to life in prison without 
parole. 

I continue to stand against capital 
punishment, but sometimes I feel that 
I'm standing alone; for how many 
United Methodists, either laity or 
clergy, are speaking out against it? 
Another victim of abuse sitting on 
death row in Illinois has asked me to 
help with her clemency plea, and I 
intend to do that. 

Thank you for listening to my plea. 
I promise to keep my commitment for 
battered women serving time in 
pnson. And I'll continue to try and 
help them in ray prison ministry. 
Thank you. 

(Applause) 

Solo: "Help Us Accept Each Other" 
Steven Kimbrough 

Witness: Randy Miller, San Francisco, 

California 
Out of the wilderness we cry, Lord. 

God, hear our prayer. And how, how 

shall I sing, sing the Lord's song m 

a foreign land? 

My dear brothers and sisters, I rise 
before you this nioniing to witness to 
the redeeming power of Jesus Christ, 



and to tell the good news that God's 
spirit is even now at work, reconciling 
and healing all those whom the Spirit 
touches. I know that the God who has 
brought us thus far on our journey will 
not forsake us until we are perfected 
in grace. 

My sisters and brothers, I rise be- 
fore you this morning as a proud Afri- 
can-American, as a gay man, as a 
Christian, a United Methodist, and a 
child of God, seeking God's will for my 
life, the life of the church, and the life 
of the worid. I have been asked to 
provide a witness this morning to the 
terrible scourge of discrimination 
faced by gays and lesbians, bisexuals 
and transgendered persons all over 
the world. 

Although I am not yet 40 years old, 
I have seen enough discrimination 
and hatred as an African-American 
man and as an openly gay man, to turn 
the heart to stone. 

While attending seminary in At- 
lanta in the 1980s, I witnessed the 
torching of a newly-built Metropolitan 
Community Church simply because it 
was a place that welcomed gay and 
lesbian Christians. I waited for the 
outcry from the religious community 
that I naively thought must inevitably 
come when a house of God is dese- 
crated. The silence was deafening. 
Lord, have mercy on us! 

While working at the General 
Board of Discipleship in Nashville, 
Tennessee, I met a gay man in church 
who had suffered irreparable brain 
damage after having been savagely 
beaten by a group of angry young 
teenagers who came upon him and his 
lover sitting in their car together. His 
lover was beaten to death. Lord, have 
mercy upon us! 

And in ray own life, I have known 
the fear of losing ray job and liveli- 
hood. I have felt the discrimination 
that comes from being bom both Afri- 
can-American and gay. I have started 
over far too many times and searched 
far too often in vain for job openings 
where living proudly and openly, as 
God created all of us to be, was not a 
liability, but an asset. I have felt the 
alienation that must always go hand in 



April 19, 1996 



hand with discnniination. I know the 
rejection of being the unwelcome 
guest, even in God's house, even in 
this Church. 

In this very state in which we hold 
this great conference, a law has been 
passed which would deny me my civil 
rights, and not allow me to seek the 
legal remedies should I lose ray job or 
home simply because I am a gay man. 
Now those who support this measure 
argue that they arc only protecting all 
of us against the special rights of a 
small minority. In response to that, I 
hear the melodic voice of Coretta 
Scott King at a recent conference in 
Atlanta that I attended. Quoting her 
husband Martin, "We must come to 
see," she said, "that we are bound in 
an inescapable web of mutuality, and 
an injustice anywhere is an injustice 
everywhere." 

(Applause) 

As United Methodists and the spiri- 
tual children of John Wesley, we come 
from a long tradition that has proudly 
stood and defended the human and 
civil rights of all people. 

Discnmination and intolerance, no 
matter how they clothe themselves, 
and no matter where they occur, are 
great evils; no matter where they oc- 
cur all around the world, are great 
evils. They are not made more holy 
because some of those who support 
the repeal of the rights of lesbians and 
gays have communion with us in 
God's Church. They are not made 
more holy. As Christians, we dare not 
rest with simply supporting the civil 
rights of gay and lesbian people and all 
people. To paraphrase Jesus, "Even 
those who arc without the fellowship 
of God. do this." 

Jesus calls us to do more. Jesus 
calls us to embrace the exile and lift 
up the downtrodden, and surely, 
surely, that must include gay and les- 
bian people. 

Let us pray today, my brothers and 
sisters, for a new understandingof the 
heart, that will, in the twinkling of an 
eye, give us an understanding of the 
sanctity of the human and civil rights 
of all God's children. 



Let us pray that the time will come 
now, and come quickly, when we will 
no longer need civil nghis laws to 
protect the least of these, because 
God's law will be written in every 
human heart. 

Let us pray that God's reconciling 
love will fall on us even now, even 
here, in this General Conference, and 
that we will in tearful forgiveness, 
embrace and comfort each other for 
past wrongs and as God's free chil- 
dren, reconcile. 

And finally, my gay and lesbian 
brothers and sisters I say, lift up your 
hearts, for God has not forsaken us, 
and our liberation must come as 
surely as moniing follows the long 
night and as spring follows the bitter 
winter. I say, lift up your hearts, for 
our salvation is at hand. Now, now is 
the moment to heal our Church. Now 
is the moment to cast down the walls 
that divide us and be made one. Now 
is God's moment. Now. Now. Amen. 
I pray that this is a faithful witness. 

(Applause) 

Hymn: "Jesus, United By Thy Grace" 

Jesus, united by thy grace and each to 

each endured, 
with confidence we seek thy face and 

know our prayer is heard. 

Witness: Minerva (Mrcano, Rio 

Grande Conference, Albuquerque, 

New Mexico 

As I have considered speaking to 
you about human and civil rights, I 
have been haunted by the image of 
darkness within. 

Every time I have attempted to 
look out into society at the invitation 
to share with you an insight of the 
subject of human and civil rights, I 
have been drawn again and again in- 
wardly. Even as I have desired to say 
to you, as a woman of color, that the 
Church has been courageous and 
faithful, I have been silenced — si- 
lenced by a spirit much greater than 
ray own that forces me to see dark- 
ness rather than light— that does not 
allow me to speak a word of affinna- 
tion — that requires rather that I speak 



a word of judgment that light might 
truly shine. 

We, the United Methodist Church, 
are constant defenders of person's hu- 
man and civil rights. We are quick to 
condemn any person or institution 
that violates the sacredness of human 
life, that devalues a person's gifts and 
abilities, that tears apart someone's 
body or spint. We, indeed, strive to be 
a beacon of light in a world of dark- 
ness. Yet there is a deep darkness 
within us — a darkness so profound 
and so enveloping, that we have been 
swallowed up by it, seduced by its 
comfort, no longer able to recognize 
for ourselves the difference between 
light and darkness. Our racism, our 
sexism, and our homophobia are 
symptoms of our acquiescing to the 
darkness within. 

I remember, not so long ago, arriv- 
ing at a jurisdictional conference on a 
bright, shining summer day — sum- 
mer morning — entering the place of 
meeting and watching the sunlight 
streaming through. The election of 
bishops was the agenda at hand. And 
as the conference began, a word came 
across the floor of that conference, a 
guiding message: "Two is enough. 
Two is enough. Two is enough." It 
was an unholy mantra, spoken as if 
sacred word. And it moved across that 
sunlit meeting room, filling it with 
great darkness. 

What did it mean? It meant that no 
other Black person would be elected 
to the episcopacy on that occasion, 
because there were already two bish- 
ops who were Black serving in that 
jurisdiction, and two was enough. 

It did not matter whether the Spirit 
was lifting up a Black brother or sister 
for such a call. It did not matter 
whether a Black sister or brother had 
greater gifts for the ministry of the 
episcopacy than the others being con- 
sidered. It did not matter whether the 
Church would be blessed by the lead- 
ership of a person who happened to be 
Black. It simply did not matter, for 
"two was enough." 

I recall a day when a sister left the 
United Methodist Church. She 
walked away because she determined 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No.4 



109 



one day that she had been beaten 
down long enough. Though gifted, the 
Church had always found reasons for 
not receiving her gifts. Though wise, 
the Church consistently told her that 
she simply did not understand. 
Though deeply spiritual, the Church 
found her spirituality lacking. Though 
faithful, she was never faithful enough 
lor the Church. She was a United 
Methodist clergy woman who served 
throughout this connectional Church 
of ours. Included, but always ex- 
cluded — recognized, but always de- 
nied. In the hght of retrospect, she 
understood that the problem was that, 
though she was a White person, she 
was not a man. Sometime after leav- 
ing the Church, she said to me, "I 
went from the darkness of abuse to 
the hght of healing." 

And I cannot help but recognize 
before you that it was precisely at a 
General Conference that I came to 
know the truth about a Christian's 
attitude toward a relationship with ho- 
mosexual persons. I was a seminarian 
then, struggling with the issue of ho- 
mosexuality, desperately wanting to 
be faithful. I was standing with some 
of the most godly persons I knew at 
that General Conference. Their lips 
spoke of nothing other than God's 
love and God's mercy. 

But then a self-avowed homosexual 
crossed our path, another United 
Methodist, and those lips of sweet- 
ness began to spew out the most vile 
attacks agamst that brother. Not loud 
enough for him to hear, of course, but 
loud enough to help me hear. Hatred 
was not the answer, nor was it exclu- 
sion, nor apathy. The right Christian 
attitude towards a relationship with 
homosexual persons must be one of 
nothing less than love. That was a 
long, long time ago, but things have 
not changed. Sweet lips still spew foul 
darkness upon us. And love — love is 
still the bearer of light. 

It is no mystery that the world 
around us remains in darkness in 
spite of our concerted efforts as 
United Methodists to stand for human 
and civil rights. Though we are cer- 
tainly not the Light, we arc called to 



be the embodiment of the Light. Un- 
fortunately, our embodiment of the 
Light appears to be only skin- 
deep — an inner core of darkness re- 
sisting the indwelling of the etenial 
Light. And thusly, dis-erapowering 
our efforts to truly stand for the hu- 
man and civil rights of persons. 

May God have mercy upon us, and 
may we someday, as United Method- 
ists, and as the Christians we claim to 
be, and as the Christians we can be, 
be truly God's light m a world of dark- 
ness; true defenders of persons' hu- 
man and civil nghts. 

Solo: "Precious Lord" 

Witness: Francisco de Castro Maria, 

Angola 

Amen. First of all, I would like to 
thank the office of the General Con- 
ference for inviting me through Iliff 
School of Theology, where I am a 
student, to speak briefly on this cru- 
cial topic, human rights in Angola. I'm 
sure that I'm not the right person to 
speak on this topic, but there is such 
a reason why I accepted to do so. I 
accepted to speak on this topic be- 
cause I am a Christian and also I am 
an Angolan. 

As a Christian, I believe that one of 
the cardinal messages of Christianity 
is to emphasize the peculiarity and 
importance of the human being in the 
universe. And as an Angolan, I think 
that It is important that Angola ad- 
dresses Itself to the issues involved 
since one can say that Angola, like all 
African countries, suffers some viola- 
tion of human rights. 

For more than four centuries, An- 
gola people experienced the violation 
of human rights and racial discrimina- 
tion due to the colonization imposed 
on Angolans and denied the Black 
people the nght to call themselves as 
humans by being providers of labor for 
the prosperity of Portuguese coloniz- 
ers. Angola won its independence 
from Portugal twenty years ago. Now. 
in independent Angola, the single 
most senous threat to human rights 
is going to come from lack of develop- 
ment caused by external forces. 



When people cannot satisfy their 
basic wants and needs such as food, 
shelter, and employment, they be- 
come restive, and the leaders respond 
by curtailing even further other hu- 
man rights. So, although there have 
been encouraging signs lately, that 
leaders of Angola are showing con- 
cern about human rights, the grave 
economic, political, and social situ- 
ation in which Angola is right now, 
gives us cause for concern. 

Secondly, I believe that the number 
of refugees is an indicator of the de- 
gree of violation of human rights in 
Angola. Currently, Angola has more 
than 500,000 refugees, and has been 
described by the United Nations High 
Commission for Refugees as one of 
the worst refugee problems in the 
African continent. I hope this situ- 
ation indicates that there is a lot to be 
done by churches and by all the people 
of Angola to solve this problem. And 
of course, we'll need your prayers and 
help. Are you ready to pray for us and 
give us help? Thank you. 

Reprise: "Precious Lord" 

A SEASON OF PRAYER 

BISHOP R. JOB: Prayer is native 
language for us all. Prayer is not pas- 
sive, but one of humankind's most 
profound activities that always leads 
to action. And so we enter this time of 
prayer with confidence in the One for 
whom all things are possible. 

Our Season of Prayer begins with 
invitation, then moves to silence, ado- 
ration, petition, intercession, cove- 
nant, and concludes with the prayer 
that is common to us all. The bridge 
between each segment of our prayer 
time will be a musical response, and 
you are invited to sing as our music 
directors give us leadership. 

When we come to the time of peti- 
tion and intercession, we invite you to 
stand and form small clusters of 
prayer where you are. Join hands if 
you wish. And during this time you 
may, if you wish, speak your prayers 
audibly. 

Each of these sessions is a brief 
time, but you don't need to worry 



no 



April 19, 1996 



about time, because, again, we will 
be prompted by the music. Will you 
join me now in the prayer of invita- 
tion? 

Then Jesus told them a parable 
about their need to pray always and 
not to lose heart. Luke 18:1 

UNISON PRAYER 

Loving God, 

We come to watch and pray at your 

invitation. 
Because you have promised to be with 

those 
Who gather in your name, we come with 

joy. 
We welcome your presence into our 

midst 
And ask for your help in this time of 

prayer 
So that we may pray and live as you 

desire 
In the name and spirit of Jesus. Amen. 

SILENCE 

Silence helps us to hear the voice of the 
one who has everything to tell us and 
nothing to learn from us. — Evelyn 
Underhill. 

Each person ts invited to listen quietly 
and carefully as individually and 
corporately we seek God's will. 

RESPONSE 

Jesus, remember me when you come 

into your Kingdom. 
Jesus, remember me when you come 

into your Kingdom. 

ADORATION 

In the school of adoration the soul learns 
why the approach to every other goal 
had left it restless. — Douglas Steere. 

Individually and silently we offer our 
thanksgiving and praise to God. 

RESPONSE 

PETITION 

Prayer is an invitation to God to inter- 
vene in our lives. — Abraham Joshua 
Heschel. 

In small groups of four to six we pray 
audibly and with each other for our 
deepest needs. 



RESPONSE 
INTERCESSION 

To clasp the hands in prayer is the 
beginning of an uprising against the 
disorder of the world. — Karl Barth. 

Continuing in the same small cluster 
groups we pray for God's interven- 
tion m the places, persons and situ- 
ation most needing God's help. 

RESPONSE 

COVENANT 

What we need is a desire to know the 
whole will of God, with a fixed reso- 
lution to do it. — John Wesley. 

Together we offer all that we are to God 
as we make the Wesley Covenant 
prayer our own. 

I am no longer my own, but yours. 

Put me to what you will. 

Rank me with whom you will. 

Put me to doing, put me to suffering, 

let me be employed by you or laid aside 
for you, 

exalted for you or brought low by you. 

Let me be full, let me be empty, 

let me have all things, let me have noth- 
ing. 

I freely and heartily yield all things 

to your pleasure and disposal. 

And now, glorious and blessed God, 

Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, 

you are mine, and I am yours. So be it. 

May the covenant which I have made on 
earth, 

be ratified in heaven. Amen. 

RESPONSE 

THE LORD'S PRAYER 

BISHOP JOB: Together we offer 
our prayers and our hves and our 
shared destiny in the name of Jesus, 
who taught us to pray, saying, Our 
Father... 

BENEDICTION 
F. Beltonjoyner 

DISMISSAL WITH BLESSING 

WILLIAM ABRAHAM: Let us all 
stand together. Now, relax, and 
stand tall. Revel in the mercy of God 
our Father. Draw unsparingly on the 
grace of our Lord Jesus Christ Re- 



joice in the ever-present power of the 
Holy Spirit In that mercy, grace, and 
power, bind up the broken hearted. 
Heal the sick. Feed the hungry. Take 
care of the poor. Set at liberty the 
captives. And bring release to those 
who are oppressed. Work incessantly 
for justice for all peoples and for all 
persons. And proclaim the acceptable 
year of the Lord. And may the bless- 
ing of God the Father, God the Son, 
and God the Holy Spirit rest and 
abide on all of us this day and unto 
ages of ages. And the people of God 
said, "Amen." 
Hymn: " God of Grace and God of 
Glory" 



Courtesies and Privileges Committee 

BISHOP OTT: I expect that you 
would want me on your behalf to offer 
thanks to the Commission on the 
General Conference, and in particular 
the team that they pulled together to 
bring this special call to awareness. 
Thank you. 

(applause) 

We have only a few necessary 
items before you will be adjourned to 
a welcomed break and then legislative 
committees. We need to hear from 
the Courtesies and Privileges Com- 
mittee, the Presiding Officers Com- 
mittee, and announcements. Bill 
Cook. Is Bill Cook available? Thank 
you, sir. This is a report from the 
Committee on Courtesies and Privi- 
leges. 

BILL COOK: We have in our midst 
an ordained elder from Northern IHi- 
nois we've been asked to acknow- 
ledge. Rev. Tom Gray, who is 
working across the country against 
the expansion of legalized gambling. 
He has testified before the U.S. Sen- 
ate, U.S. House, been featured in U.S. 
News and World Report, he speaks for 
us, as United Methodists. He will be 
available from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. today 
to let you ask questions and hear what 
he's doing. He is a field director for 
National Coalition Against Legalized 
Gambling. Rev. Tom Gray? I don't 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No.4 



111 



see him, but if you would, welcome 
him. 

(applause) 

Bishop Ott, we would request the 
permission of the conference to ask 
Bishop Peter Dabaie to speak upon 
the crisis in Nigeria. 

BISHOP OTT: You are requesting 
that at this time, or at a later time? 

COOK: At this time or at a later 
date. 

BISHOP OTT: Perhaps it would be 
well for you and the committee to 
decide with the Agenda Committee 
on the placement of that. Would you 
do that? 

COOK: I will be happy to. 

BISHOP OTT: Thank you very 
much. Rex Bevins for Presiding Offi- 
cers Committee, please. 

REX BEVINS: Tomorrow morn- 
ing's presiding officer on Friday, April 
19th, will be Bishop Ann Shearer of 
the Missouri Area. 

BISHOP OTT: Thank you, and now 
to our conference secretary. 

Thursday Morning Announcements 

CAROLYN MARSHALL: Several 
announcements for our information 



and continuing responsibilities. The 
first one would call for the Committee 
on Agenda and Calendar as nom inated 
now by the Council of Bishops and 
published on page 61m today's Daily 
Christian Advocate to convene in 
room A210 at 12:30 today for organi- 
zation. 

The choirs which are singing for us 
each morning before worship and 
then also during the worship experi- 
ence will be also sharing of their min- 
istry at 2 p.m. each afternoon. That 
will be in the prefunctionary area near 
the Ballroom. Please avail yourselves 
of these additional opportunities for 
the ministry in music which they 
bring to us. 

Several persons have brought to 
the attention of those responsible for 
facilities that there has not been op- 
portunity to recycle paper. Several 
notes have arrived here saying there 
are recycling receptacles in the back 
of the rooms and to encourage all of 
us to please recycle as much paper as 
it is possible for us to do. 

And lastly, but certainly one that you 
will all want to be aware of, as we move 
into our legislative committee meet- 
ings and then into sub-committee 
meetings, maybe even sub-subcommit- 



tee meetings, space — although it seems 
enormous as you enter this facility, is 
truly at a premium. However, it is ex- 
tremely important that we not utilize 
hallways for those meetings. Some of 
you may be aware that yesterday when 
that happened, it just so coincided with 
the time that one of the fire marshals 
walked through. And we were on the 
verge of panic because they were ready 
to shut down the whole conference. So 
please adhere to holding all meetings 
within the confines of specified rooms. 
Thank you Bishop Ott. 

BISHOP OTT: Thank you . In a mo- 
ment I will call on a bishop of the 
Church, and the president of CIE- 
MAL, to have our dismissal prayer. 
There are refreshments available. I 
would presume that you would be 
convening, unless other arrange- 
ments have been made, as soon as 
possible in your legislative commit- 
tees. We have a distinguished guest 
with us on the platform through this 
morning's session. President of CIE- 
MAL, Bishop Isaias Gutierrez. I've 
asked him to come and dismiss us. 

BISHOP ISAIAS GUTIERREZ: 
Let us pray, (in Spanish) 

(prayer) 



EXTRA!! United Methodist News Service EXTRA!! 

Getting 
the news out 





• To your family and friends 

Check the news daily by computer and telephone 

- Internet http://www.umc.org/umns.html 

- InfoServ's Daily Roundup 615 742 5432 

• To your conference communicators 

News and photos for your publications back home 

• To the secular media 

News and photos to newspapers, radio, and TV in your 
region, including Spanish and Korean language and Native 
American news outlets 

Questions? Ideas? 

Check with United Methodist News Service 
in the Press Room, Ballroom I, Lower Level 



Brought to you by 



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DailyReport 

Daily Christian Advocate 

THE GENERAL CONFERENCE OF THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 



Denver, Colorado 



Saturday, April 20, 1996 



Vol. 3 No. 5 



Day Four: Prayer for Others, Legislation for the Church 



The 72-voice choir of First United Methodist Church, 
Peoria, 111., greeted delegates and visitors as they found 
their places to begin day four of General Conference. Led 
by Timothy Corday and augmented by the Dynamic Brass 
Quintet, also from Peoria, the choir set the stage for 
morning worship led by Alabama-West Florida Area 
Bishop William W. Morris. 

Wisconsin Area Bishop Sharon Zimmerman Rader 
preached on "Prayers for Struggling Saints," continuing 
the dehberate effort to surround the conference with a 
mantle of prayer. She described a prayerful, honest rela- 
tionship with God, growing from her experiences with 
United Methodists in Zimbabwe and readings from the 
Psalms. "A true relationship with another," she said. 





Agenda 




Saturday, April 20, 1996 


8:15 a.ni. 


Choral Music 


8:30 a.m. 


Worship 


9:00 a.m. 


Call to Order and Discernment 




Committee on Courtesies and Privileges 




Resolution on the Retirement of Robert Feaster 




Presentation to U.S. Secretary of Education 


9:15 a.m. 


Committee on Hispanic Ministries Report 




Presentation of Hispanic Hymnal 


10:00 a.m. 


Judicial Council and University Senate 




Nominations 


10:10 a.m. 


Break 


10:30 a.in. 


Calendar Items 




Orientation (Coordinator of Calendar) 




Action 


12:15 p.m. 


Committee on Presiding Officers Report 




Committee on Agenda and Calendar Report 




Announcements 


12:30 p.m. 


Lunch Recess 


2:30 p.m. 


Legislative Committees 


5:00 p.m. 




7:30 p.m. 


Legislative Committees 



"demands that all of life is to be shared" with complete 
openness and honesty. 

"The psalmist teaches us how to pray and how to live 
in relationship to God and to each other. Be honest. It is 
OK to cry out; cry out from isolation. It is also right to let 
loose with exuberant shouts of praise. Give expression 
to doubt; live in trust. Be honest about your anguish; sing 
with joy. Let God hear the sounds of guilt and hope." 

Plenary Session 

Presiding Bishop Ann B. Sherer, Missouri Area, recog- 
nized Philip Fenn, Oklahoma Conference delegation 
clergy leader, and Ann Saunkeah, Oklahoma Indian Mis- 

(continued on page 114) 




Oklahoma delegate Judy Benson observes a moment of silence in remem- 
brance of victims of the Oklahoma City bombing. While we are busy with 
tings, our hearu have been listening to the many cries of God's people. 
VMSSiiimMilcDuBcBe 



April 20, 1996 



(continued from front page) 

sionary Conference, for a statement of concern and prayer 
honoring the memory of those who died, those who 
gneved and those who helped following the Oklahoma 
City bombing one year ago. While delegates were pray- 
ing, extra forces kept watchful eyes on the convention 
center. Later the conference approved a suggestion by 
Chester Jones, Little Rock Conference, that a message of 
concern "be faxed from the conference to Mayor Ron 
Nomck of Oklahoma City. 

Delegate Randy Day, New York Conference, asked the 
body to hear a statement of concern over Israeli attacks 
on south Lebanon. The morning papers had reported a 
barrage killmg at least 75 Lebanese civihans and wound- 
ing more than 100. Ohio West Area Bishop Judith Craig 
read the strongly worded statement, which said in part: 
"Self-defense is not a legitimate justification for so mas- 
sive and calculated an effort. ..." The conference then 
asked Council of Bishops President Woodie W. White to 
lead a delegation to Washington, D.C., to present the 
statement to President Clinton or Vice President Gore 
and report back to the conference. The full statement is 
pnnted elsewhere in this issue oiXbeDCA. 

Joy Moore, West Michigan, asked the conference to 
hear a statement by Bishop D.P, Dabale of Nigeria about 
conditions there. The bishop reminded delegates that the 
church had Evangelical United Brethren missionaries in 
Karim Lamido as early as 1923. The area is predomi- 
nantly United Methodist. He described "an unusual 
showdown" between Christians and Moslems which es- 
calated to an Easter Sunday incident in which "a whole 



Daily Christian Advocate 

Editorial Offices - Exhibit Hall B 

Denver Convention Center 

Sales and Subscriptions - DCA Booth 



Editor J. Richard Pedt 

Assodate Editor Shdla McGee 

Assistait Editor Joan Shoup 

Roundup and Photo Editor Brad Motta 

News and Feaures Editor Barbara Dunlap-Berg 

News and Feaures Writers Roger Burgess, Keith Fohl 

Computer Manager/Calendar Editor Mike Cunninghan) 

Compositian Editor for Proceedings Gayl Hinton 

Composition Editor for News and Features Richard Street 

Recorder/Trainer/Conversion Specialist Glenn Hinton 

Assistait Trainer Vem Denney 

Manager of Audio Transdiption George Dunn 

Audio Techniaans Gilbert Elam, Steve Fleener, Walter Patton 

Coordinator of Verbatim Transcribers Angela Butler 

Transcribers Heather Peck, Alice Gabel, MicheUe Newman 

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Copy Editors Martha Cooper, Beverly Salmon, Phyllis Weeby, Patty Meyers 

Marjorie Pierson, Dick Thomburg 

Verbatim Proofreader/Channel B Identifiers John Thomburg, Bob McClean 

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Production Manager Billy Murphy 

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Sales Representatives BarbaraAcuff, Aneal Joseph, Marge Poteete 

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village (Karim Maude) was completely [burned]," includ- 
ing 15 United Methodist churches and schools. At least 
130 persons died; church members were displaced, ren- 
dered homeless and hungry. He asked for prayers and 
support for "all of Africa." 

Wilham Hinson, Texas Conference, asked for a point of 
personal privilege to "express pain as a member of this 
covenant community" over the statement of 15 bishops 
expressmg their concern over "proscnptions in the Dis- 
cipline against gays and lesbians within our church and 
within our ordained ministers." He urged the remaining 
bishops to "reassure us of your support for the Dtsapltne 
and laws of our church." 

Before turning to the business agenda. Bishop Sherer 
asked delegates to discuss one-on-one their hopes for the 
next few hours, God's hopes; and then pray together. She 
called on Portland Area Bishop Wilham W. Dew Jr., 
General Council on Ministnes president. 

GCOM Report 

Bishop Dew reminded delegates that the GCOM and 
the General Council on Finance and Administration are 
the only two agencies that report directly to the confer- 
ence floor, rather than through committees. As an intro- 
duction to the GCOM, Bishop Dew catalogued a long hst 
of "listening to the church" efforts by general agencies, 
bishops and others through studies conducted over the 
past four to eight years, coordinated in part by GCOM. 
He also listed six proposals being considered to enhance 
ethnic ministries. He praised the general boards and 
agencies for their dedication and diligence, reflected in 
their reports to GCOM identifying key programs and 
initiatives by each one. 

In a dramatic moment. Bishop Dew released the po- 
dium to Paul Dirdak, chair of the Interagency Task Force 
on AIDS, and Helen Worth, a task force member who said 
"God has been preparing me for this moment." She gave 
a moving account of her discovery that a blood transfusion 
had made her HIV positive, her subsequent acceptance 
by her church and her growing knowledge of and teaching 
ministry about AIDS. "Let God do the judgmg," she said. 
"All we have to do is love," She received a standing 
ovation. 

Before returning to legislative committee work, dele- 
gates learned that U.S. First Lady Hillary Rodham Clin- 
ton a lifelong United Methodist, will address the 
conference Wednesday, April 24, at 2 p.m. Warm ap- 
plause greeted the announcement, 

— Roger Burgess 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No.5 



115 



Disciple Celebrates 10 Years of Transforming Lives 



On Wednesday evening, General Conference delegates 
and visitors gathered to celebrate the 10th anniversary of 
Disciple Bible Study. It was an opportunity for the church 
to celebrate a "dream" that began in Flower Mound 
Texas In March 1986, a group of pastors, theologians, 
lay persons, a bishop, Christian educators, Bible scholars, 
publishers, editors and marketers shaped the vision that 
is now known as "Disciple: Becoming Disciples Through 
Bible Study." 

The study was devel- 
oped with the behef that 
people hunger for God's 
word and for the opportu- 
nity to meet in small 
groups to share their jour- 
ney of faith- The study's 
goal is to help biblically lit- 
erate people grow into dis- 
ciples of Jesus Christ. 
More than 20,000 persons 
have been trained to lead 
Disciple groups, and more 
than 400,000 persons have 
participated in the 34- 
week study. Disciple is 
now available in Enghsh, 
German, Korean, Manda- 
rin Chinese and Spanish- Training events have been held 
in Australia, Canada, England, Germany, Korea, Malay- 
sia, Singapore, several countries in South America and 
the United States. 

The Disciple celebration began with fellowship, food 
and "birthday cake," as persons enthusiastically shared 
their Disciple experiences. Participants renewed friend- 
ships. Bonds developed as people realized they had a 
"shared experience" even if they lived thousands of miles 
apart. 

The celebration moved to the ballroom for a 20-minute 
visual presentation of the Disciple story. Neil Alexander, 
president and publisher of The United Methodist Publish- 
ing House (UMPH), welcomed guests and hosted the 




event. Guests heard reflections by persons who were at 
the 1986 "dreaming" session and from key leaders. 

Mr. Alexander recalled: "December 1992. The dream 
is in full flower A third gathering of laity and Bible 
scholars, bishops, marketers, clergy, pubhshers and edi- 
tors. Each had a story, and their witness was one: God is 
at work through Disciple. Slowly but surely, we are 
becoming a people of the Book. Experience confirmed 
direction. The people are 
ready to confront and be con- 
fronted by the hard words of 
the prophets. They are hun- 
gry for the meat of Paul's 
gospel. So the thu-d Disciple 
study takes shape, and its 
message is direct. Call 
home." The crowd ap- 
plauded enthusiastically at 
the announcement of the 
third phase, which will be 
available this summer 

The evening concluded 
with a presentation by the 
former UMPH president and 
publisher, Robert K. Feas- 
„^^„ -Mhrn. ter, to Bishop Richard B. 
pi^Bn.dM^ Wilke and Julia Wilke for 
their contribution to the writing and development of 
Disciple. The Wilkes expressed their appreciation for Mr. 
Feaster's leadership and vision. Julia Wilke also paid 
tribute to two key contributors to Disciple's success; 
Nelhe Moser, editor, and Wini Grizzle, program director. 
The impact of Disciple cannot be overstated. It has 
been mentioned in the Laity and Episcopal addresses and 
in many conversations at General Conference. Ten years 
after its beginning. Disciple is helping to shape the direc- 
tion of the church. 

—Bradford L. Motta 




pbotaABkeDuBaae 



116 



April 20, 1996 



Your Guide to General Conference 
Terms 

ADCA: Advance editions of the Daily Christian 
Advocate Volume one contains reports and petitions 
from annual conferences and agencies, and volume 
two contains petitions from all others. 

Ccdendar Item: the chronological number of com- 
mittee items submitted to the calendar secretary- 
appearing in the DCA 

Consent Calendars: three groups of calendar 
items that received overwhelming support from leg- 
islative committees (no more than five votes in op- 
position) The groupings are: 1) concurrence with 
proposed changes m the Discipline; 2) concurrence 
on non-Disciplinary petitions; 3) non-concurrence on 
all matters. 

DCA Daily Christian Advocate, a daily record pub- 
lished during General Conference that contains 
news, features, calendar items and a verbatim record 
of everything said m plenary sessions. 

Legislative Committee Item: a number tempo- 
rarily assigned to a petition or group of petitions 
enacted by a committee prior to being assigned a 
calendar number. 

Legislative Committee Recorders: volunteers 
who input committee action into the Petition Elec- 
tronic Tracking System. 

Legislative Committee Reporters: volunteers 
who provide brief summaries of action for the Daily 
Christian Advocate. 

Minority Report: When 10 persons or 10 percent 
of a committee (whichever is fewer) disagree with a 
committee recommendation, they may file a minority 
report that is given the same calendar number as the 
recommendation of the majority. 

Petitions: requests from individuals, churches, 
annual conferences and agencies for changes in the 
Book of Discipline , the Book of Resolutions , or other 
aspects of the general church. Petition numbers 
identify the chronological order in which they were 
received, paragraph or topic, and source (see ADCA 
page 83). 



Can You Top This? 

In the April 18 DCA, we mentioned Herman Will, 
who has attended 14 General Conferences and two 
Uniting Conferences. So far, no one has claimed to 
beat his record. 

Now we're mterested in other categories. 

We're looking for the youngest delegate, the oldest 
delegate, delegates who are related to each other, the 
largest number of delegates from the same local 
church, the delegate who traveled the greatest dis- 
tance to get to Denver, the delegate with the most 
hair-raising story of misadventures enroute to Den- 
ver, and the list goes on. 

If you'd like to add your name and story to the "Can 
You Top This?" hall of fame, send a note to Barbara 
Dunlap-Berg at the DCA. We'll try to publish one 
"wmner" a day during the remainder of General 
Conference. 



Comic Relief 



Day 1: Delegates carry (in their arms) copies of 
their Z)Ci4s. 

Days 2-3: Delegates carry briefcases and tote bags 
filled with DCAs and other resources. 

Days 4-5: Delegates pull luggage carts and wheeled 
suitcases crammed withDCAs, resources, special-in- 
terest group literature and souvenirs. 

Next week: Watch out! Delegates will be driving 
minivans to haul all the stuff. 

— Dawn M. Hand 



Do you want the cat or the ball? 

The legislative-committee language of concur- 
rence and non-concurrence can easily elude the 
sharpest delegate. The Independent Commissions 
Legislative Committee was bailed out of a quandary 
by an observer, the Rev. Pat Looper, Riverdale, Ga., 
who is also a former member of the National Asso- 
ciation of Parliamentarians. 

Faced with how to handle a substitute motion and 
how that might affect concurrence/non-concurrence 
and after hearing multiple opinions from committee 
members on what substitution means, the chair 
turned to Ms. Looper. 

In parhamentary language, she explained what the 
committee had done, then put the process in the 
language of the "parliamentarily challenged." 

"You have a ball; now you want to substitute a cat. 
If you vote for the substitute, now you have a cat. You 
have now decided that you wanted a cat. You have 
voted on and decided for the cat. You now have to 
vote on the main motion which, again, is the cat!" 
— Ann Whiting and Kristin Knudson Harris 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No.5 



117 



World Wide Web Broadens the Community of Faith 



As the church moves toward the future, technology is 
broadening the community of faith in exciting new ways. 
Thanks to the World Wide Web, the excitment of General 
Conference is spreading for the first time to a world 
without borders. This year's General Conference pro- 
ceedings, news and information can be expenenced by 
anyone with a computer, a modem and a few free minutes. 
This addition to General Conference has been many 
years in the making. In 1983 several denominations 
began experimenting with the use of electronic mail to 
create new communication opportunities on the elec- 
tronic frontier This program was called Computer Based 
Communications (CBC). From the 12 people who signed 
up initially, more than 10,000 persons from 22 denomina- 
tions enrolled in CBC's successor, the Ecumenical Net- 
work, as well as its Umted Methodist affiliate, the Circuit 
Writer Network. 

The World Wide Web, the interactive graphics and 
multimedia network, where much of the recent explosive 
growth of the internet has occurred, is the newest frontier 
to communicate the gospel message. Today more than 
250 United Methodist churches, as well as hundreds of 
annual conferences, districts and ministries beyond the 
local church are connected to the World Wide Web. Gen- 
eral boards and agencies, Umted Methodist News Service 
and other church entities are also a part of this growing 
outreach. Through the CompuServe system, Cokebury 
offers a complete online version of the Daily Christian 
Advocate. (The DCA is free to Cokesbury online users). 

The use of computers at General Conference has grown 
significantly, due to the work of a dedicated group of 
people. The heart and soul of the system is the Petition 



Bishop Woodie White Leads 
Council of Bishops 

On Thursday, the Council of Bishops elected Indi- 
ana Area Bishop Woodie W. White and Wisconsin 
Area Bishop Sharon Zimmerman Rader president and 
secretary respectively. In accepting the leadership of 
the 130-member council of active and retired United 
Methodist bishops. Bishop White acknowledged the 
valuable examples of his predecessors, particularly 
Los Angeles Area Bishop Roy I. Sano, outgoing coun- 
cil president. 

Asking his episcopal colleagues to remember him 
in their daily prayers, Bishop White said he will seek 
to serve with "honor and distinction this body which 
I hold in such high regard." 

Elected to a four-year term, Bishop Rader succeeds 
San Francisco Area Bishop Melvin G. Talbert. Re- 
tired Bishop Jack M. Tuell, Greenbank, Wash., was 
named assistant to the secretary. 

In later action, the council nominated Bishop 
Emerito P. Nacpil, Manila, as president-designate for 
1997. Council presidents traditionally serve one- 
year terms. 

— Lynm DeMichele 



Entry and Retrieval System (PETS). PETS is the brain- 
child of John Brawn, a professional computer programmer 
from San Jose, Calif. He created the mammoth data base 
from which the General Conference system operates. 
Every one of the thousands of petitions submitted to 
General Conference was entered into this system, and 
each can be tracked every step of the way throughout 
General Conference. 

Dr. Susan Brumbaugh, the "webmaster" of the General 
Conference internet homepage, transfers all information 
to the World Wide Web page. She is excited about what 
is bemg done this year. During the 1992 General Confer- 
ence, persons could call a toll-free number for information 
on petitions and other work of the conference. This line 
was staffed by one person. In 1996, access via the internet 
IS virtually unlimited. "This year someone can sit at home 
and watch the 1996 Discipline as it [is developed]," Dr. 
Brumbaugh said. 

The task of putting information on the internet is her- 
culean. You can see the results of these efforts at the 
computer stations throughout the convention center or 
on the internet at the address http://www.gbgm- 
umc.org/GC. The internet is demonstrated daily at 1:30 
p.m. in the Press Room (Balfroom 1, lower level). Get 
tickets for this event at the Press Room registration desk. 
As the church looks toward the new millenium, the 
internet gives us a ghmpse of the future — and a remark- 
able new tool in reaching the world with the message of 
God's love. 

— David Persons 

— ? ? BlesseJ Be the Women: Be Counted! ? ? — 

Observations from Legislative Committees Thursday and Friday: 

• Higher Ed & Chap - Com action on Univ Senate & seminary 
monitoring: Males are 69% of committee and made 83% of 
comments. We affirm intentional and repeated efforts of 
Chairperson to encourage inclusive participation. 

• Ministry - Com action on ordination proposals: 

Near parity in representation and participation - females are 
38%> of the committee and made 32% of the comments. 

• Independent Commissions - Com action on some COCU 
and Christian Unity petitions: Men are 57% of committee 
and made 78% of comments. In action on GCSRW items, 
women were 52% of committee at that time and made 32% 
of comments. 

Observations of unconscious behaviors that can exclude: 

Stepping on ends of others' sentences; interrupting and taking 
response opportunities from others; not waiting to be 
recognized before approaching microphone and speaking. 

Celebration: We celebrated many committee chairpersons who 
regularly check with monitors to "see how they are doing" in 
building inclusive participation. Most are surprised at what 
data show, but all have been eager for feedback and 
intentionally apply learnings. Blessed be.'!! 

Information provided by the General Commission on the Status and Role of Women 



118 



April 20, 1996 



Judicial Council Decisions 



DECISION NUMBER 778 



IN RE: Meaning, Application and Effect of Pars. 270.2 
and 735, With Specific Reference to Eligibility of Other- 
wise Qualified Spouse of A Bishop to Serve on the Juris- 
dictional Committee on Episcopacy. 

DIGEST" 

There is no disciplinary provision prohibiting an other- 
wise qualified spouse of a bishop from serving on the 
Jurisdictional Committee on Episcopacy. However, it 
would appear unwise for such spouse to serve on the 
Jurisdictional Committee on Episcopacy as such service 
could present a real or potential conflict of interest, or an 
appearance of impropriety. 

STATEMENT OF FACTS 

The Pacific Northwest Conference has petitioned the 
Judicial Council for a declaratory decision inteipreting the 
meaning, application and effect of Pars. 270.2 and 735, 
with specific reference to eligibility of an otherwise quali- 
fied spouse of a bishop to serve on the Jurisdictional 
Committee on Episcopacy. 

Jurisdiction 



This and related issues are matters which the General 
Conference should address in specific legislation. 

Decision 

There is no disciplinary provision prohibiting an other- 
wise qualified spouse of a bishop from serving on the 
Jurisdictional Committee on Episcopacy. However, it 
would appear unwise for such spouse to serve on the 
Jurisdictional Committee on Episcopacy as such service 
could present a real or potential conflict of interest, or an 
appearance of impropriety. 

April 18, 1996 

Signed by Tom Matheny, president, and Wayne Coffin, 
secretary 



DECISION NO. 781 

IN RE: Petition from the General Council on Fi- 
nance and Administration for a Declaratory Decision 
as to the Constitutionality, Meaning, Application, and 
Effect of Paragraphs 507.1 and 923 of the 1992I»tsc»- 
pline as They Affect the Date on Which Newly- 
Elected Bishops Receive Salary from the Episcopal 
Fund. 



The Judicial Council has jurisdiction under Par. 2616 of 
the 1992 Dtsapltne. 

Analysis 

The Discipline is silent on the particular issue raised. 
Par. 623, which delineates the composition and responsi- 
bihties of the Jurisdictional Committee on Episcopacy, 
does not address this issue. Par. 270.2 pertains to the 
Pastor-Pansh Relations (Staff-Pansh Relations) Commit- 
tee of a local church or charge. Par. 735 pertains to the 
Conference Committee on the Episcopacy. 

Pars. 270.2 and 735 are instructive. Par. 270.2 prohibits 
an immediate family member of a pastor or staff member 
from serving on the Pastor-Parish Relations (Staff-Parish 
Relations) Committee. Similarly, Par. 735 prohibits im- 
mediate family members or the stafi of any conference 
agency from serving on the Conference Committee on 
Episcopacy, with specified exceptions. 

The rationale for the above cited prohibitions is that 
service on these respective committees by the prohibited 
individuals would present a real or potential conflict of 
interest. The same rationale would suggest that it would 
be unwise for an otherwise qualified spouse of a bishop to 
serve on the Junsdictional Committee on Episcopacy. 



DIGEST 

Pars. 507.1 and 923 of the 1992 Discipline are 
constitutional, as they follow the direction of Pars. 15 
and 25 of the Constitution in making plans for the 
support of the bishops of the church. 

STATEMENT OF FACTS 

The 1992 General Conference adopted the report 
of the General Council on Finance and Administration 
which included the following sentence: "The salary 
of a bishop newly elected in 1992 shall begin on 
September 1, 1992." Similar legislation is proposed 
to the 1996 General Conference. The General Coun- 
cil on Finance and Administration took action to peti- 
tion the Judicial Council for a Declaratory Decision on 
whether the General Conference has the authority to 
adopt rules which set September 1 of the year of 
election as the beginning date for the salary of newly- 
elected bishops. 

At an oral hearing on Saturday, April 13, 1996, 
Bishop Jack Tuell appeared for the Council of Bishops 
and Mary K. Logan appeared for the General Council 
on Finance and Administration. 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No.5 



119 



(Judicial Council Decisions continued) 

Theodore H Walter recused himself and did not par- 
ticipate in any of the proceedings related to this decision 

Junsdiction 

The Judicial Council has junsdiction under Par. 2616 of 
the 1992 Dtsapttne. 

Analysis 

Par. 15 states that "[t]he General Conference shall have 
full legislative power over all matters distinctively con- 
nectional." Following this statement is a list of specific 
powers granted to the General Conference which in- 
cludes '[t]o define and fix the powers, duties, and pnvi- 
leges of the episcopacy, to adopt a plan for the support of 
the bishops, to provide a uniform rule for their retire- 
ment, and to provide for the discontmuance of a bishop 
because of inefficiency or unacceptability " Further, Par 
25 states that one of the responsibilities of the Jurisdic- 
tional Conferences is "to elect bishops and to cooperate 
in carrying out such plans for their support as may be 
determined by the General Conference " Par 17, one of 
the Restnctive Rules, states that "[t]he General Confer- 
ence shall not change or alter any part or rule of our 
government so as to do away with episcopacy or destroy 
the plan of our itinerant general supenntendency " 

Pnor to 1976 newly-elected bishops were appointed to 
an episcopal area where their duties began immediately. 
Since 1976, the appointment to an episcopal area is effec- 
tive on September 1 of the year of election. From 1976 to 
1988, bishops were paid salary and other expenses from 
the Episcopal Fund from the date of consecration. Begin- 
ning in 1988 and continuing to the present, the salary has 
been paid from September 1 of the year of election. 

Par. 506 states that the "consecration of bishops may 
take place at the session of the conference at which 
election occurs or at a place and time designated by the 
conference." This paragraph clearly assumes that conse- 
cration of newly-elected bishops may take place at a time 
other than the session of the Jurisdictional or Central 
Conference. Par. 49 gives to the General Conference the 
power to set the time and place for the bishops elected by 
the jurisdictions, and the Central Conferences the power 
to do the same for those elected by the Central Confer- 



Par. 15 requires that the General Conference estabhsh 
a "uniform rule" for the retirement of bishops. Par. 509.1 
provides for bishops to be retired on August 31 following 
the regular session of the Junsdictional Conference. Be- 
cause of this provision, it is logical for the Discipline to 
provide in Par. 507.1 that September 1 of the same year 
is the date on which all episcopal assignments made at 
Junsdictional Conference become effective. The approxi- 



mately six-week period between election and consecra- 
tion and September 1 enables a newly-elected bishop to 
conclude matters at the pnor appointment and make an 
orderly transition to assumption of the duties of the 
episcopal area. This is analogous to the way clergy mem- 
bers of an Annual Conference receive new appointments 
at the Annual Conference session but move to the new 
appointment at a later date 

In clear recognition that the bishops are general super- 
intendents from the time of their consecration, funds are 
provided for travel and certain other expenses from the 
Episcopal Fund. Par. 527 states that bishops "are elected 
general superintendents of the whole Church..., so bish- 
ops become through their election members first of the 
Council of Bishops before they are subsequently assigned 
to areas of service." 

As set forth in the 1992 Discipline Par. 923, bishops are 
paid from the Episcopal Fund, and the General Council on 
Finance and Administration recommends to the General 
Conference the budget for the Episcopal Fund. In adopt- 
ing the recommendation of the General Council on Fi- 
nance and Administration, the General Conference 
makes "plans for their support" as required by Pars. 15 
and 25. It clearly is the responsibihty of the General 
Conference to make these plans. The present plan may 
be unwieldy, cumbersome, vague, unfair, and/or unwise, 
but none of those things necessarily renders it unconsti- 
tutional. 

The lack of any definition of effective bishop in the 
Discipline at present means that any plan of support for 
bishops recommended by the General Council on Finance 
and Administration must make assumptions about that 
definition. The present plan, and the plan recommended 
to the 1996 General Conference, assume that bishops 
become effective when they begin their residential and 
presidential supervision of the assigned episcopal area. It 
is the responsibility of the General Conference, not the 
Judicial Council, to determine what is meant by the term 
"effective bishops" in Par. 923 and whether the assump- 
tion of Genera] Council on Finance and Administration is 
correct. In the context of the present plan of support, a 
person elected to the episcopacy is assumed to continue 
receiving a salary from the prior appointment from mid- 
July to September 1. When the General Conference de- 
termines the date a bishop becomes effective, it must also 
determine the source of the salary of the effective bishop. 

Par. 505 refers only to bishops who are assigned to 
episcopal areas for residential and presidential supervi- 
sion. It does not determine the total number of bishops in 
The United Methodist Church. As long as there is only 
one bishop assigned to an episcopal area, the total number 
of bishops m the period from the consecration of new 
bishops in mid-July until September 1 creates no Disci- 
plinary problem 



120 



April 20, 1996 



Gudicial Council Decisions continued) 



Decision 



Pars. 507.1 and 923 of the \332 Discipline are constitu- 
tional, as they follow the direction of Pars. 15 and 25 of 
the Constitution in making plans for the support of the 
bishops of the church. 

April 18, 1996 

Signed by Tom Matheny, president, and Wayne Coffin, 
secretary. 

Supplementary Opinion 

I agree for the most part, with the opinion of the 
majority. 

However, there are observations that I must make. 

First, I believe that it must be clear that a person 
becomes a bishop when consecrated, regardless of the 
definition of "effective." This is correct theologically and 
from the disciplinary point of view. 

Second, every piece of legislation by an Annual Confer- 
ence or the General Conference must meet the test, "Is 
it fair?" 

It is not fair for a person to be consecrated a bishop and 
not be paid unmediately. 

It is not fair for a previous appointment to bear this 
burden m the interim period. 

It IS not fair for the General Conference to have the 
responsibility for a program of financial support, and to do 
it without money. 

It is not fair for the General Council on Finance and 
Administration to, in effect, amend legislation by means 
of a budget item without carefully explaining this to the 
General Conference. 

Signed, Tom Matheny 



Top Ten Things You Will Never Experience at 
General Conference 

10. A Good eight hour sleep. 
9. Someone without an opinion. 
8. A Cokesbury going out of business sale 
7. A rummage sale to pay for the expenses of 

General Conference 
6. A request that worship begin at 7 a.m. so 

everything will get done. 
5. Hear someone say, "Do what you want, 

anything will be fine with me." 
4. An announcement of the daily winning lottery 

numbers. 
3. A unanimous vote on any issue dealing with 

sexuality. 
2. A dress-down day when everyone wears jeans. 
1. An announcement by the presiding bishop, 

saying "Let's Party!!!" 

—BradMotta 



Statement on Violence 
in the Middle East 

General Conference after General Conference has con- 
demned the ever-increasing cycles of violence in the Mid- 
dle East The current violence around south Lebanon has 
surged to heartbreaking levels. We are appalled by the 
scale of the Israeli assault upon the people of Lebanon. The 
extensive damage and many casualties that Israel has in- 
flicted upon Lebanon far exceed a proportionate response 
to the Katyusha rocket attacks against Israel. Self-defense 
IS not a legitimate justification for so massive and calculated 
an effort to drive up to 400,000 civiUans from their homes, 
or to stage direct attacks upon power plants and civilian 
infrastructure far from the border. 

The Israeli campaign against Lebanon has led to a severe, 
premeditated humanitarian crisis intended to bring political 
pressure on the governments of Lebanon and of Syria who 
are viewed as supporting Hezbollah. A strategy that holds 
the entire population hostage to armed attack must be 
condemned as totally unacceptable and in grave violation 
of international standards for the protection of civilians in 
times of conflict. Innocent people are being punished in a 
massive reprisal for attacks on Israeli civilians by Hezbol- 
lah. We condemn the attacks by Hezbollah. We beUeve that 
reprisals do not act as a deterrent to more violence, but 
only escalate it further. In like manner, we cannot be silent 
about Palestine while that community struggles to survive 
in the midst of such violations as the: 
■• Ongoing confiscation of Palestinian lands; 

• Continued growth of Israeli settlement communities in 
the West Bank and East Jerusalem and the construction 
of bypass roads which isolate Palestinian towns and 
villages; 

• Sealing and demolition of Palestinian homes; 

• Administrative detention of men, women and minors 
without the right to a fair trial; and 

• Continuing imprisonment of thousands of Palestinians 
in Israeli prisons. 

All these sufferings during fifty years of Israeli occupa- 
tion of Palestine have been made more acute since the 
suicide bombings in Jerusalem, Ashkelon and Tel Aviv. It 
is as if the Oslo Peace Accords had never been signed. 

We call for the protection of the children, the youth and 
other civilians. 

We call for a return to normalcy for people who have been 
refugees or subjugated in their own land for the past three 
generations. 

We call for Christians, Jews and Muslims to be able to 
practice their faiths in the city which is holy to the three 
major monotheistic religions of the world. 

Lastly, we call for increased efforts to assure geographic 
security, economic security and political security — all of 
which are necessary for Israelis, Palestinians and Lebanese 
to co-exist. 

—Judith Craig 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No.5 



121 



HOW DO THEY DO THAT? 



Meeting in the Oddest Places 



How do all those names and graphics appear on the 
giant television screens in the plenary sessions of General 
Conference' 

Behind the metal doors of the plenary session, an 
inconspicuous truck labeled "Mountain Mobile Televi- 
sion" IS parked. Inside, a crew of local professionals, 
United Methodist staff and United Methodist volunteers 
are presenting the images to the delegates. Along with 
the images, the giant television screens also show the 
names of each presenter and speaker on the conference 
floor. 

General Conference producer Jay Voorhees, the direc- 
tor and the technical director work in the truck's first 
room. In the second room, audio for musicians and speak- 
ers is monitored. Actual taping occurs in the third room. 
Mr. Voorhees explained that he and his crew provide 
image magnification with an Eidephor projector, which 
sends a broadcast of the event to monitors throughout the 
convention center as well as to monitors on the floor. 

— Marcy Barnes 



Joys and Concerns 

Congratulations to Bishop L. Beveljones HI, presi- 
dent of the North American section of the World 
Methodist Council (WMC); William K. Quick, pastor 
of Metropolitan United Methodist Church, Detroit; 
and Mary Hale, wife of WMC general secretary Joe 
Hale, for being selected as recipients of the WMC 
seat of honor at an April 19 luncheon in Denver. 

Please be in prayer for Barbara Rose, lay delegate 
from the Kansas West Conference, whose husband 
died April 19. 



Who would have guessed that Charles Whittle, 
Northwest Texas Conference delegate, and Mochell 
Hughes, DCA staff, would end up meeting in the 
emergency room of Denver General Hospital 
(DGH)? 

On Thursday morning, several General Confer- 
ence attendees exchanged smiles and conversation 
while they sat at DGH. Charles was waiting for his 
wife, Joan, who was receiving stitches after a fall. 
Sitting with him were Ed and Ann Hill, also of the 
Northwest Texas Conference. Mochell was accom- 
panying Heather Peck, DCA staff, who fractured her 
foot. An unidentified delegate was being treated for 
hypertension. 

Dr. Wyatt Decker reported that the hospital had 
seen a steady stream of General Conference atten- 
dees. Fortunately, none had severe injuries. He 
added that it's common for them to see several pa- 
tients dunng an event such as General Conference, 
since DGH is just a few blocks away. 

Kathy Deasy, R.N., reported treating three other 
General Conference patients Wednesday night. She 
said our name badges informed her that we were with 
"that convention." 

Convention center paramedics said they had 
treated delegates for mild shortness of breath, rashes 
and itching, and lacerations, according to Dave Bron- 
son, operations supervisor for paramedics. 

—Mochell Hughes 



United Methodists Aren't Drinking Enough! 
First Aid Crew Offers Advice 



Along with bumps and bruises, the first-aid crew is 
preparing for cases of dehydration. They warn that the 
high altitude and the busy General Conference schedule 
can be hazardous to one's health. Effects of dehydration 
are usually experienced four or five days after arriving in 
the higher altitude. Warning signs include headaches, 
less-frequent urination and bright yellow urine. Left un- 
checked, dehydration can lead to confusion and disonen- 
tation, lightheadedness, fainting and shock. 

Participants are encouraged to: 

— avoid beverages containing caffeine (coffee, soft 
dnnks) and chocolate; 

— drink plenty of water or fruit juice. 

However, because of the electronic voting system, 
delegates are not permitted to take water to their seats. 
Therefore, dnnking water dunng breaks and between 
sessions is vitally important. 



Other health problems experienced by those attending 
the conference include: 

— high blood pressure brought on by irregular and poor 
diet, lack of sleep and stress; 

—diarrhea or constipation because of the diet change; 

— blisters due to long walks in improper footwear; 

— earaches as a result of the high-altitude adjustment. 

Gerri Evans, registered nurse, cautions participants to 
watch out for steps, which have resulted in falls and 
consequent cuts and abrasions. That warning is particu- 
larly important as people step up and down sidewalk 
curbs. Beware of lie curbs in front of the center. The 
DCA thanks paramedics Bill Wise and Cory Richards for 
their healthful advice. 

General Conference business is important, but don't 
neglect yourself. Take care of God's creation, YOU! 

—BradMotta 



122 



April 20, 1996 



Cuban Bishop Describes Suffering 
in Wake of U.S. Embargo 



Every day, Cuban Methodist Bishop Gustavo Cruz 
passes hungry children crying for milk in the streets of 
Havana. Poor people in Cuba die for lack of medicine, and 
people come to church in tattered clothes and shoes that 
are falling apart, he said 

Bishop Cruz was in Denver for the General Conference 
of The United Methodist Church, with which the 10,000- 
member Cuban Methodist Church is affiliated 

In an interview with United Methodist News Service, 
Bishop Cruz said he agrees with those U.S. Chnstians 
who are asking the U.S. government to end the embargo 
against Cuba. He emphasized that he was speaking for 
himself, not on behalf of the Cuban church. 

Bishop Cruz, who was consecrated as a bishop m 
March, wept dunng the interview as he recalled a friend 
who died 18 days after prostate cancer surgery because 
the Cuban hospital had no antibiotics. 

"I don't blame the United States for the troubles be- 
tween our countries. It's probably true that the Cuban 
government is very much responsible," Bishop Cruz said, 
adding that he does not take sides in the political battle, 
but considers himself on the side of Jesus Christ. 

Penalizing the Poor 

But, he said, the embargo is penalizing the poorest 
Cubans, not government officials. "When the Cuban offi- 
cials get sick, they have their own hospitals and access to 
the best medical care. But when a poor person gets sick, 
they die because of lack of medicine." 

Bishop Cruz suggested that the United States could 
make resumption of diplomatic relations with Cuba con- 
ditional, holding Cuba to certain requirements. 

He told stories of friends and church members who 
struggle from day to day to feed and clothe themselves. 

Despite the economic strains, the bishop said, an evan- 
gelical fervor is sweeping the country. "The spirit of Jesus 
Chnst IS bnnging thousands to church," he added. 

Bishop Cruz estimated that 80 percent of Cuban Chns- 
tians are youth and young adults. The Cuban Methodist 
Church has at least 200 organized congregations, with at 
least 100 more house churches or informal ministries 
brmgmg even more people to the faith. Christians also 
work ecumenically, in such organizations as the Council 
of Cuban Churches, the Caribbean Council of Churches 
and the Council of Evangelical Methodist Churches in 
Latin America. 

Seeking Relationships with Christ 

"It is amazing that our young people have been taught 
nothing about the faith in the secular, government 
schools, yet many of them are seeking a relationship with 
Christ," he said He recalled a young woman, a high-rank- 
ing official m the Communist youth organization, who 




Bishop Gustavo Cruz of Cuba visits with Rita Will. 



photo Brad Motta 



came to his church, had "a life-changing experience" and 
became a Christian. 

Bishop Cruz said relations between Chnstian churches 
and the Cuban government have been relatively good 
since 1991. He admitted, however, that tensions have 
increased since the downing of an anti-Castro dissident 
group's plane by the Cuban military earlier this year. He 
said Castro's government has cracked down on tourists 
coming to Cuba claiming to be church workers because 
many of them preach anti-government sentiments. 

Since 1984, 'The United Methodist Church has been on 
record as supporting resumed economic and diplomatic 
relations between the United States and Cuba. The 1996 
General Conference is considenng petitions from at least 
three regional United Methodist bodies — the Wyoming, 
Wisconsin and Nebraska annual conferences — to reiter- 
ate the call. 

— M. Garltndai 




The choir from First Unied Methodist Church m Peona. III., ofiered the 
music lor Friday's morning worship. 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No.5 



123 



Berkeley UMC, Denver, Works 
Toward Becoming More Inclusive 

In many communities across the United States, the 
number of Hispanics is increasmg, along with the need to 
provide ministnes for and with this growmg population. 
For five years, Berkeley United Methodist Church, Den- 
ver, has taken on this challenge. 

Historically a predominantly White congregation, 
Berkeley Church faced the reality of a changing commu- 
nity. With the gradual influx of Hispanics to the neigh- 
borhood, new ministries were needed. Addressing this 
need, the Rocky Mountain Conference sent missionary 
Lucia Guzman to the congregation. Ms. Guzman is now 
director of the Denver coalition of Christian churches. 

"We are committed to being a multicultural community 
of faith," said the Rev. Justo Gonzalez, current pastor of 
the congregation. For more than two years, Mr. Gonzalez 
has dedicated time and energy to implementing the Na- 
tional Plan for Hispanic Ministry. 

"One of our most exciting programs is Saturday Chris- 
tian Children Society," he added. The popular weekly 
program draws 20 to 25 neighborhood children for lunch, 
Bible study and recreation. 

Berkeley Church's Sunday school attendance has m- 
creased, and other churches have been inspired to get 
involved. Highlands Umted Methodist Church, for exam- 
ple, provides transportation for the children. "Their help 
is a clear recognition that we all need to be involved in 
Hispanic ministries," Mr. Gonzalez said. 

Berkeley Church's youth-outreach program, "Friday 
Night at the Movies," offers a much needed alternative to 
"hanging out" on the streets. "We . . . gather for a 
community meal that the kids cook," the pastor said. 
Then participants watch a movie that deals with youth- 
oriented issues and discuss it from a Christian perspec- 
tive. 

The program is funded by the Women's Division, Gen- 
eral Board of Global Ministries, and King Soopers grocery 
store, which provides free rental movies. 

Berkeley Church also tries to educate persons about 
Hispanic ministry. Of particular interest are primarily 
White congregations whose demographic studies show a 
need for Hispanic ministry. 

— Adrian Vega 



Corrections 



Add to list of guest preachers: First UMC Colorado 
Springs, 8:25 a.m. - William Quick, 10:55 a.m. - Kirbyjon 
Caldwell. 

P. 84, 2nd column, 4th para, 5th line, the name Dient 
Grain should be Dight Grain. 

Add the foUowing to the GCFA Report No. 1, World 
Service Fund to p. 289 of the Advance DCA following the 
Iglesia Metodista Autonoma Afiliada de Puerto Rico Block 
Grant paragraph: 

University/College Fund. The General Board of 
Higher Education and Ministry makes grants from this fund 
to aid United Methodist educational institutions which 
could benefit from temporary assistance as they take steps 
to develop stable funding patterns and/or to reexamine 
their educational mission. "The General Board of Higher 
Education and Ministry reports on the use of the fund to 
the General Council on Finance and Administsration annu- 
ally. 



Higher Education and Chaplaincy 

Concurred with petitions in DCA, volume 1, page 823, to 
amend par. 1511: 

Number 21277. Standards for Endorsement for Ministry 
Settings. Amend the first sentence of par. 1511.^. 

Number 21274. The Division of Chaplains and Related 
Ministries. Amend par. 1511.1. 

Number 21276. General Oversight for Clergy Members. 
Amend the last sentence of par. 1511.2d. 

DCA, volume 1, page 821: 

Number 21662 pertaining to the Annual Conference 
Board of Higher Education and Campus Ministry. The 
committee rejected the deletion to Dtsctpline paragraph 
732. As a result, the committee then voted nonconcurrance 
with all other petitions dealing with the structure of the 
Annual Conference Board ofHigher Education and Campus 
Mimstry. 

Nonconcurred with petitions: 

Number 20631 to delete words World Service from first 
sentence of par. 1512. 

Number 21275 to change the language of par. 1511.2c. 

Number 20479 to eliminate the Annual Conference 
Board ofHigher Education and Campus Ministry. 



124 



April 20, 1996 



Correction 

The text of petition number 21549-GJ-2625.1-D printed 
on page 1492 of the Advance Edition of the Daily Christian 
Advocate is in error. The text should read as follows: 
Delete H 2625. ircj and replace with new text: 
Respondent shall have the right to be present at all 
hearings to be conducted by the Committee on Inves- 
tigation. Respondent shall have the right to confront 
and cross-examine witnesses, including the person 
or persons bringing the grievance or presenting evi- 
dence against the respondent. Respondent shall have 
the right to call and examine witnesses. 

Additional Petition 

112626 

Petition Number: 23077-GJ-2626.1-D; Ad. Board, St. 
Paul UMC. Coronado, CA 

Trial Procedures 

Delete the first sentence of 2626.1/ and replace with new 
text. 

In all cases, a respondent shall be entitled to appear 
and to be represented by counsel, who shall be either 
a lay or clergy member of The United Methodist 
Church, at the option of the respondent. 



A Night With Yellowstone 

Do you have your ticket? Then get ready for an 
evening of satire, music and fun, beginning at 8 p.m. 
Sunday! 

Members of the Blackfoot Native American commu- 
nity from Montana will open the program with tradi- 
tional music and dance from their heritage. 

From the heart of sky country and the Yellowstone 
Conference, you won't want to miss "The Montana 
Logging and Ballet Company (MLBC)," four talented 
performers who bring back the spontaneity, creativity 
and humor of the Marx Brothers. 

"Comedy usually comes from tragedy," says MLBC 
member Bob Fitzgerald, "so we make mountains out 
of molehills and molehills out of mountains. Comedy 
is the way we get to the general message: hope. 
There's hope out there." 

Also for your enjoyment, performer/artist Tim Hol- 
mes will exhibit his sculptures in the convention center 
lobby before the performance. 

Each delegate received a complimentary ticket. Ad- 
ditional tickets may be purchased for $5 in the hotel 
lobby. 



Announcements 

Rally on the Plaza, Saturday, April 20, 1996 at 11:00 
a.m. — Convention Center East Plaza, youth, young 
adults, students and seminarians will gather in worship, 
singing and skits, calling on the United Methodist Church 
to open the door to lesbian, gay and bisexual persons. 

BMCR Dinner Transportation, Sunday, April 21, 5:00 - 
7:00 p.m. Roundtrip transportation will be provided for 
everyone planning to attend the BMCR dinner. Persons 
planning to attend should be in their hotel lobby at 3:45 
p.m. Buses will begm pickup at 4:00 p.m. 

Mississippi Delegation and all former Mississippians 
get together, April 22, 5:45 p.m.. Old Spaghetti Factory, 
18th and Lawrence. 

Bishop David and Martha Lawson will be honored with 
a dinner on Monday, April 22. This appreciation celebra- 
tion will be held at the Crystal Balfroom of the Embassy 
Suite at 5:15 p.m. All delegates and friends of the Central 
and Southern Illinois areas are invited to attend. Please 
contact Cynthia Jones, Section A, Row 2, Seat 6 for res- 
ervations. A van will be at the entrance of the Convention 
Center to provide transportation and will return after the 
dinner 

Desert Southwest delegates and friends, please join us 
for dinner at The Broker Restaurant, 17th and Champs at 
5:30 p.m. on Monday, April 22, 1996. 

Philadelphia area delegates and friends are cordially 
invited to attend a dinner in honor of Bishop Susan M. 
Morrison at the Holiday Inn. Tuesday, April 23, 5:15 p.m. 
Cost $20. See Dale E. Owens or Keith Ladd for reserva- 
tions. 

The Cahfomia -Pacific Conference will gather for dinner 
at La Bonne Soupe, 1512 Lasimer St., at 5:30 p.m., Tues- 
day, April 23. Reservations by 5 p.m. Monday to Marilyn 
Huntington, Holtze Hotel 607-0125. 

Delegates and fiiends of the Central Pennsylvania Con- 
ference will hold a dinner in honor of Bishop and Mrs. 
Felton E. May on Wednesday, April 24, at 5:45 p.m., in the 
Gold Coin Room of the Marriott Hotel. 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No.5 



125 



Reports of Legislative Committees 



Church and Society — (4/19/96, 5:00 p.m.) 

The committee recommended concurrence: *Addmg to 
the Social Principles para. 71 a new sub-paragraph on 
"Sexual Harassment," which "interferes with the moral 
mission of the church"; *Deletmg from the Discipline 
paragraphs deahng with the General Board of Church and 
Society (GBCS) vacancies, officers, executive commit- 
tee, meetings, responsibilities, staff, headquarters, and 
bylaws — all of which appear in the GB bylaws; 'Revising 
Section ni, para. 8, of the "Status and Role of Women" 
resolution on providing resources m the area of family 
planning and contraception; *Amending the Social Prin- 
ciples to: — add a new sentence to "Basic Rights"; 
— change those with "handicapping conditions" to "peo- 
ple with disabilities" in the Social Creed and para. 72G; 
— shorten and strengthen the paragraph on "Animal 
Life"; — add new text to para. 72M on "Rural Life"; 
— insert sentences on family violence and abuse to para. 
71A; — amend para. 70A on "Water, Air, Soil, Minerals, 
Plants"; — substitute new text for para. 70D on "Space" 
and for 70E on "Science and Technology"; — add two 
new para. 72 sub-paragraphs on organ transplantation and 
organ donation and the "Right to Health Care"; — amend 
para. 72C to call for general and complete disarmament 
under strict international control; — change wording in 
para. 74E on civil obedience and civil disobedience. *Re- 
vising a number of resolutions in the current Book of 
Resolutions dealing with the United Nations' covenants 
and conventions, The United Methodist Church and 
peace, campaign finance reform, terrorism, and with- 
drawal of military bases from Okinawa. — Lee Ranck and 
Shanta M. Bryant 

Conferences — (4/19/96) 

The committee recommended concurrence: *To amend 
the Constitution to include the chair of the annual confer- 
ence college student organization in the membership of 
the annual conference; *To renumber paragraph 604 as 
604.1; *To amend so that the secretary of the General 
Conference determines how petitions should be sent to 
General Conference (Para. 608.1); *To add a new para- 
graph with information on how to send in petitions via fax 
or electronic mail (Para. 608.3); *To change dates for a) 
materials to be in hands of the petitions secretary, and b) 
time limitations (Para. 608.8); *To amend instructions on 
how much material a petition to General Conference may 
address (Para 697.2); *To amend paragraph to permit 
exception if changes are identical (Para. 608.2); *To 
amend paragraph to include individual members, clergy 
or lay, and local church groups (Para 608.7); *To add 
"persons from churches with small memberships" (Para. 
707.4); 'To add "the deaconesses" (Para. 35); *To edit 
for better understanding of the petitions m DCA (Para. 
608.8); *To delete Para. 608.9, add new paragraph regard- 
ing electronic access to all General Conference material 
prior to publication of the new Discipline. 

The committee recommended concurrence with amend- 
ments: 'Requiring the Secretary-Designate to insure that 
all delegates receive the DCA in their native languages 
(Para. 605); 'Providing a new formula to determine the 



numerical base for calculating the ratio of representatives 
from conferences to General, Central, Junsdictional Con- 
ferences (Para. 14) 'Allowing annual conferences to util- 
ize structures unique to their mission (Para. 15.14); 
'Following Para. 703.3; deleted "and all conference meet- 
ings" and the Architectural Guidelines. — Carolyn Simms 
and Ken Horn 

Discipleship (4/19/96) 

The committee recommended concurrence: 'Asking the 
Board of Discipleship to enable and encourage congrega- 
tions to carry out discipleship; 'Calling for revitalization 
of established congregations; 'Changing certain Disci- 
pline language so as to make it more concise and precise; 
'Emphasizing training members as to responsibilities of 
the baptismal covenant; 'Retaining current language re- 
garding "Our Theological Task; 'Adding editorial 
changes to "Ecumenical Interpretations of Doctrinal 
Standards "; '"Care of Youth" — adding language encour- 
aging youth to participate in preparation for their profes- 
sion of faith; 'Shortening the time before removing 
inactive people from membership from three to two 
years; 'Regarding membership reports and records. In- 
cludes members'addresses as part of church record keep- 
ing; 'Adopting the "meaning of membership" vows for 
profession of faith 'Amending the last paragraph of the 
proposed Para. 211 by making the last paragraph No. 7, 
and changing "may" to "shall" (7. Such persons "shall" 
also be asked to receive and profess the Christian faith . 
. .); 'Explainingtheprocessforadmissionintothechurch; 
'Adopting language explaining the church's responsibil- 
ity for caring for children and youth; 'Outlining the cir- 
cumstances under which people can be removed from the 
rolls of both baptized and professing members. 

The committee recommended concurrence with amend- 
ments: 'Defining church membership, deleting the spe- 
cific categories of people, but saying that "all persons" are 
eligible to attend worship, etc.; 'Added clarifying words 
which emphasize one comes into membership on confir- 
mation; 'Regarding qualifications for membership by add- 
ing an additional statement of faith to highlight the 
importance of Scripture, and adding wording to empha- 
size the importance of the profession of faith; 'Making 
the wording of certain worship services compatible with 
those in use by the Central Conferences; 'Delineating 
local-church guidelines for keeping membership rolls and 
reporting membership. 

The committee recommended nonconcurrence: 'Making 
foot washing a sacrament; 'Reaffirming Doctrmal Stand- 
ards; 'Proposing changes in the section on "Our Theo- 
logical Task." — Lynne deMtchele and Garlmda Burton 

Financial Administration — (4/18/96) 

The committee recommended concurrence: 'Exempting 
the General Board of Pension and Health Benefits and the 
General Board of Publication fi^om the audit and review 
by GCFA; 'Allowing other structures to provide for the 
hinctions of the Council of Fin^ce and Administration, 
'Reducing the size of the Executive Committee of the 
General Board of Publication; 'Reducing the number of 
members required to call a meeting of the Executive 



126 



April 20, 1996 



Committee of the General Board of Publications; *Chang- 
ing the name of the General Board of Publication to 
United Methodist PubHshing House; 'Deleting Para. 
906.12; *Adding new administrative responsibilities for 
the cross-and-flame United Methodist insignia to General 
Council on Finance and Administration; *Giving GCFA 
authority to gather salary equity information; *Ensunng 
that no apportioned general funds are expended for use 
of alcoholic beverages; 'Adopting the Comprehensive 
Protection Plan; 'Allowing transfers out of the Cumula- 
tive Pension and Benefit Fund; 'Removing the South 
Africa ban in Cumulative Pension and Benefit Fund; 'Ad- 
justing actual contribution percentage tests for certain 
plan sponsors; 'Adopting the Cumulative Pension and 
Benefit Fund Plan; 'Clarifying definition of the word 
"compensation"; 'Adding a new paragraph to allow trans- 
fers out of the Ministerial Pension Plan; 'Removmg the 
South Afi-ica ban as of July 1, 1996 in the Ministerial 
Pension Plan; 'Adopting the Ministerial Pension Plan. 

The committee recommended nonconcurrence: 'Delet- 
ing mandatory language in support of World Service and 
Conference Benevolences; 'Giving an annual conference 
or local church the right to accept or refuse all or any 
portion of any apportionment; (there were 59 other peti- 
tions voted non-concurrence). 

The committee referred: 'To the General Board of Pen- 
sion and Health Benefits a petition to consider raising 
disability benefits for disabled pastors; *To the General 
Board of Pension and Health Benefits a petition to amend 
the Ministerial Pension plan; 'To the General Board of 
Pension and Health Benefits a petition on voluntary con- 
version program from MRPF to MPP; 'To the General 
Board of Pension and Health Benefits adding a new para- 
graph to Plan Document of the Ministerial Pension Plan; 
'To the General Board of Pension and Health Benefits 
allowing people to leave money in the personal pension 
funds after age 70, if they wish; 'Giving an annual confer- 
ence or local church the right to accept or refuse all or 
any portion of any. — Joretta Purdue, Erik Alsgaard 

General/Judicial Administration — (4/19/96, 4:00 
p.m.) 

The committee recommended concurrence: 'On desig- 
nating responsibilities for the Advance Special program; 
*0n concerning evaluation process of General Agencies; 
'On providing for retirement of general agency staff 
personnel; 'On nondiscrimination; 'On conditions sur- 
rounding open and closed meetings; 'On GCOM training 
of Conference Council on Ministries directors; 'On poli- 
cies for socially responsible investments; 'On complaints 
of misconduct or unsatisfactory performance of a Bishop; 
'On fair process in judicial proceedings; 'On guidelines 
for sexual misconduct policies. 

The committee recommended nonconcurrence: 'Delet- 
ing the conference Advance programs; 'Changing lan- 
guage concerning inclusiveness in Discipline Para. 4; 
'Concerning amenability and program accountability; 
'Pertaining to health benefits plan of general agency staff 
personnel; 'Requinng that associate general secretaries 
and assistant general secretaries be members of the 
UMC. 



The committee referred: To GCOM — Granting Advance 
Special status to Appalachia Service Project, Inc. — Tom 
Slack and Charlene Bailey 

Global Ministries — (4/19/96. 3:35 p.m.) 

The committee recommended concurrence: 'Condemn- 
ing the use of rape as a weapon of war; 'Registering 
opposition to Proposition 187 of California; 'Supporting 
communications access for people with hearing and sight 
impairment; 'Endorsing program recommendations 
from the National Committee on Deaf Ministries; 'Op- 
posing deportation of Salvadoran refugees fix)m the 
United States; 'Endorsing a statement on immigrants 
and refugees, "To Love the Sojourner"; 'Recognizing 
"the many faces" of persons affected by HIV/AIDS; 'En- 
couraging observance of World AIDS Day on December 
1; 'Offering recommendations from the Interagency 
Task Force on AIDS; 'Evaluating the church's responsi- 
bilities in a mass media culture; 'Calling for an end to 
abusive treatment methods for persons with mental dis- 
abiUties; 'Continuing the Hispanic Ministries and Native 
American Comprehensive plans; 'Adopting "Holy Bold- 
ness" plan for urban ministry; 'Providing quadrennial 
training for annual conference and district disaster re- 
sponse coordinators; 'Adopting a special emphasis on the 
U.S. rural crisis and affirming rural chaplains; 'Calling for 
the release of 14 Puerto Rican political prisoners; 'Con- 
tinuing the Communities of Shalom ministry and support- 
ing a national plan for town and country ministry; 
'Supporting cooperative parish ministry, church and 
community workers and mission personnel in the United 
States; 'Continuing the Special Program on Substance 
Abuse and Related Violence. 

The committee recommended concurrence with amend- 
ments: 'Providing for health and social care of the elderly; 
'Supporting mission work in Appalachia; 'Assisting 
teens at risk; 'Reducing the risk of child sexual abuse in 
the church. — Cheryl Edwards and Linda Bloom 

Higher Education and Chaplaincy — (4/19/96, 3:45 
p.m.) 

The committee recommended concurrence: 'To approve 
a resolution on incorporation (Pan Methodist) in order for 
the Afincan Methodist Episcopal, African Methodist Epis- 
copal Zion, and Christian Methodist Episcopal colleges 
and universities to establish eligibility for E.I.I.A.; 'To 
affirm and encourage the UM-related precollegiate 
schools and to learn more about their mission and contri- 
butions; 'To affirm the 11 historically Black colleges 
related to the UMC by estabUshing $46,708,480 as the 
Black College Fund goal for the 1997-2000 quadrennium 
(an increase of 12 percent from the 1992-1996 quadren- 
nium) and that this resolution be recorded in The Book 
of Resolutions of the 1996 General Conference; 'To 
amend Para. 1532 with the words "conference" and "and 
Diaconal Ministry"; 'To add a new sub-paragraph after 
Para. 1514.3 regarding inquiries to UM-related schools, 
colleges, and universities; To ask 1996 General Confer- 
ence to fund the National United Methodist Native 
American Center at $316,000 for 1997-2000 quadren- 
nium - 

The committee recommended concurrence with amend- 
ments: 'Para. 1505 to include the words "and persons 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No.5 



127 



with disabilities", *Para. 1515 to read "persons with 
disabilities" instead of "people with disabilities"; *The 
last sentence of the Ministry Study's proposed substitute 
as pertains to the Divisions of the General Board of 
Higher Education and Ministry (section VIII, par. 1508.1); 
*Para. 1531 dealing with the UM schools of theology to 
read "with the dynamics ot ministry in a multi-cultural 
society"; *To fund seminary education, amended to read 
1) encourage increased funding for seminary students 
through endowment programs and/or capital fund drives 
for United Methodist student grants, loans, and scholar- 
ships; and 2) Develop and evaluate the feasibility of a plan 
for seminary student loan repayment by years of service 
m UM missional areas; *To fund the Evangelical Semi- 
nary of Puerto Rico to the General Board of Higher 
Education and Ministry as amended to read: GBHEM 
continue its financial support of the Evangelical Seminary 
of Puerto Rico through the year 2000. (Delete the words 
"at the 1992 level"). *To add a new sub-point after Para, 
732.4d(ll), adding the words "United Methodist college 
students as" after "election of and before "lay mem- 
bers." 

The committee recommended nonconcur rence: *To 
change the makeup of the membership of the University 
Senate "To amend Para. 1506.2 dealing with election of 
the general secretary of the General Board of Higher 
Education and Ministry; *To amend Para. 1503 to move 
the accountability of the GBHEM from the GCOM to the 
Council of Bishops; *To amend Para. 1509.2 to delete 
words "World Service moneys"; — Dawn M. Hand and 
Tern Hiers 
Independent Commissions — (4/19/96, 4:45 p.m.) 
"Concurred with the document "Churches in Covenant 
Communion," with the amendment that UMC may con- 
tinue to maintain its own standards for ministerial training 
and ordination and apply those to the transfer of ministers 
from other denominations. This includes any prohibitions 
of the General Conference. "Concurred with a petition 
authorizing "historic" establishment of a Commission on 
Pan-Methodist Union; "Concurred with document, as 
amended, on Christian-Jewish Relations, "Building New 
Bridges in Hope"; "Concurred with mandating a Confer- 
ence Commission on Small Membership Church or other 
body to care for those functions. "Concurred by allowing 
the Council of Bishops to name an Ecumenical Officer 
other than the council's secretary; "Concurred by man- 
dating a Pan-Methodist approach to any event organized 
by a general agency of the UMC and Pan-Methodist 
approach to GCOM coordinating funcitons; Concurred by 
allowmg functions of Conference Commission on Chris- 
tian Unity and Interreligious Concerns to be assigned to 
an alternative structure, either existingor newly-created; 
Concurred by adding sections to present resolution on 
Holy Land tours, especially urging that United Method- 
ists enter partnership with indigenous Palestinian Chris- 
tians, help to strengthen Christian witness in the Holy 
Land and consult with UM Liaison in Jerusalem about how 
to implement tour resolution; "Concurred by retaming 
membership in Worid Methodist Council and continuing 
membership in the NCC, updating present language in 
the Book of Resolutions; "(joncurred by renaming His- 



toric Shrines as Heritage Landmarks and recommended 
two new Heritage Landmarks: First UMC, Johnston, PA 
(site of merger of Evangehcal and United Brethen in 
Christ Churches into EUB Church 50 years ago) and the 
Wesley Foundation at the University of Illinois, Cham- 
paign, first Wesley Foundation established by the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church as a student organization in a 
secular university. — Kristin Knudson Hams and Ann 
Whiting 

Local Church — (4/19/96, 3:30 p.m.) 

The committee recommended concurrence: "Naming the 
local church as the "most significant arena through which 
disciple-making occurs;" "Elimmating named local 
church program agencies (Para. 264) other than the 
church school; "Youth ministries coordinator and council 
and United Methodist Women. 

The committee recommended concurrence with amend- 
ments: "Stating the mission of the church is to make 
disciples of Jesus Christ, along with rationale and process 
to replace existing Paras. 101, 102 and 103; "Establishing 
the church council, amenable to the Charge Conference, 
as the basic organizational plan for the local church, 
mandating a comprehensive program of nurture, out- 
reach and witness, "Naming the pastor as the chief ad- 
ministrative officer of the church and charge; "Urging use 
of appropriate district and annual conference relation- 
ships and resources; "Retaining first person language in 
the statement concerning "The Journey of a Connectional 
People;" "Mandating training in cooperative ministry for 
general board staff, bishops, district superintendents, and 
conference staff and mandating priority in appointment 
making to place directors and clergy staff trained in coop- 
erative ministry in those settings; 

The committee recommended nonconcurrence: Amend- 
ing the present description of the mission and ministry 
statement of the church as submitted by the General 
Council on Ministries; — Rayford Woodrick and Kathy 
Kruger Noble 

Ordained and Diaconal Ministry — (4^19/96) 

The committee recommended changes to the Ministry 
Study that would ehminate sequential ordination for e- 
Iders. They approved single ordination for both deacons 
and elders and consecration for probationary members 
who are working toward ordination. Following this deci- 
sion, the committee returned to meeting in sub-commit- 
tees until 4:00p.m. 

— Judy Smith and Linda Green 



128 



April 20. 1996 



Petitions Referred to New Legislative Committee 



Petition 


From 


To 


Petition 


From 


To 


Petition 


From 


To 


20697 


CS 


GM 


22486 


GM 


CS 


20218 


MN 


GJ 


20698 


cs 


GM 


22487 


GM 


CS 


20375 


MN 


GJ 


20746 


CS 


GM 


20247 


HE 


GJ 


20376 


MN 


GJ 


20887 


■ cs 


GJ 


22101 


HE 


MN 


20377 


MN 


GJ 


22505 


cs 


GM 


20092 


LC 


DI 


20722 


MN 


GJ 


22545 


cs 


GJ 


20094 


LC 


DI 


20803 


MN 


GJ 


20822 


DI 


MN 


20095 


LC 


DI 


21266 


MN 


GJ 


22743 


DI 


GJ 


20096 


LC 


DI 


21267 


MN 


GJ 


22747 


DI 


GJ 


20097 


LC 


DI 


21268 


MN 


GJ 


20074 


GJ 


FA 


20224 


LC 


DI 


21269 


MN 


GJ 


20157 


GJ 


CS 


20276 


LC 


DI 


21270 


MN 


GJ 


20547 


GJ 


CS 


20277 


LC 


DI 


21543 


MN 


GJ 


20593 


GJ 


FA 


20529 


LC 


DI 


21544 


MN 


GJ 


20603 


GJ 


FA 


20554 


LC 


DI 


21546 


MN 


GJ 


20605 


GJ 


FA 


21030 


LC 


DI 


21547 


MN 


GJ 


20774 


GJ 


FA 


21442 


LC 


DI 


21548 


MN 


GJ 


20824 


GJ 


MN 


21517 


LC 


DI 


21549 


MN 


GJ 


21263 


GJ 


MN 


22107 


LC 


DI 


21732 


MN 


GJ 


21264 


GJ 


MN 


22112 


LC 


DI 


21893 


MN 


LC 


21482 
21550 
21551 


GJ 
GJ 
GJ 


FA 

MN 

MN 


22528 
22530 


LC 
LC 


DI 
DI 


21894 
22391 


MN 
MN 


LC 
GJ 


21552 


GJ 


MN 


22571 


LC 


DI 


22396 


MN 


GJ 


21553 


GJ 


MN 


22572 


LC 


DI 


22606 


MN 


GJ 


21569 
21630 


GJ 
GJ 


FA 


22720 


LC 


DI 


22607 


MN 


GJ 


FA 


20075 


MN 


GJ 


22608 


MN 


GJ 


22390 


GJ 


MN 


20210 


MN 


GJ 


22609 


MN 


GJ 


22392 


GJ 


MN 


20211 


MN 


GJ 


22699 


MN 


GJ 


22393 


GJ 


MN 


20212 


MN 


GJ 


22852 


MN 


GJ 


22394 


GJ 


MN 


20213 


MN 


GJ 


22853 


MN 


GJ 


22395 


GJ 


MN 


20214 


MN 


GJ 


22854 


MN 


GJ 


22605 


GJ 


MN 


20215 


MN 


GJ 


22855 


MN 


GJ 


23071 


GJ 


FA 


20216 


MN 


GJ 


22856 


MN 


GJ 


22037 


GM 


HE 


20217 


MN 


GJ 


22857 


MN 


GJ 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No. 5 



129 



Consent Calendar Explanation 

There are three consent calendars: A) concurrence with proposed changes to the Discipline. B) concurrence with petitions on 
non-Disciplinary matters. C) non-concurrence on Disciphnary and non-Disciplinary items. The first day items will be listed as 01. 
The second day will be listed 02, and so forth. Items can be placed on the consent calendar if: 1) no more than five votes were cast 
against the prevaihng position; 2) it has no financial implications; 3) the proposal does not require a constitutional amendment. Any 
five delegates may have a consent calendar item removed by signing the appropriate form found in Room 204. This form must be 
returned to the secretary by 3 p.m. on the day it appears in the DCA. 



Consent Calendar A02 



Correction: 



90- 



2203.7 

The correct vote for this Calendar 
Item was: For: 65; Against: 0. This 
vote requires this calendar item to 
be placed on the Consent Calendar. 



93-604.1 

Subject: Election of 
Secretary-Designate 

Committee Item: CO23-604.1-C 
Petition: 

21610-CO-604.1-D. Pg. 180 
Membership: 86; Present: 78; 
For: 77;-Against: 0; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

1 ) Concurrence [ ] Nonconcurrence Dale / 



94-605 

Subject: Responsibilities of the 

Secretary-Designate 

Committee Item: CO24-605-A 
Petition: 

21611-CO-605-D, Pg. 180 
Membership: 86; Present: 79; 
For: 78; Against: 0; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence as amended as follows: 

Renumber H 605 as H 604.2 and .3 and 
amend: 

2. Assumption of Office. The secre- 
tary-designate shall assume the responsi- 
bilities of the office of secretary as soon 
after the adjournment of the General Con- 
ference as all work in connection with the 
session has been completed, including the 
corrections to the Daily Chnstian Advo- 
cate, which serves as the official journal of 
the General Conference. The exact date 



of the transfer of responsibihty to the sec- 
retary-designate shall be determined by 
the Commission on the General Confer- 
ence, but shall not be later than December 
31, following the adjournment of the Gen- 
eral Conference. 

3. Assigned Duties.The secretary, 
shall, at th e r e qu e st of h e G e n e ral Com 
mission on tho Gonoral Conference, assist 
in initiating proc e dur e s to inform dole 
gat e s from outside the United States con 
c e ming both th e op e ration of th e G e n e ral 
Conference and mat e rials it will consider 
-in cooperation with the General Com- 
mission on the General Conference, 
shall initiate proceedures to prepare 
delegates from Central Conferences 
for full participation in the General 
Conference by providing information 
concerning both the operation of the 
General Conference and materials it 
will consider. As far as possible, the 
materials should be provided in the 
languages of the delegates. 

After consultation with the Council of 
Bishops and the General Commission on 
Christian Unity and Interreligious Con- 
cerns the secretary shall issue invitations 
to ecumenical representatives. 

( J Concurrence [ ] Nonconcurrence Date / 



95-608.2 

Subject: General Conference 

Petitions 

Committee Item: CO25-608.2-C 
Petition: 

20709-CO-608.2-D, Pg. 181 
Membership: 86; Present: 82; 
For: 79; Against: 0; Not Voting: 3; 
Date: 4/19 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

[ ] Concurrence [ 1 Nonconcurrence Dale / 



96-703 

Subject: Annual Conference 

Accessibility 

Committee Item: CO31-703-A 
Petition: 

20362-CO-703-D, Pg. 187 
Membership: 86; Present: 82; 
For: 78; Against: 1; Not Voting: 3; 
Date: 4/19 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence as amended as follows: 

Insert a new sub-paragraph after 11703.3 
and renumber accordingly: 

The Aimual Conference sessions 
and all conforonco me e ting s shall be 
held in places which are accessible to 
persons with disabilities. Tho follow 
ing arc guideline s as to what malios a 
place acces s ible: 

Architectural Guidolinos 

a. illl mooting rooms to bo used arc 
acco ss iblo to tho s e in wheelchairs. 
Examples of things which may malio 
a room acces s ible: 

1) Everything is at groimd level 
with no stops. 

2) An elevator is available. 

3) A ramp of sii8c and moximiua 
angle of 1/13 that wheelchairs can ne 
gotiate is available. 

1) Door openings are at least 36 
inche s wide. 



S. Pews or chairs are arranged to 
include s pace for wheelchairs. 

b. AccoGsible washroom s . 

c. Convenient parking for those 
with disabilities. 

d. Curb cut s if curbs must be nego 



c. Adequate hand rails for safety. 

f. Adequate lighting. 

g. For overnight meetings, accessi 
ble lodging for participant s . 

Communications Guidelines 

a. A loud opealtcr oystcm. 



130 



April 20. 1996 



b. Sound equipment for th e more 
profoundly h e aring impairodi 

c. Signing for the deaf. 

d. Largo print program materials or 
tape recording s available. 

0. Programs and directions malting 
use of vi s ual s . s >Tnbol s , images, and 
sounds for persons who have diffi 
culty communicating via th e printed 
or spoken word. 

Tran s portation Guid e lin es 

If at all po s sible that Annual Con 
forenco and other major m ee ting s be 
held at sites accessible by public or 
arranged tran s portation. 

[ ] Concurrence [ ] Nonconcurrence Date / 



97-707.4 

Subject: Membership on Annual 

Conference Councils. Boards & 

Agencies 

Committee Item: CO35-707.4-C 
Petition: 

22180-CO-707.4-D. Pg. 1268 
Membership: 86; Present: 78; 
For: 75; Against: 0; Not Voting: 3; 
Date: 4/19 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 



98-608.6 

Subject: Petitions to General 

Conference 

Committee Item: CO42-608.6-C 
Petition: 

22168-CO-608.6-D, Pg. 1263 
Membership: 86; Present: 82; 
For: 79; Against: 0; Not Voting: 3; 
Date: 4/19 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

1 ) Concurrence 1 ] Nonconcurrence Date / 



99-608.3 

Subject: Petitions to General 
Conference 

Committee Item: CO43-608.3-C 
Petition: 
22167-CO-608.3-D, Pg. 1263 
Membership: 86; Present: 82; 
For: 79; Against: 0; Not Voting: 3; 
Date: 4/19 



The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 



1006081 

Subject: Petitions to General 
Conference 

Committee Item: CO45-608.1-C 
Petition: 

22166-CO-608.1-D, Pg. 1263 
Membership: 86; Present: 82; 
For: 79; Against: 0; Not Voting: 3; 
Date: 4/19 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

[ 1 Concurrence [ ] Nonconcurrence Dale / 



101-608.9 

Subject: Petitions to General 

Conference 

Committee Item: CO61-608.9-C 
Petition: 

22171-CO-608.9-D. Pg. 1264 
Membership: 86; Present: 76; 
For: 73; Against: 0; Not Voting: 3; 
Date: 4/19 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

[ ] Concurrence [ ] Nonconcurrence Date / 



102-608.8 

Subject: Petitions to General 

Conference 

Committee Item: CO62-608.8-C 
Petition: 

22170-CO-608.8-D, Pg. 1263 
Membership: 86; Present: 76; 
For: 73; Against: 0; Not Voting: 3; 
Date: 4/19 
The Committee recommends concur- 



[ ] Concurrence [ ] Nonconcurrence Dale 



10371 

Subject: An Amendment on Men 
and Women 

Committee Item: CS1-71-A 
Petition: 

20283-CS-71-D.Pg. 119 
Membership: 102; Present: 95; 
For: 89; Against: 4; Not Voting: 2; 
Date: 4/18 



The Committee recommends concur- 
rence as amended as follows: 

(Additions added by the Legislative 
Committee are underlined) 

Add a new sub-paragraph after 1I71E: 

Women and Men. We affirm with 

scripture the basic similarity of the 
sexes and assert that it is human simi- 
larities and not differences that allow 
persons to find intimacy and partner- 
ship in accordance with Gods inten- 
tion. We reject th e anci e nt duali s m 
between male and female which ha s 
led to the erroneous notion that one 
gender is superior to another, and 
that one gender must strive against 
another, and that members of one 
gender may receive love, power and 
esteem only at the expense of an- 
other. We especially reject the idea 
that God made individuals as incom- 
plete fragments made whole only in 
relationship to union with another. 
We call upon women and men alike to 
share power and control, to learn to 
give freely and to receive freely, to be 
complete and to respect the whole- 
ness of others. We seek for every in- 
dividual opportunities and freedom to 
love and be loved, and to seek and 
receive justice and to practice moral 
ethical self-determination. We un- 
derstand our gender diversity to be a 
gift from God, intended to add to the 
rich variety of human experience and 
perspective; and we guard against at- 
titudes and traditions that would use 
this good gift to leave members of one 
sex more vulnerable in relationships 
than members of another. 

[ ] Concurrence [ J Nonconcurrence Date / 



10471 

Subject: Divorce 

Committee Item: CS2-71-A 
Petition: 

20922-CS-71-D, Pg. 122 
Membership: 102; Present: 95; 
For: 91; Against: 3; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 4/18 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence as amended as follows: 

(Legislative Committee additions are 
underlined. First para, was split into two 
parts) 

Delete 11710 and substitute new text: 

D) Divorce. When a married couple is 
estranged beyond reconciliation, 
even after thoughtful consideration 
and counsel, divorce is a re grettable 
alternative in the midst of broken- 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No. 5 



131 



ness. It is recommended that methods 
of mediation be used to minimize the 
adversarial nature and fault finding 
that is often part of our current judi- 
cial processes. 

Although divorce publicly declares 
that a marriage no longer exists, 
other covenantal relationships re- 
sulting from the marriage remain, 
such as the nurture and support of 
children and extended family ties. We 
urge respectful negotiations in decid- 
ing the custody of minor children, and 
support the consideration of either or 
both parents for this responsibility, in 
that custod y not he reduced to finan- 
cial support, control or manipulation 
and retaliation. The welfare of each 
child is the most important considera- 
tion. 

Divorce does not preclude a new 
marriage. We encourage an inten- 
tional commitment of the church and 
society to minister compassionately 
to those in the process of divorce, as 
well as members of divorced emd re- 
married families in a community of 
faith where Gods grace is shared by 
all. 

[ ) Concurrence [ ) Nonconcurrence Dale / 



107 72 

Subject: Right to Health Care 

Committee Item: CS23-72-C 
Petition: 

20927-CS-72-D, Pg. 124 
Membership: 102; Present: 88; 
For: 87; Against: 0; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 4/19 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

1 ) Concurrence [ ] Nonconcurrence Dale / 



108-72 

Subject: Media Violence and 
Christian Values 

Committee Item: CS24-72-C 
Petition: 

20926-CS-72-D, Pg. 123 
Membership: 102; Present: 92; 
For: 92; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/19 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

[ ] Concurrence [ ] Nonconcurrence Date / 



11172 

Subject: Rights of Persons with 
Handicapping Conditions 

Committee Item: CS31-72-C 
Petition: 

22317-CS-72-D, Pg. 1226 
Membership: 102; Present: 91; 
For: 91; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/19 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

[ ] Concurrence [ ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



112 72 

Subject: The Social Commimity: 
Rural Life 

Committee Item: CS32-72-C 
Petition: 

22319-CS-72-D, Pg. 1226 
Membership: 102; Present: 91; 
For: 89; Against: 1; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 4/19 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 



10570 

Subject: Animal Life 

Committee Item: CS6-70-C 
Petition: 
20919-CS-70-D, Pg. 117 
Membership: 102; Present: 92; 
For: 90; Against: 0; Not Voting: 2; 
Date: 4/19 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 



10972 

Subject: Rights of Religious 
Minorities 

Committee Item: CS27-72-C 
Petition: 

20924-CS-72-D, Pg. 123 
Membership: 102; Present: 92; 
For: 91; Against: 0; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 4/19 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 



113 72 

Subject: Basic Rights of all Persons 

Committee Item: CS33-72-C 
Petition: 

20023-CS-72-D. Pg. 123 
Membership: 102; Present: 93; 
For: 92; Against: 0; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 4/19 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 



[ ] Nonconcurrence Dale 



[ ) Concurrence ( J Nonconcurrence Date 



( ] Concurrence [ ] Nonconcurrence Date / 



10670 

Subject: Space 

Committee Item: CS9-70-C 
Petition: 
20920-CS-70-D,Pg. 117 
Membership: 102; Present: 88; 
For: 84; Against: 3; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 4/19 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 



11076 

Subject: Our Social Creed 

Committee Item: CS28-76-C 
Petition: 

20306-CS-76-D, Pg. 125 
Membership: 102; Present: 92; 
For: 92; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/19 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 



1141115 

Subject: Bylaws 

Committee Item: CS63-1115-C 
Petition: 

20951-CS-1115-D, Pg. 129 
Membership: 102; Present: 93; 
For: 93; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/19 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 



I ) Concurrence ( ) Nonconcurrence Dale 



[ ) Concurrence 1 ] Nonconcu 



1 Concurrence ( | No 



132 



April 20, 1996 



115lll4 

Subject: Headquarters 

Committee Item: CS65-1114-C 
Petition: 

20950-CS-1114-D, Pg. 129 
Membership: 102; Present: 93; 
For: 92; Against: 1; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/19 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

[ 1 Concurrence [ ] Nonconcurrence Date / 



116-1113.1 
Subject: Staff 

Committee Item: CS68-1113.1-C 
Petition: 

20948-CS-1113.1-D, Pg. 129 
Membership: 102; Present: 93; 
For: 93; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/19 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

[ ) Concurrence [ ] Nonconcurrence Date / 



117-1112 

Subject: Internal Organization 

Committee Item: CS69-1112-C 
Petition: 

20947-CS-1112-D, Pg. 128 
Membership: 102; Present: 93; 
For: 91; Against: 1; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 4/19 
The Committee recommends concur- 



1 Nonconcurrence Date 



118 11112 

Subject: Financial Support 

Committee Item: CS70-1111.2-C 
Petition: 

20946-CS-1111.2-D, Pg. 128 
Membership: 102; Present: 93; 
For: 93; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/19 
The Committee recommends concur- 



1 Concurrence [ ] Nonconcurrence Date 



11911111 

Subject: Financial Support 

Committee Item: CS71-1111.1-C 
Petition: 



20945-CS-llll.l-D, Pg. 128 
Membership: 102; Present: 93; 
For: 93; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/19 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

( 1 Concurrence ( 1 Nonconcurrence Dale / 



I2O74 

Subject: Civil Obedience and Civil 
Disobedience 

Committee Item: CS89-74-C 
Petition: 

20933-CS-74-D, Pg. 125 
Membership: 102; Present: 88; 
For: 85; Against: 1; Not Voting: 2; 
Date: 4/19 
The Committee recommends concur- 



[ ] Concurrence ( 1 Nonconcurrence Date 



I2I74 

Subject: Education 

Committee Item: CS90-74-C 
Petition: 

20932-CS-74-D, Pg. 125 
Membership: 102; Present: 88; 
For: 88; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/19 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

[ 1 Concurrence I 1 Nonconcurrence Date / 



12268 

Subject: Our Theological Task 

Committee Item: DI7-68-C 
Petition: 

20267-DI-68-D, Pg. 236 
Membership: 112; Present: 104; 
For: 104; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/19 
The Committee recommends concur- 



I ] Concurrence [ ] Nonconcurrence Date 



12367 

Subject: A Resolution of Intent 

Committee Item: DI18-67-C 
Petition: 

22865-DI-67-D, Pg. 1278 
Membership: 112; Present: 104; 
For: 103; Against: 1; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/19 



The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

[ 1 Concurrence ( 1 Nonconcurrence Date / 



124-1216 

Subject: Ministry of the Laity 

Committee Item: DI27-1216-C 
Petition: 

21408-DI-1216-D,Pg.251 
Membership: 112; Present: 105; 
For: 105; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/19 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

[ 1 Concurrence [ ) Nonconcurrence Date / 



125-1212 

Subject: Evangelism Responsibilities 

Committee Item: DI28-1212-C 
Petition: 

21406-DI-1212-D,Pg.250 
Membership: 112; Present: 105; 
For: 105; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/19 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

[ ] Concurrence [ 1 Nonconcurrence Date / 



126-1210 

Subject: Cooperation 

Committee Item: DI30-1210-C 
Petition: 

21404-DI-1210-D, Pg. 249 
Membership: 112; Present: 103; 
For: 103; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/19 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

[ ] Concurrence [ ] Nonconcurrence Date / 



127-1208.1 

Subject: Education Responsibilities 

Committee Item: DI31-1208.1-C 
Petition: 

21402-DI-1208.1-D,Pg.249 
Membership: 112; Present: 103; 
For: 102; Against: 1; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/19 
The Committee recommends concur- 



[ 1 Nonconcurrence Date 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No. 5 



133 



128-1208 

Subject: Education Responsibilities 

and Standards 

Committee Item: DI32-1208-C 
Petition: 

21401-DI-1208-D.Pg.248 
Membership: 112; Present: 105; 
For: 105; Agamst: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/19 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

I 1 Concurrence 1 J Nonconcuirence Dale / 



129-1207 

Subject: Christian Education and 

Age-Level Ministries 

Committee Item: DI34-1207-C 
Petition: 

21400-DI-1207-D,Pg.248 
Membership: 112; Present: 105; 
For: 105; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/19 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

1 1 Concurrence [ ] Nonconcurrence Date / 



130-1202.4 

Subject: Board of Discipleship 
Responsibilities 

Committee Item: DI35-1202.4-C 
Petition: 

22204-DI-1202.4-D. Pg. 1283 
Membership: 112; Present: 105; 
For: 105; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/19 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 



131 1202 

Subject: Responsibilities of the 
Genetcil Board of Discipleship 

Committee Item: DI37-1202-C 
Petition: 

21398-DI-1202-D,Pg.246 
Membership: 112; Present: 105; 
For: 105; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/19 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

( 1 Concurrence [ ] Nonconcurrence Dale / 



132-1201 

Subject: Purpose of the General 
Board of Discipleship 

Committee Item: DI38-1201-C 
Petition: 

21397-DI-1201-D,Pg.246 
Membership: 112; Present: 105; 
For: 105; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/19 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 



133216 

Subject: Admission into the Chiu-ch 
Committee Item: DI39-216-A 
Petition: 

21430-DI-216-D,Pg.946 
Membership: 112; Present: 101; 
For: 99; Against: 1; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 4/19 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence as amended as follows: 
Amend 11216: 

1. [Delete existing text.] Christ con- 
stitutes the Church as his Body by the 
power of the Holy Spirit (1 Corin- 
thians 12:13, 27). The Church draws 
new persons into itself as it seeks to 
remain faithful to its commission to 
proclaim and exemplify the Gospel. 
Baptism is the sacrament of initiation 
and incorporation into the Body of 
Christ. An infant, child, or adult who 
is baptized becomes a member of the 
catholic (universal) Church, of the de- 
nomination, and a baptized member 
of the local congregation. (See H 209.) 
After baptism, the Church provides 
the nurture which makes possible a 
comprehensive and lifelong process 
of growing in grace. Becoming a pro- 
fessing member requires the answer 
of faith of the baptized person made 
visible in a service of Profession of 
Christian Faith and Confirmation us- 
ing the vows of the baptismal cove- 
nant (see 11211). 

a) Baptized infants and children are 
to be instructed and nurtured in the 
meaning of the faith, the rights and 
responsibilities of their baptism and 
in spiritual and moral formation, us- 
ing materials approved by The United 
Methodist Church. Using the Services 
of the Baptismal Covenant youth will 
profess their faith, commit them- 
selves to a life of discipleship and be 
confirmed. Confirmation is both a hu- 
man act of commitment and the gra- 
cious action of the Holy Spirit 



strengthening and empowering disci- 
pleship. 

b) Youth and adults who have not 
been baptized and who are seeking to 
be saved from their sins and profess 
Jesus Christ as their Lord and Savior, 
are proper candidates for baptism in 
The United Methodist Church. It shall 
be the duty of the congregation, led by 
the pastor, to instruct them in the 
meaning of baptism, in the meaning of 
the Christian faith, and the history, 
organization, and teachings of The 
United Methodist Church, using ma- 
terials approved by The United Meth- 
odist Church for that purpose. After 
the completion of the period of nur- 
ture and instruction, the sponsor(s) 
and pastor shall bring them before the 
congregation and administer the 
Services of Baptismal Covenant in 
which persons are baptized, con- 
firmed and received into the Chiwch. 
2. [Delete existing text.] a) Formation 
in the baptismal covenant and in the 
call to ministry in daily life is a lifelong 
process and is carried on through all 
the activities which have educational 
value. The pastor gives specific lead- 
ership that prepares youth for their 
profession of faith and commitment to 
discipleship, and for the Holy Spirit s 
action confirming them in their faith 
and empowering their discipleship. 
This preparation focuses attention 
upon the meaning of discipleship and 
the need for professing members to be 
in mission in all of life s relationships. 
b) There are many occasions as per- 
sons mature in the faith when the 
Holy Spirit s confirming action may 
be celebrated, such as in the reaf- 
firmation of the baptismal covenant 
or other services related to life pas- 
sages. Unlike baptism, which is a 
once-made covenant and can only be 
reaffirmed, not repeated, confirma- 
tion is a dynamic action of the Holy 
Spirit that can be repeated. 

3. Preparation for the experience of 
confirmation profession of faith and 
confirmation shall be provided for all 
candidates for full membership persons, 
including adultsr. btrt yYouth who are 
completing the sixth grade shall normally 
be the youngest persons recruited for 
confirmation preparation and full m e m 
borohip such preparation. When 
younger persons, of their own volition, 
seek enrollment in confirmation prepara- 
tion for profession of faith and confir- 
mation, such preparation shall be at the 
discretion of the pastor. 

4. Poroons in preparation for full mom 
bor(?hip mahc up tlio prGparator>' roll of 



April 20, 1996 



th e church. All baptized persons, in- 
cluding infants, children, youth, and 
adults shall be listed on the pr e pnrntor>' 
membership roll Roll of Baptized Mem- 
bers, and other p e rsons who hav e d e 

clarod the» — intoroat ifl church 

m e mbership and hav e been rolled in con 
firmation pr e paration may b e li s t e d a s pr e 
parator>' mombors. (Sec also HH 223, 
232^.) - 

5. Statistic s of church mombor s hip 
aro count s of profes s ing mombor s 
rather than of all baptized mom 
bef&iFor statistical purposes church 
membership is equated to the roll of 
professing members. 



[ ] Concurrence [ ] Nonconcu 



Date 



134211 

Subject: The Meaning of 
Membership 

Committee Item: DI40-211-A 
Petition: 

21429-DI-211-D, Pg. 946 
Membership: 112; Present: 102; 
For: 99; Against: 3; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/19 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence as amended as follows: 
Change last sentence to read: 
7. Such p e rsons may also b e ask e d t To 
receive and profess the Christian faith as 
contained in the Scriptures of the Old and 
New Testaments. 

[ 1 Concurrence [ ] None 



135-209 

Subject: Membership of a Local 

United Methodist Church 

Committee Item: DI41-209-A 
Petition: 

21427-DI-209-D,Pg.945 
Membership: 112; Present: 102; 
For: 99; Against: 0; Not Voting: 3; 
Date: 4/19 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence as amended as follows: 

Amend H 209: 

The membership of a local United 
Methodist church shall include all bap- 
tized persons. 1. The baptized 

membership of a local United Method- 
ist church shall include all baptized 
persons who have received Christian 
baptism in the local congregation or 
whose membership has been trans- 
ferred to the local United Methodist 
church subsequent to baptism in 



some other congregation. In valid bap- 
tism, water is administered in the 
name of the Triune God (specified in 
the ritual as Father, Son and Holy 
Spirit) by an authorized person and 
the Holy Spirit is invoked with the 
laying on of hands, ordinarily in the 
presence of the congregation. 

2. The professing membership of a 
local United Methodist church shall 
include all baptized persons who have 
come into membership by conf e ssion pro- 
fession of faith at bapti s m or confirma - 
tion, — or by transfer, as expressed in 
services of baptism, confumation, 
Profession of Christian Faith, reaf- 
firmation of baptismal vows or trans- 
fer. (See n 230, 232, 236, 243). aft4 
whoso names have not boon romovod 
from th e m e mb e rship rolls by reason of 
death, transfer, withdrawal, or romoval for 
caus e . (,So€ n 330, 333, 236 343.) 



The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 



( 1 Concurrence ( ] Nonconcurrence Dale / 



[ 1 Concu 



[ ] Nonconcurrence Date 



136243 

Subject: Membership Rolls 

Committee Item: DI94-243-C 
Petition: 

21445-DI-243-D, Pg. 952 
Membership: 112; Present: 104; 
For: 103; Against: 1; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/19 
The Committee recommends concur- 



[ J Nonconcurrence Dale 



137221 

Subject: Care of Children and Youth 

Committee Item: DI95-221-C 
Petition: 

21433-DI-221-D, Pg. 947 
Membership: 112; Present: 101; 
For: 100; Against: 0; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 4/19 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

[ ] Concurrence [ ] Nonconcurrence Date / 



138 105 

Subject: The General Ministry of all 
Christian Believers 

Committee Item: DI98-105-C 
Petition: 

21425-DI-105-D, Pg. 942 
Membership: 112; Present: 104; 
For: 104; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/19 



139 



232 



Subject: Membership Records and 
Reports 

Committee Item: DI99-232-A 
Petition: 

21444-DI-232-D,Pg.952 
Membership: 112; Present: 101; 
For: 100; Against: 0; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 4/19 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence as amended as follows: 
Add a new H after current H 232: 
For purpose of record, a permanent 
list of congregational baptisms with 
dates, birthdates, full names, ad- 
dresses, full names of parents, god- 
parents or sponsors, and officiating 
minister shall be kept by each local 
church. In the case of transfer to an- 
other congregation, death, or with- 
drawal notation of this shall be made 
in the baptismal record. 

[ ) Concurrence [ I Nonconcurrence Date / 



140243 

Subject: Transfer and Termination 
of Membership 

Committee Item: DI100-243-A 
Petition: 
21446-DI-243-D, Pg. 953 
Membership: 112; Present: 103; 
For: 103; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 4/19 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence as amended as follows: 

Add a second new H following current H 
243: 

Persons may be removed from the 
roll of professing members by death, 
transfer, withdrawal, charge confer- 
ence action or removal for cause (See 
nil 230, 232, 236-243, 2626.4.) 

( ) Concurrence [ ) Nonconcurrence Dale / 



141-230 

Subject: Care of Members 

Committee Item: DI102-230-A 
Petition: 
21441-DI-230-D,Pg.950 
Membership: 112; Present: 101; 
For: 96; Against: 4; Not Voting: 1; 



Daily Edition Vol. 3 No. 5 



Date: 4/19 

The Committee recommends concur- 
rence as amended as follows: 

Renumber H 230 as 11 228.2A and amend 
as follows: 

21)) While primary responsibility and 
initiative rests with each individual pro- 
fessing member faithfully to perform the 
vows of the baptismal covenant mem 
berohip which have been solemnly as- 
sumed, if the professed member should 
be neglectful of that responsibility, these 
procedures shall be followed: 

(l>r If a professed member residing in 
the community'. ..the membership secre- 
tary shall report that professed mem- 
bers name to the .'\dministrative Council 
or the Council on Ministries, which shall 
do all in its power to reenlist the pro- 
fessed member in the active fellowship of 
the Church. It shall visit the professed 
member and make clear that, while the 
professed members name. ..and that, 
since the professed member is not at- 
tending the church where enrolled, the 
professed member is requested to do 
one of four things: (a) renew the vows and 
bocomo a regular worchipor return to 
living in the commtmity of the baptis- 
mal covenant in the church where the 
professed members name is recorded. 
(b) request transfer to another United 
Methodist church where the professed 
member will b e a regular worohipor re- 
turn to living in the community o